Winslow Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Winslow Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Winslow
Train at Winslow Junction
Train at Winslow Junction
Winslow highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Winslow highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Winslow Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Winslow Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated November 26, 1867
Named for Edward Winslow Coffin
Area
 • Total 58.192 sq mi (150.716 km2)
 • Land 57.342 sq mi (148.515 km2)
 • Water 0.850 sq mi (2.201 km2)  1.46%
Area rank 24th of 566 in state
1st of 37 in county
Elevation 135 ft (41 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 39,499
 • Estimate (2015) 39,019
 • Rank 56th of 566 in state
4th of 37 in county
 • Density 688.8/sq mi (265.9/km2)
 • Density rank 414th of 566 in state
34th of 37 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08095
Area code(s) 609, 856
FIPS code 3400781740
GNIS feature ID 0882150
Website www.winslowtownship.com

Winslow Township is a township in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 39,499, reflecting an increase of 4,888 (+14.1%) from the 34,611 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,524 (+15.0%) from the 30,087 counted in the 1990 Census.

Winslow Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 8, 1845, from portions of Gloucester Township. Portions of the township were taken on November 26, 1867, to create Chesilhurst. In 1950, the township annexed a portion of Monroe Township (in Gloucester County).

History

Winslow Township is Camden County's largest municipality at 58 square miles (150 km2). The township got its name from the son of a 19th-century glass factory owner, William Coffin Sr., who bought large tracts of timber in Camden County about six miles west of Hammonton and with his son-in-law in 1929. Thomas Jefferson Perce and William Coffin Jr., built the Winslow Glass Works (his second one in 12 years) in the midst of a thick pine forest. The community was named for Senior Coffin's youngest son, Edward Winslow Coffin.

Winslow Township was incorporated in 1845 from the Township of Gloucester. The township's very first meeting was held at Josiah Albertson's Blue Anchor Inn which was located on what is now Route 73 in the vicinity of St Lucy's Church. During its early years Winslow was known for its thriving glass business which developed as a result of the townships abundant resources of timber, clay, and sand, though by the start of the 20th century the glass industry died throughout Winslow. During the early 20th century, Winslow's population continued to grow until it peaked at a small 11,000 residents by the 1970s. During this time period the majority of Winslow residents were farmers. In 1965, Winslow township started to see an increase in population as the Atlantic City Expressway was completed with an interchange in Winslow at Williamstown Road. The proximity of the interchange drew developers towards the Sicklerville section of the township, where Levitt & Sons would build thousands of homes throughout the 1970s. Between 1970 and 1980 Winslow's population nearly doubled to 20,000 residents.

As of 2006, 80% of the township currently sits in the Pinelands National Reserve, thus restricting future land development. Despite the restriction of development on the reserve, agricultural areas still persist in Winslow.

The township is also served by two area codes, 856 and 609. When area code 609 was split in 1999, the southern/eastern end in the township (primarily with the Hammonton mailing address, Cedar Brook, and a small section of Sickerville) were left in the 609 code, while the other sections closer to Berlin and Williamstown received 856 as their area code.

Landmarks
  • St Lucy's Roman Catholic Church, Route 73. It became a parish in 1961. The Rev. Edward McDaid is pastor.
  • Bates Mills Cemetery is a cemetery located on South Erhke Road in Blue Anchor, New Jersey. Today passersby can observe a number of very old grave stones with hardly visible faded initials engraved upon them. The stones seem to be made from iron ore.
  • Pinelands National Reserve
  • Levitt and Sons Incorporated build Winslow crossing in the 1970s in Sicklerville. The complexes that were built at this time were Primrose Gate, Manor Hall, Victoria Manor, Eden Hollow, Lehigh Manor, Arbor Meadows and Ivy Meadows.
  • In 1972, the Lutheran affiliated Winslow Community Church opens in the Cedarbrook Hunting and Fishing Club.
Historical timeline
  • 1845: Winslow is incorporated from Gloucester Township.
  • 1920: Albion School is built.
  • 1923: Sicklerville School is built.
  • 1925: St. Lucys Roman Catholic Church begins in the Blue Anchor section of Winslow Township as a mission to Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in Berlin, New Jersey.
  • 1928: Blue Anchor and Tansboro Schools are built.
  • 1940: Closed Dunbarton and North Tansboro Schools are sold.
  • 1955: A hospital is established at Ancora.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, township had a total area of 58.192 square miles (150.716 km2), including 57.342 square miles (148.515 km2) of land and 0.850 square miles (2.201 km2) of water (1.46%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located wholly or partially within the township include Albion, Ancora, Braddock, Blue Anchor, Cedar Brook, Dicktown, Elm, Florence, New Freedom, Pen Byrn, Sicklertown, Sicklerville, Spring Garden, Tansboro, Waterford, Waterford Works, West Atco, Williamstown, Winslow Junction and Winslow Village.

