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New Rochelle, New York
City
Official seal of New Rochelle, New York
Seal
Nickname(s): Queen City of the Sound
Motto: Nunquam Retrorsum
(Never Backward)
Location within Westchester County and the state of New York
Location within Westchester County and the state of New York
Country United States
State New York
County Westchester
Incorporated (city) 1899
Area
 • Total 13.2 sq mi (34.3 km2)
 • Land 10.4 sq mi (26.8 km2)
 • Water 2.9 sq mi (7.5 km2)
Elevation 85 ft (26 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 77,062
 • Density 6,973.5/sq mi (2,692.5/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 10801, 10802, 10804, 10805
Area code(s) 914
FIPS code 36-50617
GNIS feature ID 0958451
Website http://www.newrochelleny.com

New Rochelle /rəˈʃɛl/ is a city in Westchester County, New York, United States, in the southeastern portion of the state.

In 2007, the city had a population of 73,260, making it the seventh-largest in the state of New York. As of the 2010 Census, the city's population had increased to 77,062. In November 2008 Business Week magazine listed New Rochelle as the best city in New York State, and one of the best places nationally, to raise children. In 2014, New Rochelle was voted the 13th best city to live in, out of 550 cities, and was the only city in Westchester County on the list.

History

Etymology and early history

The European settlement was started by refugee Huguenots (French Protestants) in 1688, who were fleeing religious persecution in France (such as dragonnade) after the revocation by the king of the Edict of Nantes. Many of the settlers were artisans and craftsmen from the city of La Rochelle, France, thus influencing the choice of the name of "New Rochelle".

17th century

01 Jacob Leisler
Statue of Jacob Leisler

Some 33 families established the community of la Nouvelle-Rochelle in 1688. A monument containing the names of these settlers stands in Hudson Park, the original landing point of the Huguenots. Thirty-one years earlier, the Siwanoy Indians, a band of Algonquian-speaking Lenape (also known as the Delaware by English colonists) sold their land to Thomas Pell. In 1689 Pell officially deeded 6,100 acres (25 km2) for the establishment of a Huguenot community. Jacob Leisler is an important figure in the early histories of both New Rochelle and the nation. He arrived in America as a mercenary in the British army and later became one of the most prominent merchants in New York. He was subsequently appointed acting-governor of the province, and it was during this time that he acted on behalf of the Huguenots.

Of all the Huguenot settlements in America founded with the intention of being distinctly French colonies, New Rochelle most clearly conformed to the plans of its founders. The colony continued to attract French refugees until as late as 1760. The choice of name for the city reflected the importance of the city of La Rochelle and of the new settlement in Huguenot history and distinctly French character of the community. French was spoken, and it was common practice for people in neighboring areas to send their children to New Rochelle to learn the language.

18th century

Thomas Paine Monument 2015
The Thomas Paine Monument

In 1775, General George Washington stopped in New Rochelle on his way to assume command of the Army of the United Colonies in Massachusetts. The British Army briefly occupied sections of New Rochelle and Larchmont in 1776. Following British victory in the Battle of White Plains, New Rochelle became part of a "Neutral Ground" for General Washington to regroup his troops. After the Revolutionary War ended in 1784, patriot Thomas Paine was given a farm in New Rochelle for his service to the cause of independence. The farm, totaling about 300 acres (1.2 km2), had been confiscated from its owners by state of New York due to their Tory activities.

The first national census of 1790 shows New Rochelle with 692 residents. 136 were African American, including 36 who were freemen and the remainder slaves.

19th century

Through the 18th century, New Rochelle had remained a modest village that retained an abundance of agricultural land. During the 19th century, however, New York City was a destination from the mid-century on by waves of immigration, principally from Ireland and Germany. More established American families left New York City and moved into this area. Although the original Huguenot population was rapidly shrinking in relative size, through ownership of land, businesses, banks, and small manufactures, they retained a predominant hold on the political and social life of the town.

The 1820 Census showed 150 African-Americans residing in New Rochelle, six of whom were still slaves. The state had abolished slavery with by a gradual plan; children of slave mothers were born free and all slaves were freed by 1827.

In 1857 the Village of New Rochelle was established within the borders of the Town of New Rochelle. A group of volunteers created the first fire service in 1861. In 1899, a bill creating the New Rochelle City Charter was signed by Governor Theodore Roosevelt. It was through this bill that the Village and Town of New Rochelle were joined into one municipality. In 1899, Michael J. Dillon narrowly defeated Hugh A. Harmer to become New Rochelle's first mayor. The recently established city charter designated a board of aldermen as the legislative unit (with two members to be elected from each of four wards, and 10 elected from the city at-large.

