Loch Arbour, New Jersey facts for kids

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Loch Arbour, New Jersey
Village
Village of Loch Arbour
Seagull above the waters in Loch Arbour
Seagull above the waters in Loch Arbour
Map of Loch Arbour in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Loch Arbour in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Loch Arbour, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Loch Arbour, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated April 23, 1957
Named for Lochaber, Scotland
Area
 • Total 0.141 sq mi (0.364 km2)
 • Land 0.101 sq mi (0.261 km2)
 • Water 0.040 sq mi (0.104 km2)  28.43%
Area rank 564th of 566 in state
52nd of 53 in county
Elevation 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 194
 • Estimate (2015) 187
 • Rank 562nd of 566 in state
53rd of 53 in county
 • Density 1,928.2/sq mi (744.5/km2)
 • Density rank 298th of 566 in state
35th of 53 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07711
Area code(s) 732 exchanges: 517, 531, 660, 663
FIPS code 3402541010
GNIS feature ID 0885283
Website www.locharbournj.us

Loch Arbour is a village in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States, formed in 1957. It was named after Lochaber, Scotland. As of the 2010 United States Census, the village's population was 194, reflecting a decline of 86 (-30.7%) from the 280 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 100 (-26.3%) from the 380 counted in the 1990 Census. As of 2010, Loch Arbour was the third-smallest municipality in New Jersey in terms of area (behind Shrewsbury Township and East Newark) and was the fifth-smallest municipality by population in the state of New Jersey.

History

Loch Arbour was incorporated as a village by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 23, 1957, from portions of Ocean Township, based on the results of a referendum held that same day. The borough was named for Lochaber, Scotland.

Its formation was driven by efforts to build condominiums in the area. Residents who sought to prevent the development led the secession, taking with them the last portion of oceanfront property in what The New York Times described as "the now ironically-named Ocean Township."

In 1997, Loch Arbour voters rejected a ballot proposal that would have it merge back into Ocean Township by an 88-69 margin, and proposals to merge with Allenhurst or Interlaken failed by a nearly 10-1 margin.

A ballot proposal in 2011 again considered a merger with Allenhurst, citing a potential reduction in property taxes for residents. In 2012, Loch Arbour officials held discussions with their counterparts in Allenhurst towards a plan in which the two municipalities would merge, subject to approval by the councils of both communities and approval of a referendum by voters in both Loch Arbour and Allenhurst. The merger drive was driven by property taxes paid to the Ocean Township School District, a relationship that would be ended by the merger, under which the combined municipality would send students at lower cost to the Asbury Park Public Schools.

While there are four municipalities that retain the Village type of government (Loch Arbour, Ridgefield Park, Ridgewood and South Orange), none of them still use the Village form of government. Loch Arbour was the last to do so, but on December 20, 2011, its residents voted to change to the Walsh Act form of government, with a three-member board of commissioners.

Geography

Loch Arbour covers a total area of 0.141 square miles (0.364 km2), including 0.101 square miles (0.261 km2) of land and 0.040 square miles (0.104 km2) of water (28.43%) according to 2010 United States Census Bureau data.

The village is located along the Atlantic Ocean in eastern Monmouth County and is bordered to the north by the Borough of Allenhurst, to the west by the borough of Interlaken and to the south by the City of Asbury Park.

Deal Lake covers 158 acres (64 ha) which is overseen by the Deal Lake Commission, which was established in 1974. Seven municipalities border the lake, accounting for 27 miles (43 km) of shoreline, including Allenhurst, Asbury Park, Deal, Interlaken, Neptune Township and Ocean Township.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 297
1970 395 33.0%
1980 369 −6.6%
1990 380 3.0%
2000 280 −26.3%
2010 194 −30.7%
Est. 2015 187 −3.6%
Population sources:
1960-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 194 people, 82 households, and 52.97 families residing in the village. The population density was 1,928.2 per square mile (744.5/km2). There were 159 housing units at an average density of 1,580.4 per square mile (610.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the village was 94.85% (184) White, 1.55% (3) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 1.55% (3) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.52% (1) from other races, and 1.55% (3) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.61% (7) of the population.

There were 82 households out of which 28.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.4% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.4% were non-families. 29.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.37 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the village, the population was spread out with 19.6% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 13.9% from 25 to 44, 44.3% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 49.0 years. For every 100 females there were 102.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 108.0 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $120,000 (with a margin of error of +/- $62,957) and the median family income was $119,167 (+/- $20,917). Males had a median income of $73,500 (+/- $27,181) versus $92,500 (+/- $38,683) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $60,575 (+/- $9,229). About 0.0% of families and 0.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 280 people, 120 households, and 77 families residing in the village. The population density was 2,894.0 people per square mile (1,081.1/km2). There were 156 housing units at an average density of 1,612.4 per square mile (602.3/km2). The racial makeup of the village was 95.00% White, 2.14% African American, 0.71% Asian, 0.36% from other races, and 1.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.71% of the population.

There were 120 households out of which 20.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.2% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.8% were non-families. 27.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.33 and the average family size was 2.88.

In the village, the population was spread out with 17.5% under the age of 18, 6.1% from 18 to 24, 30.0% from 25 to 44, 30.7% from 45 to 64, and 15.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 105.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.6 males.

The median income for a household in the village was $68,542, and the median income for a family was $74,250. Males had a median income of $61,964 versus $41,250 for females. The per capita income for the village was $34,037. None of the families and 4.8% of the population were living below the poverty line.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the village had a total of 2.04 miles (3.28 km) of roadways, of which 1.82 miles (2.93 km) were maintained by the municipality and 0.22 miles (0.35 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 71 is the main access road that passes north-south through the village.

Loch Arbour is one hour south of New York City and east of Philadelphia. The closest limited access road is Route 18, and both Interstate 195 and the Garden State Parkway are at least 15 minutes away.

Public transportation

As of July 2010, NJ Transit served the village on the 837 (New Jersey bus) route.

The NJ Transit Jersey Shore Line passes through the village, with the closest stop at Allenhurst station in neighboring Allenhurst, New Jersey.


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