Pilesgrove Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Pilesgrove Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Pilesgrove
Municipal Building
Municipal Building
Pilesgrove Township highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Pilesgrove Township highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Pilesgrove Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Pilesgrove Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Salem
Earliest mention April 15, 1701
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Area
 • Total 35.073 sq mi (90.840 km2)
 • Land 34.843 sq mi (90.243 km2)
 • Water 0.230 sq mi (0.596 km2)  0.66%
Area rank 69th of 566 in state
5th of 15 in county
Elevation 62 ft (19 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 4,016
 • Estimate (2015) 4,063
 • Rank 412th of 566 in state
6th of 15 in county
 • Density 115.3/sq mi (44.5/km2)
 • Density rank 534th of 566 in state
8th of 15 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08098
Area code(s) 856 exchange: 769
FIPS code 3403358530
GNIS feature ID 0882132
Website www.pilesgrovenj.org

Pilesgrove Township is a township in Salem County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 4,016, reflecting an increase of 93 (+2.4%) from the 3,923 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 673 (+20.7%) from the 3,250 counted in the 1990 Census.

Pile's Grove was first mentioned in a deed dated April 15, 1701, through the date of the township's original corporation is unknown. Pilesgrove was incorporated as one of New Jersey's original group of 104 townships that were established on February 21, 1798. Portions of the township were taken on December 6, 1769, to form Pittsgrove Township and on July 26, 1882, to create Woodstown. The township was named for Thomas Pyle.

In 1979, Pilesgrove Township enacted the state's first right-to-farm law, protecting farming as a "natural right hereby ordained to exist as a permitted use everywhere in the Township of Pilesgrove."

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 35.073 square miles (90.840 km2), including 34.843 square miles (90.243 km2) of land and 0.230 square miles (0.596 km2) of water (0.66%). The Salem River flows through the township.

The township borders the Salem County municipalities of Alloway Township, Carneys Point Township, Mannington Township, Oldmans Township and Upper Pittsgrove Township. Pilesgrove Township also borders Gloucester County. The Borough of Woodstown is an independent municipality completely surrounded by Pilesgrove Township, making it part of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another. Woodstown serves as the more densely settled commercial core of the paired communities, while Pilesgrove is more agricultural.

Unincorporated communities in the township include Avis Mills, Courees Landing, East Lake, Eldridges Hill, Fenwick, Friendship, Milltown, Paulding, Point Airy, Richmanville, Sharptown, Union Grove and Yorktown.

The Pilesgrove Solar Farm is one of the largest in the state, covering 100 acres (40 ha) with 71,000 solar panels that generate 20 megawatts of electricity, enough to provide power for more than 5,000 homes.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,756
1820 2,012 14.6%
1830 2,150 6.9%
1840 2,477 15.2%
1850 2,962 19.6%
1860 3,359 13.4%
1870 3,385 0.8%
1880 3,007 −11.2%
1890 1,796 * −40.3%
1900 1,744 −2.9%
1910 1,606 −7.9%
1920 1,770 10.2%
1930 1,815 2.5%
1940 1,614 −11.1%
1950 1,942 20.3%
1960 2,519 29.7%
1970 2,706 7.4%
1980 2,810 3.8%
1990 3,250 15.7%
2000 3,923 20.7%
2010 4,016 2.4%
Est. 2015 4,063 1.2%
Population sources: 1810-2000
1810-1920 1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,016 people, 1,488 households, and 1,091 families residing in the township. The population density was 115.3 per square mile (44.5/km2). There were 1,594 housing units at an average density of 45.7 per square mile (17.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 90.81% (3,647) White, 5.93% (238) Black or African American, 0.12% (5) Native American, 0.92% (37) Asian, 0.12% (5) Pacific Islander, 0.72% (29) from other races, and 1.37% (55) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.59% (104) of the population.

There were 1,488 households out of which 27.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 63.9% were married couples living together, 6.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.7% were non-families. 21.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 14.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.62 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the township, the population was spread out with 20.4% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 18.8% from 25 to 44, 32.4% from 45 to 64, and 21.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 47.3 years. For every 100 females there were 93.7 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 93.5 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $87,083 (with a margin of error of +/- $12,552) and the median family income was $102,870 (+/- $13,121). Males had a median income of $63,352 (+/- $12,197) versus $59,700 (+/- $6,558) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $34,966 (+/- $3,754). About 0.8% of families and 4.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.5% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 3,923 people, 1,216 households, and 994 families residing in the township. The population density was 112.4 people per square mile (43.4/km²). There were 1,261 housing units at an average density of 36.1 per square mile (13.9/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 84.63% White, 12.18% African American, 0.28% Native American, 0.92% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 1.07% from other races, and 0.87% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.98% of the population.

There were 1,216 households out of which 35.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.1% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 18.2% were non-families. 14.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.91 and the average family size was 3.24.

In the township the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 27.2% from 25 to 44, 26.2% from 45 to 64, and 14.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 107.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 107.9 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $66,042, and the median income for a family was $71,629. Males had a median income of $50,833 versus $31,806 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,400. About 2.3% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and 2.8% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 85.39 miles (137.42 km) of roadways, of which 43.86 miles (70.59 km) were maintained by the municipality, 29.94 miles (48.18 km) by Salem County, 10.79 miles (17.36 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 0.80 miles (1.29 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

U.S. Route 40 traverses the township roughly east to west and Route 45 roughly south to north, with the two roadways meeting in Woodstown, the donut at the center. The New Jersey Turnpike nicks the northwest corner of Pilesgrove Township and County Route 581 cuts through the southeast corner.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service between Salem and Philadelphia on the 401 route.

The 18.6-mile (29.9 km) southern portion of the freight rail Salem Branch, operated under contract by Southern Railroad of New Jersey, runs through the township.


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