Modern history

20th and 21st centuries

NR Realty ad 1919 1
Early 1900s development announcement
New Rochelle Map 1918

By 1900 New Rochelle had a population of 14,720. Throughout the city, farms, estates, and wooded homesteads were bought up by realty and development companies. Planned residential neighborhoods such as Rochelle Park, one of the first planned communities in the country, soon spread across the city, earning New Rochelle the sobriquet "City of Homes". In 1909, Edwin Thanhouser established Thanhouser Film Corporation. Thanhouser's Million Dollar Mystery was one of the first serial motion pictures. In 1923, New Rochelle resident Anna Jones became the first African-American woman to be admitted to the New York State Bar.

Poet and resident James J. Montague captured the image of New Rochelle in his 1926 poem "Queen City of the Sound".:

No stern and rock bound coast is here,
But, peaceful and at ease
The quiet sea lies blue and clear
Beside the spreading trees.
Afar from din of marts and mills
A happy people dwell
Among the placid, green clad hills
Of lovely New Rochelle

[...]

When Nature, seeking upon men
To cast a magic spell,
She looked the world around – and then
She fashioned New Rochelle.
—James J. Montague

In 1930, New Rochelle recorded a population of 54,000, up from 36,213 only ten years earlier. During the 1930s, New Rochelle was the wealthiest city per capita in New York state and the third wealthiest in the country.

By the end of the century, the Metro North railroad station was rebuilt along with a $190 million entertainment complex, nicknamed New Roc City, which features a 19-screen movie theater, an IMAX theater, an indoor ice-hockey arena, mini-golf, go karts, an arcade, restaurants, a hotel, loft-apartments and a mega supermarket. The complex was built on the site of the former New Rochelle Mall, which had opened in 1968.

In 2014, New Rechelle's planning board approved $149 million in developments to three major sections of the city. The developments include restaurants, stores, hotels, an entertainment area, theaters and a mixed-use waterfront area, and are expected to be completed within 10 years.

Geography

New Rochelle is located at the southeastern point of continental New York State. It lies on the Long Island Sound, bordered on the west by Pelham, Pelham Manor and Eastchester, by Scarsdale to the north and east, and Mamaroneck and Larchmont to the east. The city lies 2 miles (3.2 km) north of the New York City border (Pelham Bay Park in The Bronx). According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 13.2 square miles (34.3 km2). The city has a rough triangle shape, approximately 10 miles (16 km) from north to south and 1.5 miles (2 km) from east to west at its widest point.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 692
1870 279
1890 9,057
1900 14,720 62.5%
1910 28,867 96.1%
1920 36,213 25.4%
1930 54,000 49.1%
1940 58,408 8.2%
1950 59,725 2.3%
1960 76,812 28.6%
1970 75,385 −1.9%
1980 70,794 −6.1%
1990 67,265 −5.0%
2000 72,182 7.3%
2010 77,062 6.8%
Est. 2015 79,846 3.6%
U.S. Decennial Census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 77,062 people residing in the city. The racial makeup of the city was 47.9% White, 18.1% Black, 0.1% Native American, 4.2% Asian, <0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.3% from some other race and 1.5% from two or more races. 27.8% were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

As measured by the census of 2000, New Rochelle had a population of 72,182 people, 24,275 occupied households, and 17,546 families residing in the city. The population density was 6,973.5 people per square mile (2,692.7/km²). There were 26,995 housing units at an average density of 2,608.0 per square mile (1,007.0/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 68% White, 19% African American, 0.20% Native American, 4% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 6% from other races, and 3% from two or more races. 20% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. In the city, the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 22.2% from 45 to 64, and 15.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 90.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.9 males. There were 26,189 households out of which 32.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.5% were married couples living together, 12.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 28.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.29.

19,312 residents of New Rochelle were enrolled in school, with 2,743 in pre-school or kindergarten, 8,105 in elementary school, 3,704 in high school and 5,030 in college or graduate school. Out of 42,872 individuals over the age of 25, 20% (9,766) had no high school diploma, 23% (11,325) were high school graduates, 14% (6,710) achieved some level of college education, 5% (2,347) held an associate degree, 19% (9,120) held a bachelor's degree and 20% (9,604) possessed a graduate or other advanced degree.

