Port Republic, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Port Republic, New Jersey
City
City of Port Republic
Amanda Blake Store
Amanda Blake Store
Map of Port Republic in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Port Republic in Atlantic County. Inset: Location of Atlantic County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Port Republic, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Port Republic, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Atlantic
Incorporated March 1, 1905
Area
 • Total 8.583 sq mi (22.230 km2)
 • Land 7.482 sq mi (19.378 km2)
 • Water 1.101 sq mi (2.852 km2)  12.83%
Area rank 226th of 566 in state
13th of 23 in county
Elevation 7 ft (2 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 1,115
 • Estimate (2015) 1,100
 • Rank 530th of 566 in state
21st of 23 in county
 • Density 149.0/sq mi (57.5/km2)
 • Density rank 524th of 566 in state
20th of 23 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08241
Area code 609 exchanges: 404, 652, 748
FIPS code 3400160600
GNIS feature ID 0885360
Website www.portrepublicnj.org

Port Republic is a city on the Mullica River, located in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city had a total population of 1,115, reflecting an increase of 78 (+7.5%) from the 1,037 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 45 (+4.5%) from the 992 counted in the 1990 Census.

It is a dry town, where alcohol cannot be sold.

History

Port Republic was settled as early as 1637, but a charter was not applied for until the founders Evi Smith, Hugh McCullum, and Richard Wescoat applied for a Royal charter to build a dam, sawmill, and gristmill on their land along Nacote Creek.

In its early days, Port Republic was known as Wrangleboro. During the American Revolutionary War, Port Republic provided refuge to the residents of the nearby community of Chestnut Neck when the British Army, arriving by ship, sacked their town on October 6, 1778. It had been used as a base by privateers who were capturing goods intended for British forces. Among the refugees was Daniel Mathis, a tavernkeeper who built the Franklin Inn in Port Republic, which is used as a private house today. Some of the British ships were trapped in the creek by the ebb tides. The General Lafayette Chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution erected a monument on October 6, 1911, to mark the site of the Battle of Chestnut Neck. A Continental Army soldier at the top of the 50-foot (15 m) monument faces the river, "guarding the shore" against the approaching enemy.

In 1842, an effort was made to rename the area from Wrangleborough to Unionville, with a post office to be established under that name. As another Unionville existed in the state, the name "Port Republic" was chosen.

Port Republic was incorporated as a city by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 1, 1905, from portions of Galloway Township. The city's name derives from the "U.S. Republic".

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 8.583 square miles (22.230 km2), including 7.482 square miles (19.378 km2) of land and 1.101 square miles (2.852 km2) of water (12.83%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Chestnut Neck and Unionville.

The city borders the township of Galloway in Atlantic County, and both Washington and Bass River townships in Burlington County.

The city is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve. Part of the city is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Atlantic County, along with areas in Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 405
1920 340 −16.0%
1930 373 9.7%
1940 402 7.8%
1950 423 5.2%
1960 561 32.6%
1970 586 4.5%
1980 837 42.8%
1990 992 18.5%
2000 1,037 4.5%
2010 1,115 7.5%
Est. 2015 1,100 −1.3%
Population sources: 1910-2000
1910-1920 1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 1,115 people, 415 households, and 320 families residing in the city. The population density was 149.0 per square mile (57.5/km2). There were 444 housing units at an average density of 59.3 per square mile (22.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the city was 95.78% (1,068) White, 0.63% (7) Black or African American, 0.45% (5) Native American, 0.90% (10) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.72% (8) from other races, and 1.52% (17) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.96% (33) of the population.

There were 415 households out of which 28.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.8% were married couples living together, 8.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.9% were non-families. 18.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 4.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the city, the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 20.3% from 25 to 44, 39.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46.1 years. For every 100 females there were 92.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.7 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $77,063 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,800) and the median family income was $89,375 (+/- $15,052). Males had a median income of $61,786 (+/- $11,982) versus $38,000 (+/- $4,481) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $36,408 (+/- $4,232). About 2.4% of families and 2.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.2% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 1,037 people, 365 households, and 289 families residing in the city. The population density was 136.0 people per square mile (52.5/km2). There were 389 housing units at an average density of 51.0 per square mile (19.7/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 95.08% White, 1.64% African American, 0.39% Native American, 0.58% Asian, 0.00% Pacific Islander, 0.68% from other races, and 1.64% from two or more races. 1.06% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 365 households out of which 36.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.9% were married couples living together, 10.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.8% were non-families. 16.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the city the age distribution of the population shows 24.0% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 29.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 96.8 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.1 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $65,833, and the median income for a family was $70,714. Males had a median income of $42,833 versus $34,375 for females. The per capita income for the city was $24,369. 3.5% of the population and 3.2% of families were below the poverty line. Out of the total population, 0.0% of those under the age of 18 and 13.2% of those 65 and older were living below the poverty line.

Transportation

Roads and highways

New Jersey State Route 167
Here, State Route 167 runs through Port Republic. This marker is one of the few signs indicating that Route 167 is state-maintained or exists at all.

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 23.29 miles (37.48 km) of roadways, of which 8.18 miles (13.16 km) were maintained by the municipality, 9.65 miles (15.53 km) by Atlantic County and 1.81 miles (2.91 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 3.65 miles (5.87 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

The Garden State Parkway passes through the city and is accessible at Interchange 48. U.S. Route 9 passes through Port Republic, as do County Route 575 and County Route 561 Alternate. A small piece of Route 167 is in the city.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service on the 559 route between Lakewood Township and Atlantic City.

Historic sites

Locations in Port Republic listed on the National Register of Historic Places include the Amanda Blake Store located at 104 Main Street (added January 25, 1979, as building #79001469), and the Port Republic Historic District (added May 16, 1991 as district #91000596), which is roughly bounded by Mill Street, Clark's Landing Road, Adams Avenue, Port Republic-Smithville Road and Riverside Drive.


Port Republic, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.