Kansas City, Kansas facts for kids

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Kansas City, Kansas
City
Fountains at Kansas Legends Outlets in the Village West district in Kansas City, Kansas
Fountains at Kansas Legends Outlets in the Village West district in Kansas City, Kansas
Official seal of Kansas City, Kansas
Seal
Nickname(s): "KCK"
Location within Wyandotte County and Kansas
Location within Wyandotte County and Kansas
Country United States
State Kansas
County Wyandotte Leavenworth
Incorporated 1872, 1886
Area
 • Total 128.38 sq mi (332.50 km2)
 • Land 124.81 sq mi (323.26 km2)
 • Water 3.57 sq mi (9.25 km2)
Elevation 869 ft (265 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 145,786
 • Estimate (2013) 148,483
 • Density 1,135.58/sq mi (438.454/km2)
Time zone CST (UTC–6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC–5)
ZIP Code 66101-66113, 66115, 66117-66119, 66160
Area code 913
FIPS code 20-36000
GNIS feature ID 0478635
Website wycokck.org

Kansas City (often abbreviated as "KCK" to differentiate it from Kansas City, Missouri) is the third-largest city in the state of Kansas, the county seat of Wyandotte County, and the third-largest city of the Kansas City metropolitan area. It is part of a consolidated city-county government known as the "Unified Government". Wyandotte County also includes the independent cities of Bonner Springs and Edwardsville. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 145,786 residents. It is situated at Kaw Point, which is the junction of the Missouri and Kansas rivers.

History

See also: History of Kansas

In October 1872, "old" Kansas City, Kansas, was incorporated. The first city election was held on October 22 of that year, by order of Judge Hiram Stevens of the Tenth Judicial District, and resulted in the election of Mayor James Boyle. The mayors of the city after its organization were James Boyle, C. A. Eidemiller, A. S. Orbison, Eli Teed and Samuel McConnell. In June 1880, the Governor of Kansas proclaimed the city of Kansas City a city of the second class with Mayor McConnell present.

In March 1886, "new" Kansas City, Kansas, was formed through the consolidation of five municipalities: "old" Kansas City, Armstrong, Armourdale, Riverview, Wyandotte. The oldest city of the group was Wyandotte, which was formed in 1857 by Wyandot Native Americans and Methodist missionaries.

In the 1890s, the city saw an explosive growth in population as a streetcar suburb of Kansas City, Missouri, from which it takes its name; this growth continued until the 1930s. It was one of the nation's 100 largest cities for many U.S. Census counts, from 1890 to 1960, including 1920, when it had a population of over 100,000 residents for the first time.

As with adjacent Kansas City, Missouri, the percentage of the city's most populous ethnic group, non-Hispanic whites, has declined from 76.3% in 1970 to 40.2% in 2010. In 1997, voters approved a proposition to unify the city and county governments creating the Unified Government of Wyandotte County.

Geography

Kck-map
Kansas City map

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 128.38 square miles (332.50 km2), of which, 124.81 square miles (323.26 km2) is land and 3.57 square miles (9.25 km2) is water.

Neighborhoods

See also: Neighborhoods of Kansas City, Missouri and Kansas City, Kansas

Neighborhoods of Kansas City, Kansas, include the following:

  • Downtown
  • Argentine − former home to the silver smelter for which it was named; it was consolidated with Kansas City in 1910.
  • Armourdale − formerly a city, it was consolidated with the city of Kansas City in 1886.
  • Armstrong − a town absorbed by Wyandotte.
  • Bethel − a neighborhood located generally along Leavenworth Rd., between 72nd and 77th Streets. It was never incorporated as a municipality.
  • Fairfax District − an industrial area along the Missouri River.
  • Muncie
  • Maywood − until the late 1990s, Maywood was a quiet, isolated residential area; it is now part of the "Village West" project that includes the Legends shopping and entertainment district, the Children's Mercy Park soccer stadium, T-Bones' Community America baseball park, the Schlitterbahn amusement water park, the Kansas Speedway racetrack and Hollywood Casino.
  • Nearman
  • Piper
  • Pomeroy − a late 19th century-early 20th century Train Depot, Trading Post, Saw Mill, and river landing for barges to load and unload.
  • Riverview
  • Rosedale − merged with Kansas City in 1922.
  • Stony Point
  • Strawberry Hill
  • Turner − community around the Wyandotte-Johnson County border to the Kansas River north-south, and from I-635 to I-435 east-west.
  • Vinewood
    Kaw-point-aerial
    Kaw Point from the west
  • Wolcott
  • Welborn

