Paulsboro, New Jersey facts for kids

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Paulsboro, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Paulsboro
The Gill House, now the library
The Gill House, now the library
Map of Paulsboro highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Map of Paulsboro highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Paulsboro, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Paulsboro, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Flag of Gloucester County, New Jersey.png Gloucester
Incorporated March 2, 1904
Named for Samuel Phillip Paul
Area
 • Total 2.605 sq mi (6.745 km2)
 • Land 1.896 sq mi (4.910 km2)
 • Water 0.709 sq mi (1.836 km2)  27.21%
Area rank 367th of 566 in state
16th of 24 in county
Elevation 20 ft (6 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 6,097
 • Estimate (2015) 5,989
 • Rank 342nd of 566 in state
14th of 24 in county
 • Density 3,216.4/sq mi (1,241.9/km2)
 • Density rank 205th of 566 in state
5th of 24 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08066
Area code(s) 856 exchanges: 224, 423, 467, 599
FIPS code 3401557150
GNIS feature ID 0885344
Website www.paulsboronj.org

Paulsboro is a borough in Gloucester County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 6,097, reflecting a decline of 63 (-1.0%) from the 6,160 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 417 (-6.3%) from the 6,577 counted in the 1990 Census.

Paulsboro was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 2, 1904, from portions of Greenwich Township. It was named for Samuel Phillip Paul, son of a settler.

History

THE PAUL HOUSE, PAULSBORO, GLOUCESTER COUNTY
The Paul House, built 1810 or earlier and named for the Paul family who settled in Paulsboro in 1685

Paulsboro is the home of Fort Billingsport, the first land purchase made by the United States, acquired the day after the signing of the United States Declaration of Independence.

Paulsboro is the location of the Tinicum Island Rear Range Lighthouse, first lit on the night of December 31, 1880. In 1997 a local citizen's group was established with the purpose of providing tours and public access to the structure. The lighthouse is one of New Jersey's few publicly accessible aids to navigation and is the centerpiece of Paulsboro's cultural revitalization.

The East Jefferson Street railroad bridge over Mantua Creek was built in 1917 and rebuilt in 1940 for the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines (PRSL). It is now part of Conrail's Penns Grove Secondary. On November 30, 2012 it buckled, causing seven cars of a freight train to derail. One of the four tanker cars that fell into the creek was punctured, leaking thousands of gallons of vinyl chloride. Homes in the borough had to be evacuated and dozens of people went to hospitals as a precautionary measure due to exposure to the chemicals. Some residents in the area have filed suit against Conrail and CSX in Pennsylvania State Court having "complained about respiratory and bronchial related illnesses, headaches, eye and skin irritations and multiple other symptoms." In March 2013, Conrail announced that the bridge would be replaced with an expected September 2014 operational date. Normally, between March 1 and November 30 the bridge is left in the open position for maritime traffic and closed when trains approach. It will remain locked in the closed position until the bridge is replaced. In September 2013, another less serious derailment took place along the Paulsboro Gibbstown border, with one car leaving the tracks on a train consisting mostly of empty tanker cars.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.605 square miles (6.745 km2), including 1.896 square miles (4.910 km2) of land and 0.709 square miles (1.836 km2) of water (27.21%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Billingsport.

The borough borders the Gloucester County municipalities of East Greenwich Township, Greenwich Township, West Deptford Township and the Delaware River.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 750
1890 1,131 50.8%
1910 2,121
1920 4,352 105.2%
1930 7,121 63.6%
1940 7,011 −1.5%
1950 7,842 11.9%
1960 8,121 3.6%
1970 8,084 −0.5%
1980 6,944 −14.1%
1990 6,577 −5.3%
2000 6,160 −6.3%
2010 6,097 −1.0%
Est. 2015 5,989 −1.8%
Population sources: 1880-1890
1910-2000 1910-1920 1910
1910-1930 1930-1990
2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 6,097 people, 2,286 households, and 1,591 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,216.4 per square mile (1,241.9/km2). There were 2,533 housing units at an average density of 1,336.2 per square mile (515.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 54.49% (3,322) White, 36.72% (2,239) Black or African American, 0.34% (21) Native American, 0.71% (43) Asian, 0.07% (4) Pacific Islander, 2.35% (143) from other races, and 5.33% (325) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 8.89% (542) of the population.

There were 2,286 households out of which 33.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 33.7% were married couples living together, 28.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.4% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.16.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 28.3% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 26.6% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 11.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33.7 years. For every 100 females there were 88.4 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 82.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $43,846 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,449) and the median family income was $61,147 (+/- $5,392). Males had a median income of $51,923 (+/- $6,640) versus $37,826 (+/- $5,863) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,061 (+/- $2,252). About 8.2% of families and 12.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.6% of those under age 18 and 9.9% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 6,160 people, 2,353 households, and 1,614 families residing in the borough. The population density was 3,140.8 people per square mile (1,213.5/km2). There were 2,628 housing units at an average density of 1,339.9 per square mile (517.7/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 63.56% White, 31.64% African American, 0.24% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 0.10% Pacific Islander, 1.31% from other races, and 2.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.35% of the population.

There were 2,353 households out of which 33.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 38.0% were married couples living together, 24.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.4% were non-families. 26.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the borough the population was spread out with 28.8% under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 19.3% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 88.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.7 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $35,569, and the median income for a family was $41,359. Males had a median income of $32,313 versus $24,779 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $16,368. About 14.6% of families and 17.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.0% of those under age 18 and 9.2% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 26.02 miles (41.88 km) of roadways, of which 22.58 miles (36.34 km) were maintained by the municipality, 1.62 miles (2.61 km) by Gloucester County and 1.82 miles (2.93 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Interstate 295 passes through the southern tip of Paulsboro and Route 44 also traverses the borough.

Public transportation

NJ Transit bus service is available between Pennsville Township and Philadelphia on the 402 route, with local service offered on the 455 route between Cherry Hill Mall and Woodbury.

Port of Paulsboro

The Port of Paulsboro is located on the Delaware River and Mantua Creek in and around Paulsboro, and is traditionally one of the nation's busiest for marine transfer operations of petroleum products. From 1998 to early 2011, the Valero Energy Corporation operated an oil refinery here, which it sold in a 2010 deal to PBF Energy for $360 million. The port is being redeveloped as an adaptable omniport able to handle a diversity of bulk, break bulk cargo and shipping containers. Studies completed in 2012 concluded that the port is well-suited to become a center for the manufacture, assembly, and transport of wind turbines and platforms for the development of Atlantic Wind Connection The port has also been home to America's largest asphalt refinery, scheduled to close in 2017.


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