Dover, New Jersey facts for kids

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Dover, New Jersey
Town
Town of Dover
Friends Meetinghouse of Randolph in 1936
Friends Meetinghouse of Randolph in 1936
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Dover, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Dover, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated April 1, 1869
Independent March 5, 1896
Named for Dover, England or Dover, New Hampshire
Area
 • Total 2.730 sq mi (7.070 km2)
 • Land 2.684 sq mi (6.951 km2)
 • Water 0.046 sq mi (0.119 km2)  1.68%
Area rank 362nd of 566 in state
29th of 39 in county
Elevation 558 ft (170 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 18,157
 • Estimate (2015) 18,346
 • Rank 142nd of 566 in state
11th of 39 in county
 • Density 6,765.5/sq mi (2,612.2/km2)
 • Density rank 67th of 566 in state
2nd of 39 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07801-07803, 07806, 07809
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3402718070
GNIS feature ID 0885196
Website www.dover.nj.us

Dover is a town in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. Located on the Rockaway River, Dover is about 31 miles (50 km) west of New York City and about 23 miles (37 km) west of Newark, New Jersey. As of the 2010 United States Census, the town's population was 18,157, reflecting a decline of 31 (-0.2%) from the 18,188 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,073 (+20.3%) from the 15,115 counted in the 1990 Census. Dover has become a majority minority community, with nearly 70% of the population as of the 2010 Census identifying themselves as Hispanic, up from 25% in 1980.

History

Joseph Latham was deeded the land that includes present-day Dover in 1713, from portions of land that had been purchased from Native Americans by the Proprietors of West Jersey. On May 31, 1722, Latham and his wife Jane deeded 527 acres (2.13 km2) over to John Jackson of Flushing, New York. Jackson settled on the eastern portion of his land along Granny's Brook at the site of what would later become the Ross Ribbon Factory on Park Heights Avenue.

Iron ore at the time was so plentiful that it could be collected off the ground at the nearby Dickerson Mine in Mine Hill. At Jackson's Forge, ore would be processed into bars that would then be transported to Paterson and other industrial areas towards the east. The passage of the Iron Act by the British Parliament led to financial difficulties, leading Jackson into bankruptcy in 1753, with all of his property and belongings sold off at a Sheriff's sale. Quaker Hartshorne Fitz Randolph purchased Jackson's property and annexed to his own existing property, which would later become part of Randolph Township.

Dover was incorporated as a town on April 1, 1869, within Randolph Township and became fully independent as of March 5, 1896. The town charter was amended in 1875. On May 7, 1896, Dover was reincorporated as a city and regained its status as a town on March 21, 1899, after the referendum that approved the change was invalidated by a court ruling.

In its past, Dover has had extensive iron and mill works, machine shops, stove, furnace, and range works, boiler and bridge works, rolling mills, drill works, knitting and silk mills, and a large hosiery factory (MacGregors). During this period, Dover was a port on the Morris Canal while it was operational; the boat basin was located at what is today the JFK Commons Park.

Sources attribute the town's name to Dover, England or Dover, New Hampshire.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town had a total area of 2.730 square miles (7.070 km2), including 2.684 square miles (6.951 km2) of land and 0.046 square miles (0.119 km2) of water (1.68%).

Hedden County Park, a 380-acre (1.5 km2) Morris County park, is partly located in Dover, with park entrances in Randolph.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 2,958
1900 5,938
1910 7,468 25.8%
1920 9,803 31.3%
1930 10,031 2.3%
1940 10,491 4.6%
1950 11,174 6.5%
1960 13,034 16.6%
1970 15,039 15.4%
1980 14,681 −2.4%
1990 15,115 3.0%
2000 18,188 20.3%
2010 18,157 −0.2%
Est. 2015 18,346 1.0%
Population sources: 1880-1920
1890-1910 1880-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 18,157 people, 5,562 households, and 3,877 families residing in the town. The population density was 6,765.5 per square mile (2,612.2/km2). There were 5,783 housing units at an average density of 2,154.8 per square mile (832.0/km2)*. The racial makeup of the town was 66.55% (12,083) White, 6.10% (1,108) Black or African American, 0.63% (114) Native American, 2.54% (461) Asian, 0.05% (9) Pacific Islander, 19.88% (3,610) from other races, and 4.25% (772) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 69.38% (12,598) of the population.

There were 5,562 households out of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.6% were married couples living together, 15.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.3% were non-families. 22.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.21 and the average family size was 3.54.

In the town, the population was spread out with 21.6% under the age of 18, 10.5% from 18 to 24, 32.8% from 25 to 44, 24.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.5 years. For every 100 females there were 110.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 111.2 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $59,454 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,227) and the median family income was $61,187 (+/- $2,750). Males had a median income of $34,722 (+/- $4,750) versus $28,098 (+/- $4,993) for females. The per capita income for the town was $21,581 (+/- $990). About 3.6% of families and 10.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 12.8% of those under age 18 and 15.8% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 18,188 people, 5,436 households, and 3,919 families residing in Dover. The population density was 6,788.2 people per square mile (2,620.3/km2). There were 5,568 housing units at an average density of 2,078.1 per square mile (802.2/km2). The racial makeup of the town was 69.45% White, 6.83% African American, 0.34% Native American, 2.47% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 15.99% from other races, and 4.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 57.94% of the population.