The working population was 35,262, 95.7% of whom were employed. The occupational breakdown had 42% working in 'management', 25% working in 'sales', 17% in 'services', 8% in 'construction', and 7% in 'production and transport'. The average daily commute was 30 minutes, with 60% driving to work, 12% carpooling, 18% traveling via public-transportation and 7% using other means.

According to the 2007 Census Bureau estimates, the median income for a household in the city was $64,756 and the median income for a family was $88,004. About 9.8% of the population lived below the poverty line.

Residential profile

New Rochelle is commonly referred to as the Home Town because of the significant amount of single-family, residential development that exists throughout most of the city. While the formerly industrial downtown section is more densely developed, with condominiums, high rises, offices, shopping centers, affordable housing complexes, a medical center, nursing homes, two college campuses and an inter modal transportation hub, the rest of the city consists of sprawling, residential neighborhoods. There are more than 11,500 single family units within the city, more than that of neighboring Larchmont, Mamaroneck and Scarsdale combined. The total number of separate households surpasses 26,000, more than that of neighboring Pelham, Pelham Manor, Eastchester, Scarsdale, Mamaroneck and Larchmont combined.

Housing variety

Some of the country's most expensive real estate can be found in New Rochelle. The north end of the city (10804) is ranked in Forbes magazine's list of the '500 most expensive zip-codes' in the country. According to the list, the average household income was $199,061 and the average home price was over $752,000. Homes in Premium Point, a gated section of the city on Long Island Sound, are priced anywhere from $2 to $20 million. The three newest residential developments, 'Kensington Woods', 'The Greens at Cherry Lawn' and 'Riviera Shores', are all gated communities with single family homes priced from $2 million. With a population approaching 80,000 residents, New York State law dictates that the city provide an adequate amount of affordable housing units. New Rochelle has historically met and surpassed state requirements. It is working to replace the existing Weyman Avenue Projects with more community-centered, townhouse-style housing units. By embracing the needs of the poor, New Rochelle sets a precedent for other suburban communities to follow. Neighboring towns, including Mamaroneck, Larchmont and Scarsdale, have failed to meet the minimal affordable housing requirements set by the state. Popular consensus is that the presence of the poor precludes that of the middle-class and the wealthy. Considering the large number of working-class and affordable housing units found 'Downtown', the high property values prevalent throughout most of the city reflects the true economic diversity of New Rochelle. It is home to a range of families, from the financially disadvantaged to the very wealthy. One of 'the wealthiest people in the United States,' according to Forbes magazine, was longtime New Rochelle resident and businessman Sidney Frank.

Communities

Within the greater city borders are many established neighborhoods and subsections, several of which are larger in both size and population than neighboring towns of Larchmont, Bronxville and Pelham Manor. The public community areas most noted include: Bayberry, Beechmont, Bloomingdale Estates, Bonniecrest, Daisy Farms, Davenport Neck, Echo Manor, Forest Heights, Forest Knolls, French Ridge, Glen Island, Glenwood Lake, Heathcote, Lake Isle, Larchmont Woods, Lyncroft, Northfield, North Ridge, Paine Heights, Pinebrook, Premium Manor, Quaker Ridge, Residence Park, Rochelle Heights, Sans Souci, Scarsdale Downs, Shore Road, Sutton Manor, Vaneck Estates, Ward Acres, Wilmot Woods and Wykagyl. Premium Point, Kensington Woods and Cherry Lawn are gated neighborhoods accessible only by those immediate residents.

