Montville, New Jersey facts for kids

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Montville, New Jersey
Township
Township of Montville
Entering Montville
Entering Montville
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Montville, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Montville, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated April 11, 1867
Named for Mandeville Inn or terrain
Area
 • Total 19.056 sq mi (49.354 km2)
 • Land 18.480 sq mi (47.862 km2)
 • Water 0.576 sq mi (1.492 km2)  3.02%
Area rank 148th of 566 in state
11th of 39 in county
Elevation 279 ft (85 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 21,528
 • Estimate (2015) 21,850
 • Rank 119th of 566 in state
7th of 39 in county
 • Density 1,165.0/sq mi (449.8/km2)
 • Density rank 359th of 566 in state
25th of 39 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07045
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3402747670
GNIS feature ID 0882207
Website www.montvillenj.org

Montville is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 21,528, reflecting an increase of 689 (+3.3%) from the 20,839 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 5,239 (+33.6%) from the 15,600 counted in the 1990 Census.

Montville was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 11, 1867, from portions of Pequannock Township.

In Money magazine's 2013 Best Places to Live rankings, Montville was ranked 13th in the nation, the second-highest among the three places in New Jersey included in the top 50 list. The township was ranked 17th in the magazine's 2011 ranking of the "Best Places to Live", the highest-ranked place in New Jersey, after having been ranked 13th in 2007.

History

The area now known as Montville Township was first settled by Dutch farmers from New Amsterdam (now part of New York City) in the very early 18th century. Part of New Netherland, the town was originally called "Uyle-Kill" (the Dutch spelling of "Owl-Kill"), a name given to the creek and valley, which ran through the area. By the 1740s, the settlement had grown in size and construction of the first road was begun. The early road, now known as U.S. Route 202, connected various farms with Montville's first gristmill, sawmill and tanneries. The Dutch Reformed Church was founded in Old Boonton in 1756 and moved to Montville in the early 1800s after land was purchased here for a parsonage.

During the American Revolutionary War, Montville was on a major military route from Morristown to the Hudson River. General George Washington's troops often took this route and Washington stayed in the Towaco section of what is now Montville Township in June 1780. The French troops under the leadership of General Rochambeau spent four days passing through Montville Township on their way to the War's final victory at Yorktown, Virginia, as part of a group of 5,000 soldiers, 2,000 horses, 500 oxen, possibly 900 cattle, artillery, boats and followers.

Montville was officially named with specific boundaries April 1800. The name came from the Mandeville Inn, which was established around 1770 and was pronounced "Mondeveil" by the Dutch, which in turn was corrupted to Montville. The Montville Inn was, up until July 2006, located at the site of the pre-Revolutionary War Mandeville Inn, which burned down in the early Twentieth Century. Other sources attribute the township's name to its location in the mountains of Northern New Jersey.

The construction of the Morris Canal in this area was completed in 1828, bringing commercial navigation to the Montville/Towaco area. The mid-19th century saw the development of two smaller village centers set apart from Montville: Pine Brook, a fertile agricultural area in the Township's southern end, and Towaco, situated on the Morris Canal.

In 2009, Money magazine named Montville the 21st best place to live in the United States; the 2nd highest ranked community in New Jersey.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 19.056 square miles (49.354 km2), including 18.480 square miles (47.862 km2) of land and 0.576 square miles (1.492 km2) of water (3.02%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Horse Neck Bridge, Lake Valhalla, Lower Montville, Pine Brook, Taylortown, Towaco and White Hall.

The lowest recorded temperature in Montville is −25 °F (−32 °C), set in February 1943, and the highest recorded temperature is 105 °F (41 °C), set in July 1936 and 2011.

