Manasquan, New Jersey facts for kids

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Manasquan, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Manasquan
Map of Manasquan in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Manasquan in Monmouth County. Inset: Location of Monmouth County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Manasquan, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Manasquan, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Monmouth
Incorporated December 30, 1887
Area
 • Total 2.530 sq mi (6.553 km2)
 • Land 1.383 sq mi (3.583 km2)
 • Water 1.147 sq mi (2.970 km2)  45.33%
Area rank 373rd of 566 in state
24th of 53 in county
Elevation 3 ft (0.9 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 5,897
 • Estimate (2015) 5,815
 • Rank 350th of 566 in state
29th of 53 in county
 • Density 4,263.0/sq mi (1,646.0/km2)
 • Density rank 140th of 566 in state
14th of 53 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08736
Area code(s) 732
FIPS code 3402543050
GNIS feature ID 0885289
Website www.manasquan-nj.com

Manasquan is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 5,897, reflecting a decline of 413 (-6.5%) from the 6,310 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 941 (+17.5%) from the 5,369 counted in the 1990 Census.

The borough's name is of Lenape origin, variously described as deriving from "Man-A-Squaw-Han" meaning "stream of the island of squaws", "an island with enclosure for squans", "island door" or "point" / "top". Manasquan, Maniquan, Mannisquan, Manasquam, Squan, and Squan Village are variations on the original pronunciation and spelling.

Manasquan was formed as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on December 30, 1887, from portions of Wall Township, based on the results of a referendum held the previous day.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Manasquan as its 22nd best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.530 square miles (6.553 km2), including 1.383 square miles (3.583 km2) of land and 1.147 square miles (2.970 km2) of water (45.33%).

The borough borders the municipalities of Brielle, Sea Girt and Wall Township in Monmouth County; and Point Pleasant Beach in Ocean County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 1,506
1900 1,500 −0.4%
1910 1,582 5.5%
1920 1,705 7.8%
1930 2,320 36.1%
1940 2,340 0.9%
1950 3,178 35.8%
1960 4,022 26.6%
1970 4,971 23.6%
1980 5,354 7.7%
1990 5,369 0.3%
2000 6,310 17.5%
2010 5,897 −6.5%
Est. 2015 5,815 −1.4%
Population sources: 1890-1920
1890 1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 5,897 people, 2,374 households, and 1,550 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,263.0 per square mile (1,646.0/km2). There were 3,500 housing units at an average density of 2,530.2 per square mile (976.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 96.07% (5,665) White, 0.31% (18) Black or African American, 0.02% (1) Native American, 0.61% (36) Asian, 0.02% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.93% (114) from other races, and 1.05% (62) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.02% (414) of the population.

There were 2,374 households out of which 27.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.5% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.7% were non-families. 28.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 23.3% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 22.6% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, and 16.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.5 years. For every 100 females there were 95.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 91.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $87,525 (with a margin of error of +/- $21,227) and the median family income was $107,130 (+/- $13,653). Males had a median income of $98,408 (+/- $6,173) versus $56,250 (+/- $8,110) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $51,068 (+/- $8,350). About 3.1% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.2% of those under age 18 and 4.7% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 6,310 people, 2,600 households, and 1,635 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,579.6 people per square mile (1,765.4/km2). There were 3,531 housing units at an average density of 2,562.7 per square mile (987.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.89% White, 0.41% Black, 0.11% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 0.48% from other races, and 0.67% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.48% of the population.

There were 2,600 households out of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.3% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.1% were non-families. 30.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 96.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.4 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $63,079, and the median income for a family was $73,670. Males had a median income of $52,368 versus $33,333 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,898. About 2.2% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.

Community

Boardwalk7.13.08-9.24.06ByLuigiNovi1
The Manasquan Boardwalk is largely quiet after Labor Day, as seen in this comparative shot facing north, taken in mid-July (left) and late September (right).

Due to its location bordering the Atlantic Ocean, the population of Manasquan increases dramatically in the summer months as tourists flock to the beach.

The Manasquan Inlet provides surfers with waves that are corralled, refracted and enlarged by the jetty protruding out into the Atlantic Ocean. The Manasquan Inlet, reopened in 1931, is the northern terminus of the inland portion of the Intracoastal Waterway.

Manasquan has a downtown area with many small businesses. Algonquin Arts Theatre has shows and movies that play throughout the year. It is a historic 540-seat theatre, built in 1938 as a movie house but converted to a professional live performance space in May 1994.

The demolition of traditional beach bungalows and their replacement with much larger single-family dwellings has helped turn Manasquan into a year-round community. The decrease in tourism and rise in residency can be attributed to the decline of once popular tourist destinations. Manasquan no longer has a 24-hour diner or a miniature golf course, and has lost many of the bars once located in its borders. During the summer months, the local bar and party scene overwhelm the area between Brielle Road and Main Street from the bridges to the ocean, especially with local bars - Leggetts and The Osprey - contributing greatly to the amount of party goers in the town.

The Firemans' Fair occurs every July/August. The fair is the largest source of funds for Manasquan Volunteer Engine Company #2 and dates back to 1974.Though it was on a decade-long hiatus until the late 1990s, the five day-long festivities in 2011 were expected to draw 30,000 attendees.

Manasquan was home to the Cat Fanciers' Association (CFA), the largest registry of pedigreed cats in the world, until 2010.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 27.22 miles (43.81 km) of roadways, of which 24.56 miles (39.53 km) were maintained by the municipality, 1.56 miles (2.51 km) by Monmouth County and 1.10 miles (1.77 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

The Garden State Parkway is the nearest major highway. Route 71 runs through the borough.

Public transportation

NJ Transit offers rail service at the Manasquan station on the North Jersey Coast Line. Passengers can travel south to Point Pleasant Beach and Bay Head or north to points such as Belmar, Long Branch, Newark, Hoboken Terminal and Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan.

NJ Transit provides bus transportation between Manasquan and Philadelphia on the 317 route and local service on the 830 route.

Images for kids


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