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Peapack-Gladstone, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Peapack-Gladstone
Peapack Brook
Peapack Brook
Map of Peapack-Gladstone in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Map of Peapack-Gladstone in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Peapack-Gladstone, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Peapack-Gladstone, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Somerset
Incorporated April 23, 1912
Area
 • Total 5.853 sq mi (15.159 km2)
 • Land 5.808 sq mi (15.044 km2)
 • Water 0.045 sq mi (0.116 km2)  0.76%
Area rank 261st of 566 in state
11th of 21 in county
Elevation 243 ft (74 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 2,582
 • Estimate (2015) 2,602
 • Rank 468th of 566 in state
18th of 21 in county
 • Density 444.5/sq mi (171.6/km2)
 • Density rank 451st of 566 in state
19th of 21 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07934 - Gladstone
07977 - Peapack
Area code(s) 908
FIPS code 3403557300
GNIS feature ID 0885345

Peapack-Gladstone (also written as Peapack and Gladstone) is a borough in Somerset County in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 Census, the borough's population was 2,582, reflecting an increase of 149 (+6.1%) from the 2,433 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 322 (+15.3%) from the 2,111 counted in the 1990 Census. It is part of the New York metropolitan area, as well as the larger New YorkNewarkBridgeport, NY-NJ-CT-PA Combined Statistical Area.

Peapack-Gladstone was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 28, 1912, from portions of Bedminster Township, subject to the results of a referendum held on April 23, 1912.

Peapack is believed to have been derived from "Peapackton", a Lenape Native American term meaning "marriage of the waters", a reference to the confluence of the Peapack Brook and Raritan River in the area. Gladstone was named in honor of William Ewart Gladstone, who served as British Prime Minister several times between 1868 and 1894.

History

Peapackkiln
Lime kiln

A lime kiln that was in operation until as late as 1950 is located at the center of Peapack. A detailed history of the town is described in the book A Journey Through Peapack and Gladstone as well as in New Jersey Country Houses: The Somerset Hills (written by John K. Turpin and W. Barry Thomson), Mountain Colony Press, Inc. The Peapack-Gladstone Bank was established on September 21, 1921, originally named the Peapack-Gladstone Trust Company. It operates as the local bank for the greater region and is publicly traded under NASDAQ with the ticker symbol PGC.

Horseback riding is very popular throughout the area. The United States Equestrian Team has its home in Gladstone.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 5.853 square miles (15.159 km2), including 5.808 square miles (15.044 km2) of land and 0.045 square mile (0.116 km2) of water (0.76%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Gladstone, Peapack and Ravine Lake.

The borough borders Bedminster Township to the southwest, Bernardsville to the east and Far Hills to the southeast in Somerset County; and Chester Township to the northwest and Mendham Township to the northeast in Morris County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 1,226
1930 1,273 3.8%
1940 1,354 6.4%
1950 1,450 7.1%
1960 1,804 24.4%
1970 1,924 6.7%
1980 2,038 5.9%
1990 2,111 3.6%
2000 2,433 15.3%
2010 2,582 6.1%
Est. 2015 2,602 0.8%
Population sources:
1920 1920-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 2,582 people, 887 households, and 676 families residing in the borough. The population density was 444.5 per square mile (171.6/km2). There were 949 housing units at an average density of 163.4 per square mile (63.1/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 90.09% (2,326) White, 4.07% (105) Black or African American, 0.12% (3) Native American, 1.94% (50) Asian, 0.04% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.74% (45) from other races, and 2.01% (52) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.88% (281) of the population.

There were 887 households out of which 37.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.5% were married couples living together, 8.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.8% were non-families. 19.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 21.1% from 25 to 44, 33.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.0 years. For every 100 females there were 97.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 95.2 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $123,875 (with a margin of error of +/- $16,668) and the median family income was $145,333 (+/- $23,674). Males had a median income of $86,379 (+/- $16,014) versus $60,833 (+/- $16,980) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $61,841 (+/- $12,910). About 0.0% of families and 2.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 2.2% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 2,433 people, 840 households, and 646 families residing in the borough. The population density was 419.5 people per square mile (162.0/km2). There were 871 housing units at an average density of 150.2 per square mile (58.0/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.45% white, 3.12% African American, 0.08% Native American, 1.23% Asian, 0.70% from other races, and 0.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.78% of the population.

There were 840 households out of which 37.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.5% were married couples living together, 5.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.0% were non-families. 18.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.71 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the borough the population was spread out with 26.0% under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 26.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 97.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.0 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $99,499, and the median income for a family was $118,770. Males had a median income of $62,446 versus $46,500 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $56,542. About 1.9% of families and 4.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.1% of those under age 18 and 4.1% of those age 65 or over.

Arts and culture

Points of interest in the borough include:

  • Natirar - estate spanning 404 acres (163 ha) in Peapack-Gladstone, Far Hills and Bedminster that was sold by Hassan II of Morocco, to Somerset County and is now administered by the Somerset County Park Commission, including the 247 acres (100 ha) in Peapack-Gladstone.
  • The Gladstone train station building was re-labeled "Boston," and its surroundings were supplied with peat-moss dirt, period vehicles and extras in Victorian dress, for a 1962 movie shoot. In the Oscar-winning film The Miracle Worker, Anne Bancroft in the role of Annie Sullivan boards a long-distance steam train there to take the job as Helen Keller's teacher.

The borough was a major shooting location of the CBS soap opera Guiding Light from 2007 until the show's conclusion in 2009.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 25.45 miles (40.96 km) of roadways, of which 18.20 miles (29.29 km) were maintained by the municipality, 5.17 miles (8.32 km) by Somerset County and 2.08 miles (3.35 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

Gladstoneterminal
Gladstone NJT terminus

NJ Transit's Gladstone station is the terminus of the Gladstone Branch of the Morris and Essex Lines, taking many of the borough's commuters to Hoboken and New York Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan daily. Peapack has its own station less than 2 miles (3.2 km) before the terminus, close to Interstate 78, Interstate 287, U.S. Route 202 and U.S. Route 206.

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