Burlington, Massachusetts facts for kids

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Burlington, Massachusetts
Town
Town Hall
Town Hall
Official seal of Burlington, Massachusetts
Seal
Motto: "Where Technology Goes To Work"
Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts
Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts
Country United States
State Massachusetts
County Middlesex
Settled 1641
Incorporated 1799
Area
 • Total 11.9 sq mi (30.8 km2)
 • Land 11.8 sq mi (30.6 km2)
 • Water 0.1 sq mi (0.2 km2)
Elevation 218 ft (66 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 24,498
 • Density 2,059/sq mi (795.4/km2)
Time zone Eastern (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (UTC-4)
ZIP code 01803
Area code(s) 339 / 781
FIPS code 25-09840
GNIS feature ID 0618219
Website Town of Burlington, Massachusetts

Burlington is a town in Middlesex County, Massachusetts, United States. The population was 24,498 at the 2010 census.

History

Helene Kent House, Burlington MA
Helene Kent House

It is believed that Burlington takes its name from the English town of Bridlington, Yorkshire but this has never been confirmed . It was first settled in 1641 and was officially incorporated on February 28, 1799; several of the early homesteads are still standing, such as the Francis Wyman House, dating from 1666. The town is sited on the watersheds of the Ipswich, Mystic, and Shawsheen rivers. In colonial times up through the late 19th century, there was industry in the mills along Vine Brook, which runs from Lexington to Bedford and then empties into the Shawsheen River.

Burlington Business District
Business District

Burlington is now a suburban industrial town at the junction of the Boston-Merrimack corridor, but for most of its history it was almost entirely agricultural, selling hops and rye to Boston and supplementing that income with small shoe-making shops. Early railroad expansion passed the town by (although the town was serviced by the Middlesex Turnpike), limiting its early development, and Burlington continued to cure hams for the Boston market and produce milk, fruit, and vegetables.

This picture changed drastically, however, as soon as Route 128 was built. The highway kicked off an enormous expansion, and between 1955 and 1965 Burlington was the fastest growing town in the state. In one five-year period, its population tripled as residential and commercial retail development exploded creating the town's present character.

Burlington has graduated many prominent athletes, including four Olympians, and others who have gone to have successful careers in the NHL, NFL, and Major League Baseball.

Geography

Located in the Greater Boston Area of eastern Massachusetts, Burlington is bordered by Bedford on the west, Billerica on the north, Wilmington on the northeast, Woburn on the southeast, and Lexington on the south. Burlington is 12 miles (19 km) south of Lowell, 12 miles (19 km) northwest of Boston, 36 miles (58 km) southeast of Fitchburg, and 224 miles (360 km) from New York City. and Its highest point is Greenleaf Mountain (290 feet (88 m) above sea level), the lowest point is the Great Meadow 150 feet (46 m) above sea level. The elevation at Town Hall is 220 feet (67 m) above sea level. The largest body of water is the 500-million-US-gallon (1,900,000 m3) Mill Pond Reservoir in the eastern part of the town.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town has a total area of 11.9 square miles (31 km2), of which 11.8 square miles (31 km2) is land and 0.1 square miles (0.26 km2), or 0.59%, is water.

Demographics

See also: List of Massachusetts locations by per capita income
Historical population
Year Pop. ±%
1850 545 —    
1860 606 +11.2%
1870 626 +3.3%
1880 711 +13.6%
1890 617 −13.2%
1900 593 −3.9%
1910 591 −0.3%
1920 885 +49.7%
1930 1,722 +94.6%
1940 2,275 +32.1%
1950 3,250 +42.9%
1960 12,852 +295.4%
1970 21,980 +71.0%
1980 23,486 +6.9%
1990 23,302 −0.8%
2000 22,876 −1.8%
2010 24,498 +7.1%
* = population estimate.
Source: United States Census records and Population Estimates Program data.