Landmarks and attractions

Fort Slocum Road
Overlooking Davids' Island
  • Columbia Island – a small island (approx. 150 feet (46 m) square) situated between Davids' Island and Pea Island. Up until 1940 it was known as Little Pea Island. CBS purchased it and built a concrete foundation to support a transmitter building topped by a 410-foot (120 m) tall antenna tower for WCBS-AM. The transmitter remained in operation until the 1960s, when the station was moved to nearby High Island.
  • Execution Rocks Lighthouse – centered in the middle of Long Island Sound, just south of Davids' Island. The structure was built in 1849 and includes a 55-foot (17 m) tall tower and the 'keeper's house'. It is rumored that the lighthouse's site got its name before the American Revolutionary War when British colonial authorities executed people by chaining them to the rocks at low tide and allowing the rising water to drown them. In reality, the name was chosen to reflect the historically dangerous shipping area created by the rocks exposure during low tides.
  • Huckleberry Island – a 10-acre (40,000 m2) island owned by the Huckleberry Indians, Inc., a club within the New York Athletic Club. The island is an important nesting site for waterbirds such as egrets and night herons.
  • Leland Castle – a 19th-century Gothic Revival castle built as the summer residence of Simeon Leland, a wealthy New York City hotel entrepreneur. It has since been acquired by the College of New Rochelle and is used as an art gallery available to the public.
  • St. John's Wilmot Church – a historic Episcopal parish located in the northern end of the City at the intersection of North Avenue and Wilmot Road, formerly referred to as "Cooper's Corner".
  • Thomas Paine Historical Site – a historical nexus within the city, the site comprises: the country home of the American pamphleteer and Revolutionary War hero Thomas Paine, his burial site, monument, and a museum. Paine's Cottage was built in 1793 and is a National Historic Landmark. The Thomas Paine Memorial Building, built in 1925, houses the library and museum collection of the Thomas Paine National Historical Association. Also on the site is the Brewster Schoolhouse, one of the oldest structural relics in Westchester County.
  • Trinity-St. Paul's Episcopal Church – added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2006. It is located at the northwest corner of Huguenot Street (also known as the Boston Post Road) and Division Street. This church represents the body of the majority group of New Rochelle's founding Huguenot French Calvanistic congregation that conformed to the liturgy of the established Church of England in June 1709. King George III gave Trinity its first charter in 1762. After the Revolutionary War, Trinity became a parish of the Protestant Episcopal Church of America.

Parks and recreation

Goose Island fr east Glen Is jeh
Islands along New Rochelle's waterfront
Johnson David Bayside New Rochelle New York
Bayside, New Rochelle, New York, by David Johnson, 1886

Waterfront

The shoreline within the City of New Rochelle measures 2.7 miles (4.3 km), but due to many irregularities and off-shore islands, the actual length of the waterfront is 9.3 miles (15.0 km). The unusual coastal features have over the years earned it the nickname, "the Queen City of the Sound."

  • Yacht, sailing and rowing clubs dot the coast on Long Island Sound and beach clubs line the shores of Davenport Neck. Beckwithe Point, The Greentree Country Club and The Surf Club are the largest of the private shore clubs, providing waterfront recreation to members during the summer season. The New York Athletic Club sits on Travers Island, located on the border of New Rochelle and Pelham Manor.
  • Echo Bay Yacht Club and Huguenot Yacht Club are two well known, private yacht clubs in the city.
  • New York Sailing School and New Rochelle Rowing Club each have histories dating back over 100 years.
  • The City operates a large marina with 300 slips and 150 mooring spaces.

Parks

The City has an impressive collection of parklands and nature preserves, with 102.5 acres (0.415 km2) of inland waters, 231.51 acres (0.9369 km2) of public park lands and 168 acres (0.68 km2) of park lets.

