Allenhurst, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Allenhurst, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Allenhurst
The old Allenhurst Railroad Station
The old Allenhurst Railroad Station
Map of Allenhurst in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Allenhurst in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Allenhurst, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Allenhurst, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated April 26, 1897
Named for Abner Allen
Area
 • Total 0.283 sq mi (0.733 km2)
 • Land 0.263 sq mi (0.680 km2)
 • Water 0.020 sq mi (0.053 km2)  7.21%
Area rank 554th of 566 in state
50th of 53 in county
Elevation 23 ft (7 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 496
 • Estimate (2015) 491
 • Rank 556th of 566 in state
52nd of 53 in county
 • Density 1,887.9/sq mi (728.9/km2)
 • Density rank 299th of 566 in state
36th of 53 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07711
Area code(s) 732 exchanges: 517, 531, 660, 663
FIPS code 3402500730
GNIS feature ID 0885136
Website www.allenhurstnj.org

Allenhurst is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States named for resident Abner Allen and incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 26, 1897, from portions of Ocean Township. As of the 2010 United States Census, Allenhurst had 496 inhabitants, reflecting a decline of 222 (-31%) from the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 5% from the 1990 Census. Bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the east and Deal Lake to the west, it is within close proximity to New York City and is a stop on the NJ Transit North Jersey Coast Line. The borough is at the center of a string of wealthy communities between Long Branch and Asbury Park with many historic homes built during the late 19th and early 20th centuries. In 2006, Allenhurst ranked 131st in Forbes magazine's list of the most expensive ZIP codes in the United States.

History

Allenhurst "reflects the history of development from a rural area to a suburb of New York City. In 1895, the 120-acre Allen farm was bought by the Coast Land Improvement Company in order to build an exclusive resort community to attract upper class summer residents. The proximity of Allenhurst to the rail line was significant in the growth and popularity of Allenhurst, allowing residents of New York City easier access to the community."

On April 26, 1897, Allenhurst was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature from portions of Ocean Township. The borough is situated in the center of a string of wealthy communities between Long Branch and Asbury Park. The borough was named for resident Abner Allen.

During the late 19th and early 20th centuries many historic homes were built in Victorian, Queen Anne, Italian Renaissance Revival, Tudor Revival, Prairie, Mission Revival, American Craftsman, Shingle, Colonial Revival, Neoclassical and Gothic Revival architectural styles. Local ordinances overseen by an historic preservation commission have ensured the preservation of historical architecture by enforcing strict guidelines for the renovation of older homes.

In 2006, Allenhurst ranked 131st in Forbes magazine's list of the most expensive ZIP codes in the United States. In the magazine's 2012 rankings, the borough was ranked 448th, with a median price of $665,043.

After Hurricane Sandy had devastated the shoreline in October 2012, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) in 2015 pumped sand onto the beaches, which contained unexploded ordnance in the form of hundreds of fusing components for World War I-era artillery. From December 2016 until March 2017, USACE Baltimore District specialists in munitions and explosives removed 362 chap-stick-sized potentially live pieces, mostly boosters, which had most likely been disposed of as excess after WWI, and are not uncommon at Gateway’s Sandy Hook Unit. "Not only was Fort Hancock an active military base until 1974, but also the proving ground of the U.S. Army from 1874 until 1919."

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.283 square miles (0.733 km2), including 0.263 square miles (0.680 km2) of land and 0.020 square miles (0.053 km2) of water (7.21%).

The borough borders the Atlantic Ocean to the east,Deal Lake to the west, and is within close proximity to New York City. Neighbour Monmouth County communities are Deal, Interlaken, Loch Arbour and Ocean Township.

The beachfront is characterized by two groins, known to locals as "Crackup" and "The L". "The L" was featured in Scuba Diving magazine as one of New Jersey's premier shore diving locations.

Deal Lake covers 158 acres (64 ha) , overseen by the Deal Lake Commission, established in 1974. Seven municipalities border the lake, accounting for 27 miles (43 km) of shoreline, also including Asbury Park, Deal, Interlaken, Loch Arbour, Neptune Township and Ocean Township.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 165
1910 306 85.5%
1920 343 12.1%
1930 573 67.1%
1940 520 −9.2%
1950 758 45.8%
1960 795 4.9%
1970 1,012 27.3%
1980 912 −9.9%
1990 759 −16.8%
2000 718 −5.4%
2010 496 −30.9%
Est. 2015 491 −1.0%
Population sources: 1900-1920
1900-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 718 people, 285 households, and 188 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,750.6 people per square mile (1,066.2/km2). There were 370 housing units at an average density of 1,417.4 per square mile (549.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.35% White, 0.84% African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.14% from other races, and 0.97% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.51% of the population.

There were 285 households out of which 23.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.8% were married couples living together, 6.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.7% were non-families. 24.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the borough the population was spread out with 28.9% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 28.8% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 18.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42 years. For every 100 females there were 106.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.0 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $85,000, and the median income for a family was $109,180. Males had a median income of $70,625 versus $32,171 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $42,710. About 1.0% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.6% of those under age 18 and 2.1% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 496 people, 217 households, and 115 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,887.9 per square mile (728.9/km2). There were 365 housing units at an average density of 1,389.3 per square mile (536.4/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 94.76% (470) White, 1.01% (5) Black or African American, 0.00% (0) Native American, 1.01% (5) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.41% (7) from other races, and 1.81% (9) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.44% (22) of the population.

There were 217 households out of which 16.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.2% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 47.0% were non-families. 37.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.29 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 15.3% under the age of 18, 9.1% from 18 to 24, 23.4% from 25 to 44, 32.5% from 45 to 64, and 19.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.2 years. For every 100 females there were 105.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 103.9 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $79,250 (with a margin of error of +/- $41,438) and the median family income was $131,500 (+/- $30,872). Males had a median income of $71,944 (+/- $75,722) versus $44,625 (+/- $3,762) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $63,707 (+/- $14,113). About 3.2% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 8.9% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 5.14 miles (8.27 km) of roadways, of which 4.73 miles (7.61 km) were maintained by the municipality, 0.08 miles (0.13 km) by Monmouth County and 0.33 miles (0.53 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

NJ Transit train service is offered from the Allenhurst station on the North Jersey Coast Line, providing service to Newark Penn Station, Secaucus Junction and New York Penn Station, as well as Hoboken Terminal. The station has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1980.

New Jersey Transit offers local bus transportation on the 837 route.

Parks and recreation

The Allenhurst Beach Club, a 2,450-member recreational facility, has attracted residents and visitors during the summer months for generations. As of 2013 it featured a 525,000 gallon salt water swimming pool, a children's wading pool, cabanas and bathhouses. New membership is no longer open to non-residents according to the borough administration.


Allenhurst, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.