As of the census of 2010, there were 24,498 people, 9,668 households, and 6,374 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,936.4 people per square mile (747.9/km²). There were 8,445 housing units at an average density of 2,087.7 per square mile (276.1/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 79.2% White, 3.3% Black or African American, 0.1% Native American, 13.4% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.32% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.4% of the population.

There were 8,289 households out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.2% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.1% were non-families. 19.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.18.

In the town, the population was spread out with 23.6% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 31.1% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.7 males.

In 2014, the median household income of the town stood at $95,465. The per capita income was $41,849 and 4.7% of the population lived below the poverty line. According to an earlier estimate from 2007, the median income for a household in the town was $86,052, and the median income for a family was $99,123. Males had a median income of $55,635 versus $36,486 for females. About 1.3% of families and 1.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and 1.8% of those age 65 or over.

Foreign-born population

As of 2014, 19.5% of the residents of Burlington were born outside of the United States.

Arts and culture

Points of interest

  • The Burlington Town Common and Simonds Park are in the center of town and there are multiple parks and public recreation facilities throughout town which have basketball courts, tennis courts, baseball fields, soccer fields, gymnasia, an indoor skating rink (Burlington Ice Palace) and a skatepark.
  • The Burlington Public Library is on Sears Street adjoining the Town Common.
  • The Burlington Historical Museum is located on Bedford Street at the intersection of Cambridge Street.
  • The Meeting House of the Second Parish in Woburn is on Lexington Street, just off of the Town Common.
  • The Mill Pond Conservation Area is in the eastern part of town bordering Woburn and Wilmington. The largest conservation area in Burlington, the Mill Pond Conservation Area includes over 140 acres (0.57 km2) of rolling and steep terrain. Numerous marked and unmarked trails cross through the conservation area. These trails allow for long enjoyable hiking or biking experiences. The land has numerous access points, including the corner of Winter and Chestnut Streets, through a gate at the end of Hansen Avenue, and through a gate at the end of the offshoot from Town Line Road.
    • The Mill Pond is located within the Mill Pond Conservation Area. Fishing is allowed with special permit. The pond is feeding one of the two water treatment plants in Burlington. The Mill Pond Water Treatment Plant was upgraded in 2007 and has the capacity to treat up to 6 million US gallons (23,000 m3) of water per day. On the pond's island there is a rope swing, an attraction for many locals.
  • The Burlington Landlocked Forest, also known as the Burlington Landlocked Parcel, consists of 270 acres (1.1 km2) spanning the borders of Burlington, Bedford, and Lexington, and contains 12 miles (19 km) of hiking-mountain biking trails, vernal pools, abundant wildlife, historic stone walls and other structures, meadows, and old-growth forest. The majority of the land is owned by the Town of Burlington, which has kept it as open space since acquiring it by eminent domain in 1985. It borders Route 3 in Burlington to the east, Route 62 in Bedford to the north, conservation land in Lexington to the west and Route 128 to the South. The main trail head to the Forest is located at the intersection of Routes 3 and 62 in Bedford. A secondary trail head can be found on Turning Mill Road in Lexington, under the power lines at the site of the future West Lexington Greenway. The Landlocked Parcel is currently not protected land and there were discussions in 2008 between the Town of Burlington and Patriot Partners to sell the land to the developer who would develop part of the forest to build a large biotechnology complex. A citizen group, Friends of the Burlington Landlocked Forest, has been organized to prevent this sale and to make the Forest designated conservation land.
  • Mary Cummings Park was envisioned as one of the great public parks of Greater Boston, but it fell into great neglect. This over 200-acre (0.81 km2) public park on the Burlington-Woburn border was created by Mary P.C. Cummings 1927 and was entrusted to the City of Boston to be kept forever open as a recreational park. In recent years, the City of Boston has tried to discourage public access and has investigated selling the park to fund the Rose Kennedy Greenway. The Burlington RC Flyers maintain a field in the park.
  • The Kevin James movie Paul Blart: Mall Cop was filmed in the Burlington Mall, and scenes from the Ben Affleck movie The Company Men were filmed in an office building off of Wall Street, near Route 128.

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