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Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
City
City of Egg Harbor City
Egg Harbor Commercial Bank, now the local library
Egg Harbor Commercial Bank, now the local library
Location of Egg Harbor City in Atlantic County. Inset: Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Location of Egg Harbor City in Atlantic County. Inset: Atlantic County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
Egg Harbor City, New Jersey is located in Atlantic County, New Jersey
Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
Location in Atlantic County, New Jersey
Egg Harbor City, New Jersey is located in New Jersey
Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
Location in New Jersey
Egg Harbor City, New Jersey is located in the United States
Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
Egg Harbor City, New Jersey
Location in the United States
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Atlantic
Incorporated June 14, 1858
Named for Gull eggs
Government
 • Type Faulkner Act (small municipality)
 • Body City Council
Area
 • Total 11.42 sq mi (29.58 km2)
 • Land 10.85 sq mi (28.10 km2)
 • Water 0.57 sq mi (1.48 km2)  4.99%
Area rank 198th of 565 in state
10th of 23 in county
Elevation
13 ft (4 m)
Population
 • Total 4,243
 • Estimate 
(2019)
4,052
 • Rank 403rd of 566 in state
17th of 23 in county
 • Density 388.1/sq mi (149.8/km2)
 • Density rank 462nd of 566 in state
14th of 23 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08215
Area code(s) 609 exchanges: 704, 726, 804, 965
FIPS code 3400120350
GNIS feature ID 0876119

Egg Harbor City is a city in Atlantic County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 4,243, reflecting a decline of 302 (-6.6%) from the 4,545 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 38 (-0.8%) from the 4,583 counted in the 1990 Census.

The city had the seventh-highest property tax rate in New Jersey, with an equalized rate of 5.044% in 2020, compared to 2.560% in the county as a whole and a statewide average of 2.279%.

History

Egg Harbor City was founded in 1854 by German Americans from Philadelphia as a refuge for those being persecuted in the anti-immigrant violence known as the Know-Nothing movement. It remained an island of German language and culture in South Jersey for more than 50 years.

Egg Harbor City was incorporated as a city by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on June 14, 1858, from portions of Galloway Township and Mullica Township. The city was reincorporated on February 13, 1868. The city's named comes from the gull eggs found in the area.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 11.438 square miles (29.625 km2), including 10.932 square miles (28.314 km2) of land and 0.506 square miles (1.311 km2) of water (4.42%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Clarks Landing, Gloucester Furnace and Gloucester Lake.

The city borders Mullica Township and Galloway Township in Atlantic County, and Washington Township in Burlington County.

The city is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve. All of the city is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Atlantic County, along with areas in Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 789
1870 1,311 66.2%
1880 1,232 −6.0%
1890 1,439 16.8%
1900 1,808 25.6%
1910 2,181 20.6%
1920 2,622 20.2%
1930 3,478 32.6%
1940 3,589 3.2%
1950 3,838 6.9%
1960 4,416 15.1%
1970 4,304 −2.5%
1980 4,618 7.3%
1990 4,583 −0.8%
2000 4,545 −0.8%
2010 4,243 −6.6%
2019 (est.) 4,052 −4.5%
Population sources:
1860-2000 1860-1920
1860-1870 1870
1880-1890 1890-1910
1910-1930 1930-1990
2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,243 people, 1,593 households, and 1,075 families residing in the city. The population density was 388.1 per square mile (149.8/km2). There were 1,736 housing units at an average density of 158.8 per square mile (61.3/km2)*. The racial makeup of the city was 62.95% (2,671) White, 17.94% (761) Black or African American, 0.38% (16) Native American, 2.22% (94) Asian, 0.09% (4) Pacific Islander, 12.28% (521) from other races, and 4.15% (176) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 26.28% (1,115) of the population.

There were 1,593 households out of which 30.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.0% were married couples living together, 21.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.5% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the city, the population was spread out with 24.9% under the age of 18, 10.5% from 18 to 24, 25.9% from 25 to 44, 26.9% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.4 years. For every 100 females there were 96.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 93.9 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $52,893 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,582) and the median family income was $67,654 (+/- $6,555). Males had a median income of $35,182 (+/- $7,553) versus $33,994 (+/- $2,214) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $22,294 (+/- $3,702). About 11.3% of families and 20.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 36.2% of those under age 18 and 12.7% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 4,545 people, 1,658 households, and 1,150 families residing in the city. The population density was 409.2 people per square mile (158.0/km2). There were 1,770 housing units at an average density of 159.4/sq mi (61.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 66.80% White, 14.19% African American, 0.37% Native American, 1.25% Asian, 0.09% Pacific Islander, 13.49% from other races, and 3.81% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino people of any race were 24.55% of the population.

