Brielle, New Jersey facts for kids

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Brielle, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Brielle
Motto: "A Community By the River"
Map of Brielle in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Brielle in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Brielle, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Brielle, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated June 3, 1919
Named for Brielle, Netherlands
Area
 • Total 2.375 sq mi (6.151 km2)
 • Land 1.757 sq mi (4.550 km2)
 • Water 0.618 sq mi (1.601 km2)  26.02%
Area rank 382nd of 566 in state
26th of 53 in county
Elevation 7 ft (2 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 4,774
 • Estimate (2015) 4,757
 • Rank 385th of 566 in state
34th of 53 in county
 • Density 2,717.5/sq mi (1,049.2/km2)
 • Density rank 229th of 566 in state
27th of 53 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08730
Area code(s) 732 exchanges: 223, 292, 528
FIPS code 3402507750
GNIS feature ID 0885170
Website www.briellenj.com

Brielle is a borough located in southern Monmouth County, New Jersey along the Manasquan River. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,774, reflecting a decline of 119 (-2.4%) from the 4,893 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 487 (+11.1%) from the 4,406 counted in the 1990 Census.

Brielle was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 10, 1919, from portions of Wall Township, based on the results of a referendum passed on June 3, 1919. The borough was named for Brielle, a town in the Netherlands.

History

Archaeological excavations along what is now Birch Drive reveal temporary Lenape Native American settlements. The Lenape practiced farming in other parts of Monmouth County much of the year, and they visited the wooded areas in what is now Brielle for hunting and fishing.

The area was originally part of Shrewsbury Township and the first settlers were primarily farmers, and the area became known as Union Landing. In colonial times, salt was an important preservative, and before the American Revolutionary War, most of it was imported from Great Britain. The Union Salt Works opened around the outbreak of the war, and on April 5, 1778, several British Loyalists attacked and burned the salt works and other buildings. A year later, the salt works reopened and continued to operate through the duration of the war.

Early in the 19th century, Shrewsbury Township was divided, and the area became part of Howell Township which was further divided in 1851, when the area became part of Wall Township. On July 7, 1881, a group of businessmen purchased several acres of land and formed the Brielle Land Association with the intention of building vacation homes. The quaint riverside charm of the area reminded one of the developers of another pastoral town on a river which he had visited, Brielle, in the Netherlands.

Author Robert Louis Stevenson vacationed in Brielle for most of May 1888. During his stay he wrote a portion of his book The Master of Ballantrae and gave Osborn Island the nickname "Treasure Island" which was the title of one of his previous books.

Geography

7.17.08BrielleByLuigiNovi2
Brielle welcome sign at the border with Manasquan on Union Avenue.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.375 square miles (6.151 km2), including 1.757 square miles (4.550 km2) of land and 0.618 square miles (1.601 km2) of water (26.02%).

Located at the southeastern corner of Monmouth County, Brielle is bordered to the north and east by the Manasquan, to the west by Brick Township (in Ocean County) and Wall Township and to the south by Point Pleasant and Point Pleasant Beach across the Manasquan River. Route 35 runs through the middle of the town and Route 70 runs along its western edge.

The borough is primarily a residential community of single homes, with a few condominiums; there are almost no undeveloped lots of land left. There are several businesses located along Union Avenue and Higgins Avenue and some marinas along the Manasquan River. Ripley's Believe It or Not! once stated that Brielle has "16 bars and no churches". It currently has one church, The Church in Brielle (formerly the Dutch Reformed Church) and several restaurants that have liquor licenses, but no true bars. There is also a 140 acres (0.57 km2) 18 hole golf course called the Manasquan River Golf Club.

The town has approximately 6.4 kilometers (4.0 mi) of waterfront along the Manasquan River, Glimmerglass, and Debbie's Creek, all of which are salt water and tidal. Brielle's borders extend to an 8-acre (32,000 m2) island in the Manasquan River.

Manasquan Park is an unincorporated community located within Brielle.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1920 392
1930 684 74.5%
1940 961 40.5%
1950 1,328 38.2%
1960 2,619 97.2%
1970 3,594 37.2%
1980 4,068 13.2%
1990 4,406 8.3%
2000 4,893 11.1%
2010 4,774 −2.4%
Est. 2015 4,757 −0.4%
Population sources: 1920
1920-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,774 people, 1,805 households, and 1,336 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,717.5 per square mile (1,049.2/km2). There were 2,034 housing units at an average density of 1,157.8 per square mile (447.0/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 94.64% (4,518) White, 2.53% (121) Black or African American, 0.10% (5) Native American, 0.94% (45) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.46% (22) from other races, and 1.32% (63) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.18% (152) of the population.

There were 1,805 households out of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.4% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.0% were non-families. 22.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.13.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 18.7% from 25 to 44, 32.8% from 45 to 64, and 16.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.9 years. For every 100 females there were 97.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 91.3 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $98,419 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,635) and the median family income was $108,818 (+/- $11,831). Males had a median income of $84,568 (+/- $8,259) versus $53,041 (+/- $4,411) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $45,445 (+/- $5,694). About 0.0% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 2.9% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 4,893 people, 1,938 households, and 1,414 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,754.4 people per square mile (1,061.3/km2). There were 2,123 housing units at an average density of 1,195.1 per square mile (460.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.05% White, 3.52% African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.67% Asian, 1.61% from other races, and 1.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.31% of the population.

There were 1,938 households out of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.0% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.7% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 29.0% from 45 to 64, and 17.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $178,368, and the median income for a family was $172,867. Males had a median income of $98,828 versus $72,156 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $105,785. About 2.6% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 27.08 miles (43.58 km) of roadways, of which 21.94 miles (35.31 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.66 miles (4.28 km) by Monmouth County and 2.48 miles (3.99 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus transportation between the borough and Philadelphia on the 317 route and local service on the 830 route.

NJ Transit's North Jersey Coast Line travels through Brielle, but does not stop in the borough. The nearest station is the Manasquan station.

Images for kids


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