Overland Park, Kansas facts for kids

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Overland Park, Kansas
City
OPK beltway2.JPG
Location within Johnson County and Kansas
Location within Johnson County and Kansas
KDOT map of Johnson County (legend)
KDOT map of Johnson County (legend)
Country United States
State Kansas
County Johnson
Incorporated 1960
Area
 • Total 75.6 sq mi (195.22 km2)
 • Land 74.84 sq mi (193.84 km2)
 • Water 0.53 sq mi (1.38 km2)
Elevation 1,086 ft (331 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 173,372
 • Estimate (2015) 186,515
 • Rank US: 128th
 • Density 2,293.3/sq mi (888.085/km2)
Time zone CST (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
Area code 913
FIPS code 20-53775
GNIS ID 0479210
Website opkansas.org

Overland Park /ˈvərlənd ˈpɑːrk/ is the second most populous city in the U.S. state of Kansas. Located in Johnson County, it is also the second most populous city in the Kansas City metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 173,372.

History

See also: History of Kansas

The city traces its roots to 1905, with the arrival of its founder, William B. Strang Jr.

The city was incorporated as a "first class city" on May 20, 1960. Its initial population was 28,085 and was bounded by Antioch Road (west), 107th Street (south), Chadwick (east) and I-35 (north) with 13 square miles (33.7 km2) incorporated. By 1990 the population was 111,790 and in 1995 the incorporated land area was 56.6 square miles (146.6 km2). Since 1995, the population has grown to 173,250 in 2008 with 75.33 square miles (195.10 km2) of land area. Overland Park is now the second most populous city in Kansas. (Wichita is the largest.)

In early 2008, the city council voted to annex an additional 15 square miles (39 km2) south of existing city limits. The annexation was approved for an additional 8 miles (13 km) and went into effect March 10. After the annexation, the city spans nearly the entire distance between the northern and southern borders of Johnson County.

Geography

Overland-park-map
Detailed map of Overland Park

Downtown Overland Park is located in northeastern Kansas at the junction of Interstate 435 and U.S. Route 69, central Overland Park is roughly 13 miles (21 km) south-southwest of downtown Kansas City, Missouri and immediately east of Olathe, the county seat.

The city lies on the northern edge of the Osage Plains a few miles south of the Kansas River. One of the river's tributaries, Turkey Creek, flows northeast through the extreme northern part of the city. South of Turkey Creek, the majority of the city lies in the watershed of the Blue River. Several of the river's tributaries run east-northeast across the city; from north to south, these include Indian Creek, Tomahawk Creek, and Negro Creek. In the far southern part of the city, two more tributaries, Coffee Creek and Wolf Creek, join to form the main stem of the Blue River itself.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 75.37 square miles (195.22 km²) of which 74.84 square miles (193.84 km²) is land and 0.53 square mile (1.38 km²) is water.

As a suburb of Kansas City, Overland Park is part of the Kansas City metropolitan area, and it borders other communities on all sides. These include Kansas City, Kansas, to the north, Mission and Prairie Village to the northeast, Leawood to the east, Stilwell to the south, Olathe and Lenexa to the west, and Shawnee and Merriam to the northwest. Most of Overland Park, specifically the part of it lying north of 159th Street, lies within the area of Johnson County referred to as Shawnee Mission.

Climate

Overland Park lies in the transition zone between North America's humid subtropical climate and humid continental climate zones, typically experiencing hot, humid summers and cold, dry winters.

Climate data for Overland Park, Kansas
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 74
(23.3)
81
(27.2)
85
(29.4)
91
(32.8)
95
(35)
105
(40.6)
114
(45.6)
107
(41.7)
106
(41.1)
98
(36.7)
84
(28.9)
76
(24.4)
114
(45.6)
Average high °F (°C) 38
(3.3)
45
(7.2)
56
(13.3)
67
(19.4)
76
(24.4)
84
(28.9)
89
(31.7)
88
(31.1)
80
(26.7)
69
(20.6)
54
(12.2)
42
(5.6)
66
(18.9)
Average low °F (°C) 20
(-6.7)
25
(-3.9)
35
(1.7)
45
(7.2)
55
(12.8)
64
(17.8)
69
(20.6)
67
(19.4)
58
(14.4)
47
(8.3)
35
(1.7)
24
(-4.4)
45
(7.2)
Record low °F (°C) −18
(-27.8)
−12
(-24.4)
−8
(-22.2)
13
(-10.6)
30
(-1.1)
43
(6.1)
48
(8.9)
46
(7.8)
30
(-1.1)
18
(-7.8)
1
(-17.2)
−22
(-30)
−22
(-30)
Precipitation inches (mm) 1.26
(32)
1.27
(32.3)
2.74
(69.6)
3.78
(96)
5.41
(137.4)
5.22
(132.6)
4.03
(102.4)
3.56
(90.4)
4.69
(119.1)
3.48
(88.4)
2.97
(75.4)
1.76
(44.7)
40.17
(1,020.3)
Snowfall inches (cm) 5.70
(14.48)
4.00
(10.16)
2.90
(7.37)
0.50
(1.27)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.10
(0.25)
1.10
(2.79)
3.00
(7.62)
17.30
(43.94)

Surrounding cities

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 21,110
1970 76,623 263.0%
1980 81,784 6.7%
1990 111,790 36.7%
2000 149,080 33.4%
2010 173,372 16.3%
Est. 2015 186,515 7.6%
U.S. Decennial Census
2015 Estimate

2010 census

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 173,372 people, 71,443 households, and 45,516 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,316.5 people per square mile (894.4/km²). There were 76,280 housing units at an average density of 1,019.2 per square mile (393.5/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 84.4% White, 4.3% African American, 0.3% American Indian, 6.3% Asian, 2.1% from other races, and 2.5% from two or more races. Hispanics and Latinos of any race were 6.3% of the population.

