Cranbury, New Jersey facts for kids

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Cranbury, New Jersey
Township
Township of Cranbury
Central business district of Cranbury
Central business district of Cranbury
Map of Cranbury Township in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Cranbury Township in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Cranbury Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Cranbury Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Middlesex
Incorporated March 7, 1872
Area
 • Total 13.397 sq mi (34.697 km2)
 • Land 13.247 sq mi (34.309 km2)
 • Water 0.150 sq mi (0.389 km2)  1.12%
Area rank 181st of 566 in state
9th of 25 in county
Elevation 82 ft (25 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 3,857
 • Estimate (2015) 3,958
 • Rank 417th of 566 in state
24th of 25 in county
 • Density 291.2/sq mi (112.4/km2)
 • Density rank 481st of 566 in state
25th of 25 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08512
Area code(s) 609 and 732
FIPS code 3402315550
GNIS feature ID 0882160
Website www.cranburytownship.org

Cranbury is a township in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,857.

History

A deed for a sale of land and improvements dated March 1, 1698, is the earliest evidence of buildings constructed in present-day Cranbury. A home in Cranbury was used by Alexander Hamilton and the Marquis de Lafayette as a headquarters during the American Revolutionary War, and they were visited by General George Washington on June 26, 1778. As part of orders issued during the Presidency of George Washington, maps of Cranbury were made showing the presence of a church, a mill and 25 other buildings. During its earliest years, the location was usually spelled as "Cranberry". Rev. Joseph G. Symmes argued in 1857 that the name was spelled improperly and that the suffix "bury" was more appropriate, leading the name of the community and brook to be changed to "Cranbury" in 1869. The name has been attributed to wild cranberries that grew in the area.

The so-called Hightstown rail accident occurred in or near Cranbury, in 1833. According to John Quincy Adams, who was aboard the train and who wrote in his diary about it, the train was 3 miles (4.8 km) from Hightstown when the disaster struck, putting the accident near what is now Cranbury Station. Among the passengers aboard were Tyrone Power and Cornelius Vanderbilt.

Cranbury was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 7, 1872, from portions of both Monroe Township and South Brunswick Township. Portions of the township were taken on April 1, 1919, to form Plainsboro Township.

George Washington's headquarters were located in Cranbury while planning for the Battle of Monmouth, a major turning point during the Revolutionary War.

Many buildings on Cranbury's Main Street and in the surrounding area date to the 18th or 19th century. The entire downtown area is designated as a Historic District, which was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1980 as District #80002502.

The township celebrated its tricentennial in 1998.

Updike Parsonage Barn was relocated and reconstructed in 2010.

Geography

Brainerd Lake, Cranbury, NJ
Brainerd Lake in the center of the township
Cranbury-twp-nj
Cranbury Township highlighted in Middlesex County

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 13.397 square miles (34.697 km2), including 13.247 square miles (34.309 km2) of land and 0.150 square miles (0.389 km2) of water (1.12%).

Cranbury CDP (2010 Census population of 2,181) is a unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Cranbury Township. Despite the match between the name of the Township and the CDP, the two are not one and the same, as was the case for most paired Township / CDP combinations (i.e., a CDP with the same as its parent township) before the 2010 Census, when most such paired CDPs were coextensive with a township of the same name.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Brain Grove Lake, Cranbury Station, Wescott and Wyckoffs Mills.

The township borders Plainsboro Township, Monroe Township and South Brunswick Township in Middlesex County; and East Windsor Township in Mercer County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,509
1890 1,422 −5.8%
1900 1,428 0.4%
1910 1,424 −0.3%
1920 1,083 * −23.9%
1930 1,278 18.0%
1940 1,342 5.0%
1950 1,797 33.9%
1960 2,001 11.4%
1970 2,253 12.6%
1980 1,927 −14.5%
1990 2,500 29.7%
2000 3,227 29.1%
2010 3,857 19.5%
Est. 2015 3,958 2.6%
Population sources:
1880-1920 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 3,857 people, 1,320 households, and 1,060 families residing in the township. The population density was 291.2 per square mile (112.4/km2). There were 1,371 housing units at an average density of 103.5 per square mile (40.0/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 80.53% (3,106) White, 3.45% (133) Black or African American, 0.10% (4) Native American, 13.74% (530) Asian, 0.03% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.36% (14) from other races, and 1.79% (69) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.57% (99) of the population.

There were 1,320 households out of which 41.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 71.3% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.7% were non-families. 17.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.82 and the average family size was 3.21.

In the township, the population was spread out with 27.2% under the age of 18, 5.4% from 18 to 24, 15.1% from 25 to 44, 35.5% from 45 to 64, and 16.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 46.2 years. For every 100 females there were 94.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 88.2 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $131,667 (with a margin of error of +/- $21,076) and the median family income was $146,250 (+/- $24,045). Males had a median income of $122,566 (+/- $25,917) versus $60,781 (+/- $22,066) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $55,236 (+/- $5,718). About 3.1% of families and 4.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.2% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 3,227 people, 1,091 households, and 877 families residing in the township. The population density was 240.6 people per square mile (92.9/km²). There were 1,121 housing units at an average density of 83.6 per square mile (32.3/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 88.78% White, 2.26% African American, 7.41% Asian, 0.22% from other races, and 1.33% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.70% of the population.

There were 1,091 households out of which 46.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 74.6% were married couples living together, 4.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.6% were non-families. 16.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.92 and the average family size was 3.31.

In the township the population was spread out with 30.4% under the age of 18, 3.4% from 18 to 24, 27.6% from 25 to 44, 27.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $111,680, and the median income for a family was $128,410. Males had a median income of $94,683 versus $44,167 for females. The per capita income for the township was $50,698. About 0.7% of families and 1.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.7% of those under age 18 and 0.9% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 51.25 miles (82.48 km) of roadways, of which 31.08 miles (50.02 km) were maintained by the municipality, 12.85 miles (20.68 km) by Middlesex County and 3.16 miles (5.09 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 4.16 miles (6.69 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

A few county routes traverse through Cranbury: 535, 539, 615, and 614.

Cranbury hosts U.S. Route 130 and a 4-mile (6.4 km) section of Interstate 95 (the New Jersey Turnpike). Cranbury is accessible by the Turnpike in neighboring East Windsor Township (Exit 8) and Monroe Township (Exit 8A). The Molly Pitcher Service Area is located at mile marker 71.7 on the southbound side.

The New Jersey Turnpike Authority widened the Turnpike (with the "dual-dual" setup) between Exit 6 in Mansfield Township and Exit 8A in Monroe Township in late 2014. New entrance and exit ramps were constructed to access the service area.

Public transportation

Middlesex County offers the M6 MCAT shuttle route providing service to Jamesburg and Plainsboro Township.

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