Parks and parkways

  • City Park
  • Wyandotte County Lake Park

Climate

Kansas City lies in the Midwestern United States, as well as near the geographic center of the country, at the confluence of the longest river in the country, the Missouri River, and the Kansas River (also known as the Kaw River). The city lies in the Humid continental climate (Köppen Dfa) zone, with four distinct seasons, and moderate precipitation, and is part of USDA plant hardiness zones 5b and 6a Being located in the center of North America, far removed from a significant body of water, there is significant potential for extremes of hot and cold swings in temperature throughout the year. Unless otherwise stated, normal figures below are based on data from 1981 to 2010 at Downtown Airport. The warmest month of the year is July, with a 24-hour average temperature of 81.0 °F (27.2 °C). The summer months are hot, but can get very hot and moderately humid, with moist air riding up from the Gulf of Mexico. High temperatures surpass 100 °F (38 °C) on 5.6 days of the year, Precipitation, both in frequency and total accumulation, shows a marked uptick in late spring and summer.

Kansas City is situated on the edge of the "Tornado Alley", a broad region where cold air from the Rocky Mountains in Canada collides with warm air from the Gulf of Mexico, leading to the formation of powerful storms especially during the spring. A few areas of the Kansas City Metropolitan Area have had some severe outbreaks of tornadoes at different points in the past, including the Ruskin Heights tornado in 1957, and the May 2003 tornado outbreak sequence. The region can also fall victim to the sporadic ice storm during the winter months, such as the 2002 ice storm during which hundreds of thousands lost power for days and (in some cases) weeks. Kansas City and its outlying areas are also subject to flooding, including the Great Flood of 1993 and the Great Flood of 1951.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1880 3,200
1890 38,316 1097.4%
1900 51,418 34.2%
1910 82,331 60.1%
1920 101,177 22.9%
1930 121,857 20.4%
1940 121,458 −0.3%
1950 129,553 6.7%
1960 121,901 −5.9%
1970 168,213 38.0%
1980 161,087 −4.2%
1990 149,767 −7.0%
2000 146,866 −1.9%
2010 145,786 −0.7%
Est. 2015 151,306 3.0%
U.S. Decennial Census
2013 Estimate
Demographic profile 2010 1990 1970 1950
White 52.2% 65.0% 78.9% 79.4%
 —Non-Hispanic 40.2% 61.9% 76.3% N/A
Black or African American 26.8% 15.8% 10.7% 9.9%
Hispanic or Latino (of any race) 27.8% 7.1% 3.2% N/A
Asian 2.7% 1.2% 0.1%

According to the 2010 census, there were 145,786 people, 53,925 households, and 35,112 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,168.1 inhabitants per square mile (451.0/km2). There were 61,969 housing units at an average density of 496.5 per square mile (191.7/km2). The median age in the city was 32.5 years. 28.4% of residents were under the age of 18; 9.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 27.7% were from 25 to 44; 23.7% were from 45 to 64; and 10.5% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.4% male and 50.6% female.

There were 53,925 households of which 37.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 39.1% were married couples living together, 18.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 7.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.9% were non-families. 28.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.68 and the average family size was 3.32.

The racial composition of Kansas City, Kansas, as of 2010, was as follows:

  • White: 52.2%
  • Black or African American: 26.8%
  • Native American: 0.8%
  • Asian: 2.7%
  • Pacific Islander: 0.1%
  • Other races: 13.6%
  • Two or more races: 3.8%
  • Hispanic or Latino (of any race): 27.8%
  • Non-Hispanic Whites: 40.2%

As of the 2000 census, the median household income in the city was $33,011, and the median income for a family was $39,491. Males had a median income of $30,992 versus $24,543 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,737. About 13.0% of families and 17.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.8% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

River transportation was important to early Kansas City, Kansas, as its location at the confluence of the Missouri and Kansas Rivers afforded easy access to trade. A portion of I-70 was the first project in the United States completed under the provisions of the new Federal-Aid Highway Act of 1956 (though not the first constructed or to begin construction).

I70Kansas
Interstate 70 as it enters Kansas, crossing the Kansas River.

Major highways

  • Interstate 35 – To Des Moines, Iowa, to the north and Wichita, Kansas, to the south.
  • Interstate 70 – To St. Louis, Missouri, to the east and Topeka, Kansas/Denver, Colorado, to the west.

