Woodbury, New Jersey facts for kids

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Woodbury, New Jersey
City
City of Woodbury
Woodbury Friends' Meetinghouse
Woodbury Friends' Meetinghouse
Motto: "The city you can grow with!"
Map of Woodbury highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Map of Woodbury highlighted within Gloucester County. Inset: Location of Gloucester County in New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Woodbury, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Woodbury, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Flag of Gloucester County, New Jersey.png Gloucester
Founded 1683
Incorporated March 27, 1854
Area
 • Total 2.059 sq mi (5.333 km2)
 • Land 2.009 sq mi (5.203 km2)
 • Water 0.050 sq mi (0.130 km2)  2.43%
Area rank 410th of 566 in state
18th of 24 in county
Elevation 52 ft (16 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 10,174
 • Estimate (2015) 10,020
 • Rank 242nd of 566 in state
10th of 24 in county
 • Density 5,064.0/sq mi (1,955.2/km2)
 • Density rank 110th of 566 in state
1st of 24 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08096-08097
Area code(s) 856
FIPS code 3401582120
GNIS feature ID 0885447
Website woodbury.nj.us

Woodbury is a city in Gloucester County, New Jersey, in the United States. As of the 2010 United States Census the city's population was 10,174, reflecting a decline of 133 (-1.3%) from the 10,307 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 597 (-5.5%) from the 10,904 counted in the 1990 Census. Woodbury is the county seat of Gloucester County.

Woodbury was originally formed as a borough on March 27, 1854, within Deptford Township, based on the results of a referendum held on March 22, 1854. On January 2, 1871, Woodbury was reincorporated as a city, based on the results of a referendum held that day.

The Inspira Health Network is based in Woodbury. The now-defunct Woodbury Country Club operated in Woodbury from 1897 to 2010, closing due to declining membership and mounting debt that led to a bankruptcy filing by the club.

History

Child workers in Woodbury, NJ
Child workers at Woodbury Bottle Works, November 1909. Photographed by Lewis Hine.

As recounted by the historian William McMahon, the Native Americans called the place where the city of Woodbury was to be founded, "Piscozackasing", or, 'place of the black burrs'.

Woodbury was founded in 1683 by Henry Wood, a Quaker from the Northwest of England, who had left Great Britain due to religious persecution. Wood was incarcerated in Lancaster gaol for practicing as a Quaker and left his home in the village of Tottington, near Bury, Lancashire, in a boat to set up a community in the new world where he and his family could practice his religion freely. His surname and his home town went to make up the name of the city he founded – Woodbury.

In 2000, the Borough of Bury, England, and the City of Woodbury were twinned as part of millennium celebrations in both countries. The twinning ceremony was the culmination of a week where more than 300 school children and college students, local dignitaries and local residents from Bury took part in sporting and cultural events held in and around Woodbury with local people. During the week there was a symbolic meeting and reconciliation of the Vicar of Henry Wood's former church in Tottington and the Quaker's meeting house in Woodbury and an ecumenical service attended by many of the residents and visitors.

Paleontological discovery

In 1787, a fossil bone recovered in Woodbury from local Cretaceous strata was discussed by the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia. The remains were only retrospectively identified as dinosaurian, as dinosaurs would not be scientifically recognized as a distinct group of reptiles until Sir Richard Owen presented his treatise on British fossil reptiles to the British Association in August 1841.

Recycling forerunner

Woodbury was the first city in the United States to mandate recycling. This effort was led by then-councilman and later mayor Donald P. Sanderson in the 1970s, and an ordinance was finally passed in December 1980. The idea of towing a "recycling" trailer behind a trash collection vehicle to enable the collection of trash and recyclable material at the same time emerged. Sanderson was asked to speak in municipalities throughout the country and other towns and cities soon followed suit.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 2.059 square miles (5.333 km2), including 2.009 square miles (5.203 km2) of land and 0.050 square miles (0.130 km2) of water (2.43%). Woodbury has a few lakes that feed off of Woodbury Creek.

The city borders Woodbury Heights, West Deptford Township and Deptford Township.

Climate

Woodbury has a humid subtropical climate (Köppen climate classification Cfa) typical of New Jersey with warm summers and cold winters.