  • Glen Island – In 1879 John H. Starin, a former US Congressman and New York transportation king, bought five islands which he named 'Glen Island' and created perhaps the first theme park open to the public. His 12 steamboats transported millions of New York residents and others to the attractions which included a zoo, a natural history museum, a railway, a German beer garden (around the castle-like structure which still stands today), a bathing beach, and a Chinese pagoda. Today the park is a 105-acre (0.42 km2) island property connected to the mainland by a drawbridge built in the 1920s. One of the main features of the park is its pristine, crescent shaped beach offering access to Long Island Sound.
  • Five Islands Park is a series of islands connected by small footbridges and pathways, offers playground, sports, hiking and camping facilities for all residents to enjoy.
  • Hudson Park encompasses 13 acres (0.053 km2) along the city's harbor front and includes a beach for residents, the city boathouse, greenhouses, the shore station of the United States Coast Guard and several yacht and rowing clubs. The park is traditionally accepted as the original landing place of the Huguenot settlers. A granite boulder with bronze tablets commemorates the event.
  • Davids' Island, a 78-acre (320,000 m2) island of the coast of the city, is being transformed from a former American military base (Fort Slocum) into a park and environmental preserve. Beginning just after the Civil War, the island was a military base used to protect New York Harbors, during World War I it served as an army recruitment station and up until 1967, it maintained various 'Cold War' facilities. Today it is home to a variety of plants, birds, and animals. These include the endangered Kemp's ridley sea turtle, and rare birds such as osprey and least terns. Davids Island also supports valuable wetlands, rare rocky intertidal areas, and sandy beaches. The waters surrounding the Island are home to Winter Flounder, Atlantic Herring, and Atlantic Silversides.
  • Ward Acres, located in the North End, is a combination of untouched forest, wild lawns and meadows, acres of hiking, exercise trails and historic horse stables/cemeteries. In 2007, The Westchester County Department of Conservation produced a Natural Resource Management Plan in order to identify and protect the natural resource needs of the park. It encompasses 62 acres (250,000 m2), with the forests divided into four main sections, each distinct in both general characteristics and species presence. It's formed by a portion of a former private state that contained a horse farm, and by an old railroad right of way. It includes a 3-acre (12,000 m2) fenced-in dog run, and it is the only park in the City in which residents can walk a dog without a leash.
  • The Leatherstocking Trail is a 2-mile (3.2 km) long, inter-municipal hiking trail situated between New Rochelle and Mamaroneck, eventually linking into Saxon Woods County Park. It is part of a larger "Colonial Greenway Trail" in which it connects to Twin Lakes/Nature Study and Saxon Woods parks.
  • Sheldrake Lake which formerly served as a reservoir supplying the areas drinking water, is now a 60 acres (0.24 km2) park and nature conservancy promoting an increased understanding of the local ecology.
  • Twin Lakes Park, combined with the adjacent Nature Study Woods comprise 220 acres (0.89 km2) of woods, marsh, lakes, ponds and some fields along the Hutchinson River in New Rochelle's Northend. There are many foot trails weaving through woods, marshlands, fields and around two large lakes (formerly reservoirs).

Golf

  • Wykagyl Country Club is located in the Wykagyl section of New Rochelle on North Avenue just south of Quaker Ridge Road. Golfweek magazine ranks Wykagyl as one of America's Top 100 Classic Courses.
  • Pelham Country Club, straddles the border of New Rochelle and Pelham Manor. The course is a mile from the Westchester-New York City border and Pelham Bay Park.

Tennis

  • New Rochelle Tennis Club located in Wykagyl is one of the oldest lawn-tennis organizations in the country.

Transportation

Roads

Major highways include Interstate 95 and the Hutchinson River Parkway. Interstate 95 serves as the main route through New Rochelle with four exits directly serving the city. The Hutchinson River Parkway, which is designated for passenger vehicles only, runs through much of the city. Substantial congestion on the parkway occurs in both directions during the morning and evening rush-hour.

The Boston Post Road, also known as Main Street in downtown New Rochelle, is used as a major artery during the morning and evening commute. Most traffic via the Post Road is short distance or fairly local, yet vehicles have utilized Route 1 during times of heavy congestion on I-95 as a re-route.

Railroad

The city has a commuter railroad station served by Metro North and Amtrak.

Railroad history

See also: History of New Rochelle, New York#Railroad history

By 1848, the New York & New Haven opened their line along Long Island Sound. After the Civil War, proposals for new railroads reached new levels. Banking that the city would continue to grow northward, the New York, Westchester and Boston Railway Company was established to serve the large populations moving to the suburbs. Two main lines were built as part of the NYW&B; the Port Chester line and the White Plains line. While the populations of some communities served by the NYW&B did grow between 1912 and 1937, the growth was not sufficient or fast enough to provide adequate business for the railroad, and service was discontinued on December 31, 1937.