Spur routes and notable roads

  • Interstate 435 – A bi-state loop through the Missouri and Kansas suburbs.
  • Interstate 635 – Connects the Kansas suburbs with Kansas City, Kansas, and Kansas City International Airport.
  • Interstate 670 – A southern bypass of I-70 and Southern portion of the downtown loop. Signed as East I-70 when exiting from I-35 while traveling north.
  • US-24-40 – Combination of the US-24 and US-40 highways that pass through Kansas City.
  • K-5 – A minor freeway bypassing the north of Kansas City, Kansas, connecting the GM Fairfax plant with I-635. K-5 continues as Leavenworth Road west to I-435 then on to Leavenworth, Kansas.
  • K-7 – A freeway linking Leavenworth County, Kansas, Wyandotte County, Kansas and Johnson County, Kansas.
  • K-32 – A highway that links Leavenworth County, Kansas, Wyandotte County, and Douglas County, Kansas.

Roads

  • US-169, 7th Street Trafficway
  • South 18th Street Expressway
  • State Avenue and Parallel Parkway
  • Kansas Avenue and the Turner Diagonal

Culture

Kansas City, Kansas, has a number of buildings that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The city is home to the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Kansas City in Kansas, which covers 12,500 square miles (32,000 km2) in eastern Kansas.

Memorial Hall is a 3,500-seat indoor arena/auditorium located in the city's downtown. The venue, which has a permanent stage, is used for public assemblies, concerts and sporting events. In 1887, John G. Braecklein constructed a Victorian home for John and Margaret Scroggs in the area of Strawberry Hill. It is a fine example of the Queen Anne Style architecture erected in Kansas City, Kansas.

RosedaleArchKCK
Rosedale arch, a replica of the Arc de Triomphe, at the top of memorial drive ().

The Rosedale Arch, dedicated to the men of Kansas City, Kansas, who served in World War I, is a small-scale replica of France's famous Arc de Triomphe. It is located on Mount Marty in Rosedale, overlooking the intersection of Rainbow and Southwest boulevards.

Wyandotte High School is a notable public school building located at 2501 Minnesota Avenue. Built in 1936 as a Works Progress Administration project, the school was later designated as a Historical Landmark by the city in 1985 and placed on the National Register of Historic Places on April 30, 1986. In 1889, the Wyandotte County Museum and Historical Society was established as a permanent repository of the county's history. The Argentine Carnegie Library, the only Carnegie library that exists in the metropolitan area, was built in 1917.

Other notable points of interest in the Kansas City, Kansas, area include Fire Station No. 9, Granada Theater, Hanover Heights Neighborhood Historic District, Huron Cemetery, Judge Louis Gates House, Kansas City, Kansas Hall, Kansas City, Kansas Fire Headquarters, Great Wolf Lodge, Schlitterbahn Vacation Village, Quindaro Townsite, Sauer Castle, Scottish Rite Temple, Shawnee Street Overpass, Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Building, St. Augustine Hall, Theodore Shafer House, Trowbridge Archeological Site, Westheight Manor and Westheight Manor District, White Church Christian Church, Wyandotte County Courthouse and the Muncie area.

Media

Kansas City, Kansas, is part of a bi-state media market that comprises 32 counties in northeastern Kansas and northwestern Missouri. The Kansas City media market (ranked 32nd by Arbitron and 31st by Nielsen) includes 10 television stations, and 30 FM and 21 AM radio stations. Due to its close proximity to the Topeka media market, most of the television and radio stations from that city are receivable over-the-air in portions of the Kansas City, Kansas, area.

Newspapers

Kansas City, Kansas is served by the The Kansan, a daily newspaper which ceased its print publication and became an online-only paper in 2009. Newspapers serving the city's suburbs include The Record (serving Turner, Argentine and Rosedale), Piper Press (serving Piper) and The Wyandotte West (weekly publication for western Wyandotte County).

Weekly newspapers include alternative publication The Pitch, faith-oriented newspaper The Kansas City Metro Voice, The Wyandotte Echo (which focuses on legal news), The Call (which is focused on the African-American community), business newspaper Kansas City Business Journal and the bilingual publication Dos Mundos.

Broadcast media

The major U.S. broadcast television networks have affiliates in the Kansas City market; including WDAF-TV 4 (Fox), KCTV 5 (CBS), KMBC-TV 9 (ABC), KCPT 19 (PBS), KCWE 29 (The CW), KSHB-TV 41 (NBC) and KSMO-TV 62 (MyNetworkTV). Other television stations in the market include Saint Joseph, Missouri-based KTAJ-TV 16 (TBN), KCKS-LD 25, Lawrence, Kansas-based KMCI-TV 38 (independent), Spanish-language station KUKC-LP 48 (Univision), and KPXE-TV 50 (Ion Television).

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