Climate data for Woodbury
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 41
(5)
45
(7.2)
54
(12.2)
65
(18.3)
74
(23.3)
82
(27.8)
87
(30.6)
85
(29.4)
78
(25.6)
67
(19.4)
57
(13.9)
46
(7.8)
65.1
(18.38)
Average low °F (°C) 24
(-4.4)
26
(-3.3)
33
(0.6)
42
(5.6)
52
(11.1)
61
(16.1)
67
(19.4)
65
(18.3)
58
(14.4)
46
(7.8)
38
(3.3)
29
(-1.7)
45.1
(7.27)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.71
(94.2)
2.76
(70.1)
4.08
(103.6)
3.95
(100.3)
4.38
(111.3)
3.81
(96.8)
4.52
(114.8)
4.37
(111)
4.11
(104.4)
3.26
(82.8)
3.51
(89.2)
3.49
(88.6)
45.95
(1,167.1)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 1,534
1870 1,965 28.1%
1880 2,298 16.9%
1890 3,911 70.2%
1900 4,087 4.5%
1910 4,642 13.6%
1920 5,801 25.0%
1930 8,172 40.9%
1940 8,306 1.6%
1950 10,931 31.6%
1960 12,453 13.9%
1970 12,408 −0.4%
1980 10,353 −16.6%
1990 10,904 5.3%
2000 10,307 −5.5%
2010 10,174 −1.3%
Est. 2015 10,020 −1.5%
Population sources:
1870-2000 1860-1920
1860-1870 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 10,174 people, 4,088 households, and 2,420 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,064.0 per square mile (1,955.2/km2). There were 4,456 housing units at an average density of 2,217.9 per square mile (856.3/km2)*. The racial makeup of the city was 66.01% (6,716) White, 24.91% (2,534) Black or African American, 0.23% (23) Native American, 1.28% (130) Asian, 0.28% (28) Pacific Islander, 3.19% (325) from other races, and 4.11% (418) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.66% (1,085) of the population.

There were 4,088 households out of which 27.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 36.6% were married couples living together, 17.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.8% were non-families. 35.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 16.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.38 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the city, the population was spread out with 23.5% under the age of 18, 8.7% from 18 to 24, 28.0% from 25 to 44, 25.9% from 45 to 64, and 14.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37.0 years. For every 100 females there were 93.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 90.3 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $58,629 (with a margin of error of +/- $4,598) and the median family income was $74,276 (+/- $7,880). Males had a median income of $57,019 (+/- $3,425) versus $37,363 (+/- $6,910) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,845 (+/- $2,571). About 7.8% of families and 11.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.7% of those under age 18 and 15.0% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 10,307 people, 4,051 households, and 2,588 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,961.4 people per square mile (1,913.2/km2). There were 4,310 housing units at an average density of 2,074.7 per square mile (800.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 72.45% White, 22.83% African American, 0.22% Native American, 0.99% Asian, 0.14% Pacific Islander, 1.28% from other races, and 2.10% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.94% of the population.

There were 4,051 households out of which 32.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.4% were married couples living together, 18.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 36.1% were non-families. 31.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the city the population was spread out with 24.8% under the age of 18, 8.5% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 20.4% from 45 to 64, and 16.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 87.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 82.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $41,827, and the median income for a family was $53,630. Males had a median income of $40,429 versus $30,570 for females. The per capita income for the city was $21,592. About 11.2% of families and 13.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.7% of those under age 18 and 15.4% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 36.26 miles (58.35 km) of roadways, of which 29.15 miles (46.91 km) were maintained by the municipality, 5.04 miles (8.11 km) by Gloucester County and 2.07 miles (3.33 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 45 (Mantua Avenue / Broad Street) enters the city at its southernmost point from West Deptford Township and proceeds for 1.8 miles (2.9 km) before heading along the Deptford Township / West Deptford Township border at the north end of the city.

County Route 551 (Salem Avenue) enters from West Deptford Township in the southwest and proceeds for 0.5 miles (0.80 km) before beginning a concurrency with Route 45.

Public transportation

NJ Transit bus service between the city and Philadelphia is available on the 401 (from Salem), 402 (from Pennsville Township), 410 (from Bridgeton) and 412 (from Sewell) routes, with local service offered on the 455 (Cherry Hill Township to Paulsboro) and 463 (between Woodbury and the Avandale Park/Ride in Winslow Township) routes.

Beginning in the 1860s passenger train service was provided successively by the Camden and Woodbury Railroad, West Jersey Railroad, West Jersey & Seashore Railroad and the Pennsylvania-Reading Seashore Lines ending in the 1971. The station was built in 1883 and renovated in 2000.

A stop on the proposed Glassboro–Camden Line, an 18-mile (28.97 km) diesel multiple unit (DMU) light rail system projected for completion in 2019, is planned.


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