The Blue Hole is a body of water in the middle of woods that is clear blue and always cold, even in the summer, with a very steep shoreline and a maximum depth of approximately 70 feet (21 m), though Weird NJ describes the water as "bottomless" and claims that it is a haunt of the Jersey Devil.

The township borders Berlin Borough, Chesilhurst, Pine Hill, Waterford Township in Camden County, both Folsom, Hammonton in Atlantic County, and both Monroe Township and Washington Township in Gloucester County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 1,540
1860 1,800 16.9%
1870 2,050 * 13.9%
1880 2,158 5.3%
1890 2,408 11.6%
1900 2,392 −0.7%
1910 2,919 22.0%
1920 3,379 15.8%
1930 4,744 40.4%
1940 4,866 2.6%
1950 5,102 4.8%
1960 9,142 79.2%
1970 11,202 22.5%
1980 20,034 78.8%
1990 30,087 50.2%
2000 34,611 15.0%
2010 39,599 14.4%
Est. 2015 39,019 −1.5%
Population sources: 1850-2000
1850-1920 1850-1870 1850
1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 39,499 people, 13,735 households, and 10,178 families residing in the township. The population density was 688.8 per square mile (265.9/km2). There were 14,560 housing units at an average density of 253.9 per square mile (98.0/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 54.41% (21,491) White, 36.17% (14,287) Black or African American, 0.29% (113) Native American, 3.10% (1,224) Asian, 0.04% (14) Pacific Islander, 2.97% (1,172) from other races, and 3.03% (1,198) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.10% (3,200) of the population.

There were 13,735 households out of which 35.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.7% were married couples living together, 16.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.9% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.81 and the average family size was 3.25.

In the township, the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 8.1% from 18 to 24, 28.1% from 25 to 44, 27.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.3 years. For every 100 females there were 92.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.6 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $68,169 (with a margin of error of +/- $2,425) and the median family income was $78,892 (+/- $4,026). Males had a median income of $53,815 (+/- $1,828) versus $44,860 (+/- $2,189) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,884 (+/- $974). About 4.1% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 7.3% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 34,611 people, 11,661 households, and 9,002 families residing in the township. The population density was 599.9 people per square mile (231.6/km²). There were 12,413 housing units at an average density of 215.1/sq mi (83.1/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 69.34% White, 29.34% African American, 0.35% Native American, 1.30% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 1.58% from other races, and 1.96% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.31% of the population.

There were 11,661 households out of which 41.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.2% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.8% were non-families. 18.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.87 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the township the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 7.0% from 18 to 24, 34.4% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 8.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.5 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $55,990, and the median income for a family was $62,045. Males had a median income of $43,320 versus $31,657 for females. The per capita income for the township was $21,254. About 4.5% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.1% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 245.16 miles (394.55 km) of roadways, of which 159.89 miles (257.32 km) were maintained by the municipality, 57.57 miles (92.65 km) by Camden County and 16.50 miles (26.55 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 11.20 miles (18.02 km) by the South Jersey Transportation Authority.

Winslow is criss-crossed by several major roads, such as U.S. Route 30, Route 73, and Route 143. The Atlantic City Expressway passes through the southwestern part of the township, with four interchanges: Exits 41, 38, 33, and 31.

Public transportation

NJ Transit bus service is available on the 316 with seasonal service between Cape May and Philadelphia and the 400 route between Sicklerville and Philadelphia. Local service is available on the 459 bus between Voorhees Town Center and the Avandale park-and-ride and the 463 route between Woodbury and the Avandale park-and-ride. Service to Atlantic City is offered on the 551 route between Ocean City and Philadelphia and on the 554 route to the Lindenwold station. There are no buses that provide service within reasonable walking distance to the Municipal Building.

Park and Ride bus service is located within the township at the Avandale park and ride, which offers 322 parking spots for NJ Transit passengers.


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