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Upper Deerfield Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Upper Deerfield
Deerfield Presbyterian Church
Upper Deerfield Township highlighted in Cumberland County. Inset map: Cumberland County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Upper Deerfield Township highlighted in Cumberland County. Inset map: Cumberland County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Upper Deerfield Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Upper Deerfield Township, New Jersey
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Coordinates: 39°29′42″N 75°13′01″W / 39.494923°N 75.216943°W / 39.494923; -75.216943Coordinates: 39°29′42″N 75°13′01″W / 39.494923°N 75.216943°W / 39.494923; -75.216943
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Cumberland
Incorporated April 3, 1922
Government
 • Type Township
 • Body Township Committee
Area
 • Total 31.39 sq mi (81.31 km2)
 • Land 31.24 sq mi (80.92 km2)
 • Water 0.15 sq mi (0.39 km2)  0.48%
Area rank 82nd of 565 in state
8th of 14 in county
Elevation
92 ft (28 m)
Population
 • Total 7,660
 • Estimate 
(2019)
7,277
 • Rank 299th of 566 in state
5th of 14 in county
 • Density 246.3/sq mi (95.1/km2)
 • Density rank 492nd of 566 in state
5th of 14 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08302 - Seabrook
Area code(s) 856
FIPS code 3401174870
GNIS feature ID 0882055

Upper Deerfield Township is a township in Cumberland County, New Jersey, United States. It is part of the Vineland-Millville-Bridgeton Primary Metropolitan Statistical Area for statistical purposes. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 7,660, reflecting an increase of 104 (+1.4%) from the 7,556 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 629 (+9.1%) from the 6,927 counted in the 1990 Census.

Upper Deerfield Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 23, 1922, from portions of Deerfield Township, based on the results of a referendum held on April 3, 1922. The township was named for Deerfield Township, which in turn was named for Deerfield, Massachusetts.

It is a dry town, where alcohol cannot be sold, as affirmed by a referendum passed in 1972. Upper Deerfield does not have its own police force and is protected by the New Jersey State Police.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 31.275 square miles (81.002 km2), including 31.098 square miles (80.543 km2) of land and 0.177 square miles (0.458 km2) of water (0.57%).

Seabrook Farms (2010 population of 1,484) is a unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Upper Deerfield Township.

The township borders Hopewell Township, Bridgeton, Fairfield Township, Deerfield Township, and Salem County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 2,051
1940 2,020 −1.5%
1950 5,203 157.6%
1960 6,040 16.1%
1970 6,648 10.1%
1980 6,810 2.4%
1990 6,927 1.7%
2000 7,556 9.1%
2010 7,660 1.4%
2019 (est.) 7,277 −5.0%
Population sources:1930-2010
1930 1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 7,660 people, 2,866 households, and 2,104 families residing in the township. The population density was 246.3 per square mile (95.1/km2). There were 3,025 housing units at an average density of 97.3 per square mile (37.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 74.67% (5,720) White, 12.96% (993) Black or African American, 1.27% (97) Native American, 2.65% (203) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 5.38% (412) from other races, and 3.07% (235) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 9.43% (722) of the population.

There were 2,866 households out of which 28.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.9% were married couples living together, 15.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.6% were non-families. 22.1% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.65 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the township, the population was spread out with 23.5% under the age of 18, 8.2% from 18 to 24, 23.2% from 25 to 44, 28.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.2 years. For every 100 females there were 93.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.6 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $53,646 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,771) and the median family income was $61,974 (+/- $9,964). Males had a median income of $45,532 (+/- $5,633) versus $36,741 (+/- $10,855) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $26,033 (+/- $2,581). About 8.9% of families and 12.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.0% of those under age 18 and 4.8% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 7,556 people, 2,757 households, and 2,125 families residing in the township. The population density was 242.9 people per square mile (93.8/km2). There were 2,881 housing units at an average density of 92.6 per square mile (35.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 75.77% White, 16.41% African American, 0.81% Native American, 3.06% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.83% from other races, and 2.12% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.54% of the population.

There were 2,757 households, out of which 35.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 57.1% were married couples living together, 15.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.9% were non-families. 20.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.12.

In the township the population was spread out, with 27.8% under the age of 18, 7.4% from 18 to 24, 25.5% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 14.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.5 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $47,861, and the median income for a family was $51,472. Males had a median income of $37,064 versus $23,719 for females. The per capita income for the township was $18,884. About 10.1% of families and 13.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.2% of those under age 18 and 10.8% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

Sunset Lake is a reservoir located primarily in Hopewell Township and Upper Deerfield Township that was created by damming a stream that feeds to the area from Seeley Lake.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 103.73 miles (166.94 km) of roadways, of which 29.56 miles (47.57 km) were maintained by the municipality, 64.38 miles (103.61 km) by Cumberland County and 9.79 miles (15.76 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 77 enters from Bridgeton on the township's southern border and heads north through the center of the township for 7.6 miles (12.2 km) to Upper Pittsgrove Township at the northern tip of Upper Deerfield Township. Route 56 (Landis Avenue) branches off from Route 77 near the township's border with Bridgeton and heads northeast for 4.8 miles (7.7 km) towards Pittsgrove Township.

County Route 540 (Deerfield Road) traverses the northern quarter of the township for 4.6 miles (7.4 km) from Hopewell Township in the west towards Pittsgrove Township on the east. County Route 553 (South Woodruff Road / East Finley Road / Centerton Road) runs along the eastern side of the township for 6.6 miles (10.6 km) from Fairfield Township in the south towards Pittsgrove Township in the northeast corner. County Route 552 (Irving Avenue) follows the southern border of the township for 2.3 miles (3.7 km) from Bridgeton in the west towards Fairfield Township in the southeast corner of the township.

Public transportation

NJ Transit offers service on the 410 route between Bridgeton and Philadelphia, and the 553 route between Upper Deerfield Township and Atlantic City.

Points of interest

  • Upper Deerfield Township Schools's 2014–15 School Report Card from the New Jersey Department of Education

Education

The Upper Deerfield Township Schools serve public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprised of three schools, had an enrollment of 884 students and 79.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 11.1:1. Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Charles F. Seabrook School with 384 students in grades PreK-3), Elizabeth E. Moore School with 186 students in grades 4-5 and Woodruff School with 307 students in grades 6–8.

Public school students in ninth through twelfth grades attend Cumberland Regional High School, which also serves students from Deerfield Township, Fairfield Township, Greenwich Township, Hopewell Township, Shiloh Borough and Stow Creek Township. As of the 2017–18 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 1,127 students and 78.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 14.4:1. high school district has a nine-member board of education, with board seats allocated to the constituent municipalities based on population, with each municipality assigned a minimum of one seat; Upper Deerfield Township has two seats on the board.

Students are also eligible to attend Cumberland County Technology Education Center in Vineland, serving students from the entire county in its full-time technical training programs, which are offered without charge to students who are county residents.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Upper Deerfield Township include:

  • Charles F. Seabrook (1881–1964), business man and owner of Seabrook Farms, a family-owned frozen vegetable packing plant that at one point was the largest irrigated truck farm in the world, who was the namesake of Seabrook community and the Charles F. Seabrook School.

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