There were 1,658 households, out of which 34.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.7% were married couples living together, 20.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.6% were non-families. 24.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.20.

In the city the population was spread out, with 28.3% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 29.7% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.9 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,956, and the median income for a family was $40,040. Males had a median income of $27,978 versus $23,560 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,151. About 11.7% of families and 13.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.5% of those under age 18 and 15.5% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

2018-09-16 12 19 57 View west along U.S. Route 30 (White Horse Pike) just west of New Jersey State Route 50 and Atlantic County Route 563 (Philadelphia Avenue) in Egg Harbor City, Atlantic County, New Jersey
U.S. Route 30 westbound in Egg Harbor City
Egg Harbor City Station
Egg Harbor City station, which is served by NJ Transit's Atlantic City Line

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 50.09 miles (80.61 km) of roadways, of which 34.05 miles (54.80 km) were maintained by the municipality, 14.46 miles (23.27 km) by Atlantic County and 1.58 miles (2.54 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

U.S. Route 30 (the White Horse Pike) is the most significant highway passing through Egg Harbor City. Egg Harbor City also features the northern terminus of New Jersey Route 50, which ends at an intersection with US 30 near the center of the city. Major county routes passing through the city include County Route 561 and County Route 563.

The closest limited access road is the Atlantic City Expressway which is two towns away in Hamilton Township while the Garden State Parkway is accessible in neighboring Galloway Township.

Public transportation

The Egg Harbor City station provides NJ Transit service on the Atlantic City Line, connecting 30th Street Station in Philadelphia and the Atlantic City Rail Terminal in Atlantic City.

NJ Transit provides bus service to and from Atlantic City on the 554 route.

The South Jersey Transportation Authority provides shuttle bus service connecting the Egg Harbor City train station with Atlantic City International Airport and Stockton University, as well as other area locations.

Education

The Egg Harbor City School District is responsible for the education of public school children in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of two schools, had an enrollment of 548 students and 51.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.7:1. Schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Charles L. Spragg School with 277 students in PreK to Grade 3 and Egg Harbor City Community School with 257 students in grades 4 to 8.

Students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Cedar Creek High School, which is located in the northern section of Egg Harbor City and opened to students in September 2010. As of the 2018–19 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 930 students and 73.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.7:1. The school is one of three high schools operated as part of the Greater Egg Harbor Regional High School District, which also includes the constituent municipalities of Egg Harbor City, Galloway Township, Hamilton Township and Mullica Township, and participates in sending/receiving relationships with Port Republic and Washington Township (Burlington County). Cedar Creek High School is zoned to serve students from Egg Harbor City, Mullica Township, Port Republic and Washington Township, while students in portions of Galloway and Hamilton townships have the opportunity to attend Cedar Creek through the school of choice program or through attendance in magnet programs offered at Cedar Creek. Seats on the nine-member board are allocated based on the population of the constituent municipalities, with one seat assigned to Egg Harbor City.

Township public school students are also eligible to attend the Atlantic County Institute of Technology in the Mays Landing section of Hamilton Township or the Charter-Tech High School for the Performing Arts, located in Somers Point.

The Pilgrim Academy is a private Christian school. Founded by Dr. Warren Allem in 1971, the school teaches children from kindergarten through 12th grade. The name is taken from John Bunyan's allegorical novel The Pilgrim's Progress.

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden formerly maintained the St. Nicholas School in Egg Harbor. It closed in 2007 with a private elementary school opening in its place.

Notable people

See also (related category): People from Egg Harbor City, New Jersey

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Egg Harbor City include:

  • Lou Bauer (1898–1979), baseball player who played a single major league game, for the Philadelphia Athletics, as a 19-year-old
  • Kathleen Crowley (1929-2017), actress.
  • John D'Agostino (born 1982), professional poker player
  • Louis Kuehnle (1857–1934), entrepreneur and politician who was a pioneer in the early development of Atlantic City
  • Frank Morgenweck (1875–1941), basketball player, coach and administrator, member of the Basketball Hall of Fame
  • Peace Pilgrim (1908–1981, born Mildred Lisette Norman), peace activist honored in Egg Harbor City by Peace Pilgrim Park and by a birthday celebration each year in July
  • Lindsey Petrosh (born 1989), Miss New Jersey 2012
  • Tim Reilly, head coach of the Lafayette Leopards baseball team.
  • Captain Charles Saalmann (1838–1909), infantry captain in the Civil War, Acting Commissary of Subsistence in General William T. Sherman's March to the Sea, vintner

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