Climate data for Montville, New Jersey
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 71
(21.7)
74
(23.3)
85
(29.4)
93
(33.9)
96
(35.6)
99
(37.2)
105
(40.6)
100
(37.8)
100
(37.8)
92
(33.3)
81
(27.2)
73
(22.8)
105
(40.6)
Average high °F (°C) 36
(2.2)
39
(3.9)
48
(8.9)
60
(15.6)
71
(21.7)
79
(26.1)
84
(28.9)
82
(27.8)
75
(23.9)
64
(17.8)
53
(11.7)
41
(5)
61
(16.11)
Average low °F (°C) 15
(-9.4)
17
(-8.3)
25
(-3.9)
35
(1.7)
45
(7.2)
54
(12.2)
59
(15)
57
(13.9)
49
(9.4)
37
(2.8)
30
(-1.1)
21
(-6.1)
37
(2.78)
Record low °F (°C) −24
(-31.1)
−25
(-31.7)
−10
(-23.3)
11
(-11.7)
24
(-4.4)
29
(-1.7)
36
(2.2)
32
(0)
24
(-4.4)
10
(-12.2)
−1
(-18.3)
−17
(-27.2)
−25
(-31.7)
Precipitation inches (mm) 4.34
(110.2)
3.44
(87.4)
4.56
(115.8)
4.54
(115.3)
4.79
(121.7)
4.51
(114.6)
4.64
(117.9)
4.43
(112.5)
5.11
(129.8)
4.10
(104.1)
4.53
(115.1)
4.08
(103.6)
53.07
(1,348)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 1,403
1880 1,270 −9.5%
1890 1,333 5.0%
1900 1,908 43.1%
1910 1,944 1.9%
1920 1,515 −22.1%
1930 2,467 62.8%
1940 3,207 30.0%
1950 4,159 29.7%
1960 6,772 62.8%
1970 11,846 74.9%
1980 14,290 20.6%
1990 15,600 9.2%
2000 20,839 33.6%
2010 21,528 3.3%
Est. 2015 21,850 1.5%
Population sources:1870-1920
1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 21,528 people, 7,485 households, and 5,988 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,165.0 per square mile (449.8/km2). There were 7,823 housing units at an average density of 423.3 per square mile (163.4/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 78.04% (16,800) White, 1.28% (275) Black or African American, 0.10% (22) Native American, 18.07% (3,890) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 0.86% (186) from other races, and 1.64% (353) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.18% (900) of the population.

There were 7,485 households out of which 39.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.9% were married couples living together, 7.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.0% were non-families. 17.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the township, the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 22.0% from 25 to 44, 31.7% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.0 years. For every 100 females there were 95.7 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 90.9 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $119,493 (with a margin of error of +/- $12,959) and the median family income was $143,811 (+/- $17,082). Males had a median income of $102,178 (+/- $5,041) versus $66,933 (+/- $6,419) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $54,618 (+/- $3,849). About 2.6% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 4.4% of those age 65 or over.

Montville has had a growing influx of Asian-Americans In 2010, 7.1% of Montville's residents self-identified as Indian-American, while 6.4% identified as Chinese-American and 2.7% of residents were Korean-American.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 20,839 people, 7,380 households, and 5,867 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,104.3 people per square mile (426.4/km²). There were 7,541 housing units at an average density of 399.6 per square mile (154.3/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 84.95% White, 0.93% African American, 0.04% Native American, 12.57% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.36% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.55% of the population.

There were 7,380 households out of which 37.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.0% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.5% were non-families. 16.6% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the township the population was spread out with 25.2% under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 30.6% from 25 to 44, 28.0% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 94.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.9 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $94,557, and the median income for a family was $105,394. Males had a median income of $71,356 versus $45,427 for females. The per capita income for the township was $43,341. About 2.6% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.4% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 121.75 miles (195.94 km) of roadways, of which 100.98 miles (162.51 km) were maintained by the municipality, 13.91 miles (22.39 km) by Morris County and 6.86 miles (11.04 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Major routes that pass through include Interstate 287 and U.S. Route 202 in the north, and both Interstate 80 and U.S. Route 46 in the south. Both interstates houses interchanges in the township.

Public transportation

As part of its Midtown Direct expansion program, NJ Transit, with supplemental funding from the Township of Montville, renovated the Towaco train station using a design hearkening back to the early 1900s. Service is provided on the Montclair-Boonton Line from Towaco to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan via a transfer in Montclair through Newark to Manhattan.

NJ Transit offers bus service to and from Newark on the 29 route, with local service available on the 871 and 874 routes, replacing service that had been offered on the MCM1 route until 2010, when subsidies to the local provider were eliminated as part of budget cuts.

Lakeland Bus Lines offers service along Route 46 between Dover and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan and along Route 80 between Newton and New York City.

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