11.27% of Dover residents identified themselves as being of Colombian American ancestry in the 2000 Census, the second-highest percentage of the population of any municipality in the United States (behind neighboring Victory Gardens, New Jersey which had 15.27% of residents so identified) with 1,000 residents identifying their ancestry.

There were 5,436 households out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.2% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.9% were non-families. 21.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.29 and the average family size was 3.55.

In the town, the population was spread out with 23.2% under the age of 18, 10.5% from 18 to 24, 36.0% from 25 to 44, 19.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 34 years. For every 100 females there were 106.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 106.7 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $53,423, and the median income for a family was $57,141. Males had a median income of $31,320 versus $27,413 for females. The per capita income for the town was $18,056. About 8.2% of families and 13.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.5% of those under age 18 and 7.1% of those age 65 or over.

Dover has a large Hispanic population with the largest concentrations being of Mexican, Colombian, Dominican and Puerto Rican ancestry. Hispanics have been a demographic majority since 1980, and are growing quickly. As of the 2000 Census, Dover's population was 57.9% Hispanic, making it the municipality with the fifth highest Hispanic population percentage in New Jersey and one of eight New Jersey municipalities with a Hispanic majority. The surrounding Morris County area is predominantly non-Hispanic (9.8% Hispanic or Latino, of any race).

Parks and recreation

  • Hamilton Field is one of Dover's recreation centers, featuring a football field with bleachers, soccer fields, and a historic cinder track that is used by walkers and joggers.
  • JFK Memorial Commons Park consists of a children's play park and the town Gazebo. JFK Park hosts the town's annual Christmas tree lighting, Easter egg hunt, Halloween parade, summer concerts and on occasions ceremonies following town parades. The park was constructed by filling in the basin for the old Morris Canal. The name was given following the assassination of President Kennedy in 1963.
  • Crescent Field includes a new turf soccer field and is the hosting site for Dover's annual Colombian Festival.
  • Water Works Park consists of a baseball field, picnic area, and accessible banks of the Rockaway River. The Water Commission purchased the lane in 1902 and developed wells for much needed water to a growing community. In 1933, the land became a playground for picnicking and swimming in the nearby Rockaway River.
  • Hurd Park is a passive park with no playgrounds or ballfields. Ideal location for wedding and graduation photographs with its Greek style pavilion having fluted columns and a circular gazebo-like center with a red-tiled roof and a scenic background. Donated to the town in 1911 by John Hurd, the park is also host to a 1922 World War I Spirit of the American Doughboy statue, one of a few found around the country. The park also displays a Civil War Memorial, a Spanish American War Memorial and a brick-walk memorial naming those on stone bricks who served in the Armed Forces. The park is also adjacent to Indian Falls, a scenic walk along the Jackson Brook to Hedden Park.
  • Hedden Park on Reservoir Avenue. An active park, mostly in Randolph Township, with a picnic pavilion and tables, stone cooking grills for picnics in the woods, paddle boats in season, playgrounds, ball fields and hiking trails.
  • Triangle Park. In downtown Dover at the foot of Prospect Street, the small park is maintained by Dover's Renaissance Club and the home of Hudson Favell's "Story Poles."
  • Hooey Park is a small neighborhood park with a climbing playground for kids located in the Salem Village section of town.
  • Richards Avenue Park is a small park built on a vacant lot consisting of a small climbing playground for kids.
  • Bowlby Park and King Field located in North Dover was developed for Little League Baseball, soccer and high school girls softball games.
  • Mountain Park is located in South Dover on the old Munson Mine Tract and is being developed for hiking trails.

Community

The community of Dover is centered around a developed downtown area around Blackwell Street, featuring many eateries primarily owned and run by Hispanics of various countries, offering their ethnic food. Other culinary establishments include sushi, pizza, coffee shops, and popular Irish and Italian food.

On every Sunday from April to December, a flea market is conducted downtown.

Dover has been described as a walking town, as most parts of town are within about a 1/2 mile of the downtown area and most streets have sidewalks.

Popular culture

  • The climactic scene of the 2008 movie, The Wrestler, was filmed at the Baker Theater.
  • Dover is where the band Metallica performed their first show with lead guitarist Kirk Hammett.
  • The music video for Eddie Money's "I Wanna Go Back" was filmed on Blackwell Street and at the old Dover High School, Dover Middle School, and now Joe Kubert School of Cartoon and Graphic Art.
  • Dover is referenced multiple times in The Sopranos. In season 2, episode 17 ("Commendatori"), Elvis impersonator/DiMeo crime family associate, Jimmy Bones, tells Big Pussy Bonpensiero and Agent Skip Lipari that he was born and raised in Dover, New Jersey and emphasizes that the town was named after the Cliffs of Dover. In episode 5 of season 5 ("Irregular Around the Margins"), Tony Soprano and Adriana La Cerva get into a car accident in Dover, New Jersey.

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