There were 71,443 households of which 30.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.0% were married couples living together, 8.4% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.2% had a male householder with no wife present, and 36.3% were non-families. 29.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41, and the average family size was 3.04.

The median age in the city was 37.8 years. 24.7% of residents were under the age of 18; 7.4% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 28.2% were from 25 to 44; 27.6% were from 45 to 64; and 12.3% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.3% male and 51.7% female.

The median income for a household in the city was $71,513, and the median income for a family was $93,293. Males had a median income of $65,210 versus $43,413 for females. The per capita income for the city was $39,319. 4.9% of the population and 3.3% of families were living below the poverty line, including 6.5% of those under the age of 18 and 4.9% of those 65 and older.

Metropolitan area

Overland Park is a principal city of both the Kansas City, MO-KS Metropolitan Statistical Area and the Kansas City-Overland Park-Kansas City, MO-KS Combined Statistical Area.

Parks and recreation

Overland Park has more than 1,800 acres (7.3 km2) of park land and open space. Many of the city's 72 parks feature one or more of the following: public golf, sand volleyball, hiking and biking trails, playgrounds, tennis courts, basketball courts, and reservable shelters.

The Memorial Sports Complex was named after long-time resident and coach Dwight Milton Jordan.

Culture

Points of interest

DwntwnOPKS
Downtown Overland Park (2016)
Waterfall and Flowers, OP Arboretum
Waterfall and Flowers at the Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens.

The city is home to Overland Park Arboretum and Botanical Gardens, a 300 acres (120 ha) arboretum and botanical garden. The Oak Park Mall is one of the area's top shopping locations with nearly 200 stores. Continuing development in the Corbin Park area has added more stores and restaurants.

The Deanna Rose Children's Farmstead is a 12-acre (49,000 m2) farm with animals, hay rides, a fishing pond, an early 1900s school house, and a children's gold mining camp.

The Overland Park Golf Division operates two public golf courses: St. Andrews Golf Club and the Sykes Lady Golf Club. These courses host more than 130,000 rounds of golf a year.

Scheels Overland Park Soccer Complex was named the top soccer facility in the nation by Livability because it is considered the only complex of its kind in the United States. It covers 96 acres (39 ha) and offers 12 lighted, regulation size synthetic, turf fields with a cooling system to control turf temperature on hot days.

The city is also home to Overland Park Convention Center.

In 2015, Topgolf driving range and entertainment complex opened in Overland Park. It offers a driving range, bar, and restaurant complex, and employs more than 450 people.

Historic Downtown Overland Park contains a farmers' market, the clocktower plaza and a statue of Overland Park City founder William B. Strang Jr. It also hosts the Strang Carriage House and is home to the Overland Park Historical Society.

The Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art is on the campus of Johnson County Community College.

The city has numerous public art works installed under the Public Art Program.

There are three community centers in the city: Matt Ross Community Center, the Jewish Community Center, and Tomahawk Ridge Community Center.

Religion

Overland Park is highly populated by Protestants, reflective of the overall population of the state of Kansas. Large Baptist, Methodist, Nazarene and Pentecostal churches dot the landscape of Overland Park as well as its neighboring suburbs. Overland Park is also home to a relatively small Muslim population. The Islamic Center of Johnson County serves as a mosque and a community center for Muslims in Overland Park. There is also a growing Hindu, Sikh, and Buddhist population in Overland Park and surrounding areas.

Overland Park is also served by a number of synagogues: Congregation Beth Israel Abraham Voliner, an Orthodox synagogue established in Kansas City, Missouri, in 1894. Other Orthodox synagogues include the Chabad House Center which serves as the Chabad Headquarters for Kansas and Missouri, and the Torah Learning Center. There are several other synagogues, too, including Kehilath Israel, Congregation Beth Torah, The Temple, and Congregation B'nai Jehudah.

Also, Overland Park is home to a significant number of Roman Catholics. Overland Park falls within the boundaries of the Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas. Parishes such as St. Michael the Archangel, Holy Trinity, Holy Cross, Holy Spirit, Ascension and Queen of the Holy Rosary serve Catholics in Overland Park. Holy Cross offers a Spanish mass for the Hispanic community in the city.

In popular culture and the arts

The city has developed a positive reputation in American media as an affordable and family-friendly community. CNNMoney.com has consistently ranked Overland Park in the top 10 of its 100 Best Places to Live in the United States. In 2015 Forbes ranked the city among the 25 Best Suburbs for retirement. In 2015 Overland Park was named No 1 in the nation for "Top 10 Best Cities for Families". It was also recognized as No. 15 for "America's 50 Best Cities to Live " by 24/7 Wall Street. Overland Park was also awarded the No. 1 city in the country for first time home buyers in 2015 by WalletHub citing its low crime rate and outstanding schools. BusinessWeek ranked the city as one of "The Best Places to Raise Your Kids", and U.S. News & World Report ranked it among "America's 10 Best Places to Grow Up". In 2014, Housing Wire ranked Overland Park number three in its list of "The 10 absolute best housing markets for families".

Overland Park was the setting of the 2008 documentary series High School Confidential and the 2009-2011 television series, United States of Tara. It is also the setting of the popular web series The Most Popular Girls in School.

Sister cities

Overland Park has one sister city.

Images for kids


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