Glen Rock, New Jersey facts for kids

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Glen Rock, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Glen Rock
Glen Rock–Boro Hall station NJ Transit station. Glen Rock is served by both the Bergen County Line (above) and the Main Line.
Glen Rock–Boro Hall station NJ Transit station. Glen Rock is served by both the Bergen County Line (above) and the Main Line.
Map highlighting Glen Rock's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Glen Rock's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Glen Rock, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Glen Rock, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated September 14, 1894
Named for Prominent glacial boulder
Area
 • Total 2.738 sq mi (7.091 km2)
 • Land 2.714 sq mi (7.028 km2)
 • Water 0.024 sq mi (0.063 km2)  0.89%
Area rank 360th of 566 in state
33rd of 70 in county
Elevation 131 ft (40 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 11,601
 • Estimate (2015) 11,999
 • Rank 209th of 566 in state
28th of 70 in county
 • Density 4,275.2/sq mi (1,650.7/km2)
 • Density rank 139th of 566 in state
35th of 70 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07452
Area code(s) 201
FIPS code 3400326640
GNIS feature ID 0885233
Website www.glenrocknj.net

Glen Rock is a borough in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 11,601, reflecting an increase of 55 (+0.5%) from the 11,546 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 663 (+6.1%) from the 10,883 counted in the 1990 Census.

History

Glen Rock was formed on September 14, 1894, from portions of Ridgewood Township and Saddle River Township, "that being the year the county went crazy on boroughs". The borough was formed during the "Boroughitis" phenomenon then sweeping through Bergen County, in which 26 boroughs were formed in the county in 1894 alone. The main impetus for the break from Ridgewood Township was the decision to have Glen Rock students attend a new school closer to the center of Ridgewood instead of their one-room schoolhouse located at the intersection of Ackerman Avenue and Rock Road.

Glen Rock was settled around a large boulder in a small valley (glen), from which it gets its name. The boulder, weighing in at 570 short tons (520 t) and located where Doremus Avenue meets Rock Road, is believed to have been carried to the site by a glacier that picked up the rock 15,000 years ago near Peekskill, New York and carried it for 20 miles (32 km) to its present location. The Lenape Native Americans called the boulder "Pamachapuka" (meaning "stone from heaven" or "stone from the sky") and used it for signal fires and as a trail marker.

The borough was the site of one of Bergen County's most serious public transportation accidents. In 1911, a trolley operator for the North Jersey Rapid Transit Company, one day away from retirement, died in a crash with an opposing trolley around the intersection of Prospect and Grove Streets that was caused by signal problems. In addition to the death of the opposing trolley operator, 12 people were injured. This crash in part hastened the demise of this transportation mode which ran from Elmwood Park, New Jersey to Suffern, New York and competed with the Erie Railroad. The right of way for this trolley line was purchased by the Public Service Enterprise Group and is still visible today.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.738 square miles (7.091 km2), including 2.714 square miles (7.028 km2) of land and 0.024 square miles (0.063 km2) of water (0.89%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Ferndale.

The borough borders Fair Lawn, Paramus and Ridgewood in Bergen County, and Hawthorne in Passaic County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 613
1910 1,055 72.1%
1920 2,181 106.7%
1930 4,369 100.3%
1940 5,177 18.5%
1950 7,145 38.0%
1960 12,896 80.5%
1970 13,011 0.9%
1980 11,497 −11.6%
1990 10,883 −5.3%
2000 11,546 6.1%
2010 11,601 0.5%
Est. 2015 11,999 3.4%
Population sources:
1900-1920 1900-1910
1910-1930 1900-2010
2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 11,601 people, 3,917 households, and 3,290 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,275.2 per square mile (1,650.7/km2). There were 4,016 housing units at an average density of 1,480.0 per square mile (571.4/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 87.16% (10,111) White, 1.37% (159) Black or African American, 0.09% (10) Native American, 9.09% (1,054) Asian, 0.03% (3) Pacific Islander, 0.62% (72) from other races, and 1.66% (192) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.54% (527) of the population.

There were 3,917 households out of which 46.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.4% were married couples living together, 6.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.0% were non-families. 14.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.96 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 30.0% under the age of 18, 5.1% from 18 to 24, 19.7% from 25 to 44, 32.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.2 years. For every 100 females there were 94.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 90.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $140,882 (with a margin of error of +/- $13,445) and the median family income was $160,360 (+/- $10,024). Males had a median income of $110,506 (+/- $13,238) versus $64,250 (+/- $11,788) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $61,013 (+/- $6,466). About 1.1% of families and 1.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.6% of those under age 18 and 2.2% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed 20 households in 2010, an increase from the 15 counted in 2000.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 11,546 people, 3,977 households, and 3,320 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,246.1 people per square mile (1,638.9/km2). There were 4,024 housing units at an average density of 1,479.9 per square mile (571.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 90.07% White, 1.81% African American, 0.16% Native American, 6.48% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.61% from other races, and 0.86% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.72% of the population.

There were 3,977 households out of which 43.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.1% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 16.5% were non-families. 14.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.89 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the borough the age distribution of the population shows 29.4% under the age of 18, 3.9% from 18 to 24, 27.4% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 13.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.5 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $104,192, and the median income for a family was $111,280. Males had a median income of $84,614 versus $52,430 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $45,091. About 2.1% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 3.8% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 44.67 miles (71.89 km) of roadways, of which 35.23 miles (56.70 km) were maintained by the municipality, 8.87 miles (14.27 km) by Bergen County, and 0.57 miles (0.92 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Glen Rock is served by Route 208, which runs southeast to northwest from Fair Lawn to Oakland.

Public transportation

Glen Rock has two separate NJ Transit train stations: Glen Rock–Main Line station on the Main Line located at Rock Road and Main Street, and Glen Rock–Boro Hall station on the Bergen County Line at Harding Plaza between Maple Avenue and Rock Road. Both lines provide service to Hoboken Terminal, with transfers available at Secaucus Junction to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and to most of NJ Transit's other train lines.

NJ Transit provides bus service to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 148 (on Route 208), 164, and 196 (also on Route 208) bus lines, service to the George Washington Bridge Bus Station on the 175, and local service on the 722 (on Lincoln Avenue) and 746 bus lines.

Culture

In October 2005, many scenes of prominent locations in town were shot for the film World Trade Center, starring Nicolas Cage and directed by Oliver Stone, with Glen Rock having had 11 residents who were killed in the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

The Hendrick Hopper House is a historic building located on the corner of Ackerman and Hillman Avenues. The site was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1983 as site #83001526.

Glen Rock is home to an architecturally prominent Sikh gurudwara; while up to 90% of the borough's Indian American constituency was estimated by one member in 2014 to have moved to Glen Rock within the preceding two-year period alone. In February 2015, the Glen Rock Board of Education voted to designate the Hindu holy day Diwali as an annual school holiday.


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