New Rochelle in media and fiction

  • In the early 20th century New Rochelle was home to one of the first movie studios in the country, Edwin Thanhouser's Thanhouser Film Corporation. Originally located on the corner of Warren and Grove Street, the company moved to Main Street near Echo Avenue after a devastating fire in 1913. The studio is noted for filming the first serial in motion pictures named Million Dollar Mystery.
  • Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the oldest and most widely known rendition of Robert Louis Stevenson's short story Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, was filmed in New Rochelle.
  • The North Avenue Irregulars was based upon the book of the same name by Reverend Albert Fay Hill, a nonfiction work about organized crime in New Rochelle.
  • Terrytoons animation studio was located in New Rochelle from 1928 to 1968. Its most popular characters include Mighty Mouse, Gandy Goose, Dinky Duck, Deputy Dawg, Luno and Heckle and Jeckle.
  • The song Happy To Keep His Dinner Warm from the Broadway show How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying is about Rosemary's desire to become a trophy wife and live in a mansion in New Rochelle.
  • Paul Whiteman, referred to as the "king of Jazz" by Duke Ellington, commissioned George Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue which was premiered by Whiteman's orchestra at the Glen Island Casino in 1924. Whiteman made his home in New Rochelle for many years.
  • The Story of Vernon and Irene Castle starring Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers takes place in New Rochelle.
  • George M. Cohan's song "Forty-five Minutes from Broadway" is about New Rochelle in the late 1890s. It still takes about forty-five minutes to travel to Broadway by train and foot from New Rochelle.
  • In the Warner Brothers musical film Footlight Parade (1933), Ruby Keeler references New Rochelle in the line "Gee I'm sorry that I ever, ever, Left my little home in New Rochelle". In 1992 the film was selected for preservation in the United States National Film Registry by the Library of Congress as being culturally and historically, significant.
  • Musical Give My Regards To Broadway references New Rochelle. and so does Guys and Dolls.
  • Ragtime, a novel written by New Rochelle resident E. L. Doctorow and set in New Rochelle, was released in 1976 and later became a successful Broadway show, and a major motion picture of the same name.
  • Peter DeRose wrote Deep Purple while sitting in his garden in New Rochelle.
  • Robert Allen composed "Home For The Holidays" and the Johnny Mathis hit "Chances Are" in New Rochelle.
  • Jerry Bock was a resident of New Rochelle when he wrote the musical Fiddler On The Roof.
  • New Rochelle resident J. Fred Coots wrote Santa Claus Is Coming To Town, one of the biggest best-sellers in American musical history.
  • The early 1960s TV hit The Dick Van Dyke Show starring Dick Van Dyke and Mary Tyler Moore as Rob and Laura Petrie. The Petrie family lived at 148 Bonnie Meadow lane in the north end of the city. That is a fictional house number. Carl Reiner had previously lived at 48 Bonnie Meadow.
  • The classic 1970s song "American Pie" was written by New Rochelle resident Don McLean.
  • In "search of an upscale, posh community", CBS chose New Rochelle as the setting for its science fiction television series Now and Again.
  • The film Catch Me If You Can is loosely based on the story Frank Abagnale, who grew up in New Rochelle in the 1960s.
  • The famous Mean Joe Green Coca-Cola commercial was shot in New Rochelle in 1979.
  • The 1986 horror film "Scream for Help" was shot in New Rochelle.
  • The 1988 novel The Devil's Arithmetic was set in New Rochelle at the beginning of the book.
  • The 1991 film Soap Dish, starring Robert Downey, Jr., Kevin Kline, Whoopie Goldberg, Gary Marshall and Sally Field, several references are made to the New Rochelle Tennis Club. The producer of the 'The Sun Also Sets' is being mocked by members of his tennis club who prefer to call it 'The Sun Also Sucks'. When the show has a reversal of fortune and the ratings soar, the shows producer invites the young director to "come play tennis with me up at my club in New Rochelle. It's a lovely place, you'll love it".
  • Scenes in Goodfellas were filmed on Alfred Lane, off Quaker Ridge Road in the Pinebrook Heights neighborhood. The house of the parents of Henry Hill's eventual wife, Karen, is on Alfred Lane. Henry goes across the street and pistol whips the neighbor after the neighbor sexually attacked Karen.
  • In the 1994 film City Slickers II, the main character Mitch Robbins and his wife Barbara live in New Rochelle, having moved there from Manhattan where they lived in the original film, City Slickers
  • The 1996 romantic comedy Love Is All There Is was filmed at the Greentree Country Club on Davenport Neck.
  • The Oscar-nominated Burt Reynolds film Starting Over includes a school carnival scene filmed at what is now known as the Hudson Montessori School on Quaker Ridge Road.
  • The character James 'Spike' Thompson (Dexter Fletcher) in the ITV series Press Gang comes from New Rochelle, but lives in Norbridge, England.
  • Scenes of the movie Burn After Reading, starring Brad Pitt and George Clooney, were filmed in Sutton Manor.
  • The music video for the song "Dance, Dance" by the band Fall Out Boy takes place in the gymnasium of Salesian High School in New Rochelle.
  • Portions of Chasing the Green (2008), starring Jeremy London and Ryan Hurst, were filmed in the city.
  • In the 5th episode of the 8th season of 24, the doctor lives in New Rochelle, on Brook Street.

Sister city

New Rochelle's 'sister city' is La Rochelle, France, a city and commune of western France with a (population 78,000 in 2004). There has been a 'friendly relationship' between the two cities since 1910.

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