Upper Pittsgrove Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Upper Pittsgrove Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Upper Pittsgrove
Pittsgrove Presbyterian Church
Pittsgrove Presbyterian Church
Upper Pittsgrove Township highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Upper Pittsgrove Township highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Upper Pittsgrove Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Upper Pittsgrove Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Salem
Incorporated March 10, 1846
Area
 • Total 40.486 sq mi (104.857 km2)
 • Land 40.328 sq mi (104.449 km2)
 • Water 0.158 sq mi (0.408 km2)  0.39%
Area rank 54th of 566 in state
3rd of 15 in county
Elevation 131 ft (40 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 3,505
 • Estimate (2015) 3,423
 • Rank 431st of 566 in state
7th of 15 in county
 • Density 86.9/sq mi (33.6/km2)
 • Density rank 548th of 566 in state
12th of 15 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08318 - Elmer
Area code(s) 856
FIPS code 3403375110
GNIS feature ID 1723212
Website www.upperpittsgrovenj.org

Upper Pittsgrove Township is a township in Salem County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,505, reflecting an increase of 37 (+1.1%) from the 3,468 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 328 (+10.4%) from the 3,140 counted in the 1990 Census.

Upper Pittsgrove Township was incorporated on March 10, 1846, from portions of Pittsgrove Township. Portions of the township were taken on January 28, 1893, to form Elmer.

The township was named for Pittsgrove Township, which in turn was named for William Pitt, 1st Earl of Chatham, a supporter of the colonial cause.

It is a dry town, where alcohol cannot be sold, as affirmed by a referendum passed in 1979, though alcohol is available at a winery in the township.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 40.486 square miles (104.857 km2), including 40.328 square miles (104.449 km2) of land and 0.158 square miles (0.408 km2) of water (0.39%). Upper Pittsgrove leads New Jersey in acres of active agriculture and preserved farmland. The Salem River has its source in the township.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Ballingers Mill, Daretown, Foxs Mill, Friendship Church, Monroeville, New Freedom, Newkirk, Pittsgrove, Pole Tavern, Shirley, Whig Lane and Woods Mills.

The township borders Alloway Township, Elmer, Pilesgrove Township and Pittsgrove Township. Upper Pittsgrove Township also borders Cumberland County and Gloucester County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1850 1,656
1860 2,082 25.7%
1870 2,087 0.2%
1880 2,073 −0.7%
1890 1,923 −7.2%
1900 1,725 * −10.3%
1910 1,754 1.7%
1920 1,724 −1.7%
1930 1,899 10.2%
1940 1,925 1.4%
1950 2,204 14.5%
1960 2,715 23.2%
1970 2,884 6.2%
1980 3,139 8.8%
1990 3,140 0.0%
2000 3,468 10.4%
2010 3,505 1.1%
Est. 2015 3,423 −2.3%
Population sources: 1850-2000
1850-1920 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 3,505 people, 1,247 households, and 931.5 families residing in the township. The population density was 86.9 per square mile (33.6/km2). There were 1,310 housing units at an average density of 32.5 per square mile (12.5/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 94.89% (3,326) White, 2.17% (76) Black or African American, 0.43% (15) Native American, 0.23% (8) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.91% (32) from other races, and 1.37% (48) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.02% (106) of the population.

There were 1,247 households out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.6% were married couples living together, 6.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.3% were non-families. 20.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the township, the population was spread out with 22.4% under the age of 18, 7.7% from 18 to 24, 21.8% from 25 to 44, 32.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.7 years. For every 100 females there were 102.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 100.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $80,957 (with a margin of error of +/- $12,476) and the median family income was $83,438 (+/- $13,632). Males had a median income of $55,246 (+/- $4,750) versus $36,316 (+/- $13,317) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $30,264 (+/- $3,595). About 2.4% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.2% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 3,468 people, 1,207 households, and 959 families residing in the township. The population density was 85.9 people per square mile (33.2/km²). There were 1,250 housing units at an average density of 31.0 per square mile (11.9/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 94.84% White, 2.16% African American, 0.52% Native American, 0.32% Asian, 1.30% from other races, and 0.87% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.14% of the population.

There were 1,207 households out of which 35.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 67.5% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.5% were non-families. 16.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.80 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the township the population was spread out with 25.3% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 26.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 99.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $53,813, and the median income for a family was $56,768. Males had a median income of $41,319 versus $27,976 for females. The per capita income for the township was $21,732. About 6.0% of families and 8.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.7% of those under age 18 and 5.6% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township has a total of 111.44 miles (179.35 km) of roadways, of which 43.02 miles (69.23 km) were maintained by the municipality, 51.38 miles (82.69 km) by Salem County and 17.04 miles (27.42 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

State Route 77 runs through the center of the township for 7.6 miles (12.2 km) from Upper Deerfield Township in Cumberland County to Elk Township in Gloucester County to the north. U.S. Route 40 (Harding Highway) runs across the township for about 10.0 miles (16.1 km), from Pilesgrove Township in the west, enters Elmer borough, re-enters the township and continues to Franklin Township in Gloucester County to the east. County Route 553 (Buck Road) cuts across the eastern panhandle of the township, from Pittsgrove Township in the south to Franklin Township in the north.

County Route 581 (Commissioners Pike) enters on the western border from Pilesgrove Township and heads north for 3.5 miles (5.6 km) towards South Harrison Township.

Pole Tavern Circle is a traffic circle at the intersection of U.S. Route 40, State Route 77, Monroeville Road (County Route 604), and Daretown Road (County Route 635). The Pole Tavern Circle, named for a liberty pole that stood at the site during the American Revolutionary War, is the location of a large historic cannon that was first placed there in 1913.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides service between Bridgeton and Philadelphia on the 410 route.


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