Randolph, New Jersey facts for kids

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Randolph, New Jersey
Township
Township of Randolph
Official seal of Randolph, New Jersey
Seal
Motto: Where Life is Worth Living
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Randolph, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Randolph, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated January 1, 1806
Area
 • Total 21.071 sq mi (54.574 km2)
 • Land 20.822 sq mi (53.929 km2)
 • Water 0.249 sq mi (0.645 km2)  1.18%
Area rank 134th of 566 in state
8th of 39 in county
Elevation 994 ft (303 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 25,734
 • Estimate (2015) 25,957
 • Rank 97th of 566 in state
3rd of 39 in county
 • Density 1,235.9/sq mi (477.2/km2)
 • Density rank 357th of 566 in state
24th of 39 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07869
07845- Ironia
07970- Mount Freedom
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3402761890
GNIS feature ID 0882201
Website www.randolphnj.org

Randolph is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 25,734, reflecting an increase of 887 (+3.6%) from the 24,847 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,873 (+24.4%) from the 19,974 counted in the 1990 Census.

History

The earliest known inhabitants of what is now Randolph were the Lenni Lenape Native Americans. The earliest European settlers of what is now Randolph were Quakers and one of the pioneering landowners was Hartshorne Fitz-Randolph, who purchased 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) of what would become the township in the Mine Hill area in 1753, later becoming the namesake of the township. New Jersey's first iron mine was established in Randolph in 1713, and for hundreds of years the mines fostered the development of the township, providing the raw materials for weapons used by the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War. During the war, the area was a supply point for George Washington's army during their winter encampment in nearby Jockey Hollow.

Randolph was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on January 1, 1806, from portions of Mendham Township. Portions of the township were taken on April 1, 1869, to create Dover Town within the township, which became an independent municipality as of March 5, 1896. Other portions of the township were taken to create Port Oram (June 26, 1895, now Wharton), Mine Hill Township (March 2, 1923) and Victory Gardens (June 20, 1951).

Randolph became a vacation haven in the early part of the 20th century, known for its woods, ponds, lakes and air. Through the 1950s, farms, large hotels and bungalow colonies dotted the community. Performers such as Phil Silvers, and Frank Sinatra appeared at the hotels. Boxers Max Baer, Floyd Patterson, James J. Braddock and Rocky Marciano trained or fought at the Saltz Hotel.

Landmarks

Randolph's township historical landmarks include the Liberty Tree (which dates back to 1720), the 1869 Bryant Distillery (famed for its applejack) and the 1924 Millbrook School, now rehabilitated and in use as offices.

The Randolph Historical Society has preserved the township's historical heritage in the Museum of Old Randolph. One of Randolph's oldest streets, Gristmill Road, is on the National Register of Historic Places.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 21.071 square miles (54.574 km2), including 20.822 square miles (53.929 km2) of land and 0.249 square miles (0.645 km2) of water (1.18%).

Land in Randolph ranges from 551 feet (168 m) to 1,120 feet (340 m) above sea level. Randolph Township has been designated half rural, half suburban by the New Jersey State Planning Commission.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Black River Pond, Calis, Center Grove, Ironia, Mill Brook, Mount Fern, Mount Freedom, Shongum and Youngstown.

Situated upstream of the Black River, the South Branch of the Raritan River, the Whippany River and the Rockaway River, the hills of Randolph attracted settlers and its streams provided power for industry.

The township borders Mine Hill, Dover, Rockaway Township and Victory Gardens to the north, Mendham Township to the south, Denville Township and Morris Township to the east, Chester Township to the southwest and Roxbury to the west all of which are located in Morris County. It is a suburb of New York City.

Geology

The township is located within the New Jersey Highlands, one of New Jersey's four major physiographic provinces. Part of the Appalachian Mountains, the Highlands are characterized by alternating flat-topped ridges and deep-striking valleys.

Climate

On average, the warmest month is July. The highest recorded temperature was 102 °F in 1953. On average, the coolest month is January, while the maximum average precipitation occurs in September. The lowest recorded temperature was -24 °F in 1943.

Climate data for Randolph, New Jersey
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 36
(2.2)
40
(4.4)
49
(9.4)
60
(15.6)
70
(21.1)
77
(25)
82
(27.8)
80
(26.7)
72
(22.2)
62
(16.7)
52
(11.1)
41
(5)
60.1
(15.6)
Average low °F (°C) 17
(-8.3)
18
(-7.8)
26
(-3.3)
35
(1.7)
45
(7.2)
54
(12.2)
59
(15)
58
(14.4)
50
(10)
38
(3.3)
31
(-0.6)
22
(-5.6)
37.8
(3.19)
Precipitation inches (mm) 4.3
(109.22)
3.2299
(82.04)
4.1799
(106.17)
4.5402
(115.32)
4.9299
(125.22)
4.7799
(121.41)
5.0299
(127.76)
4.7799
(121.41)
5.0902
(129.29)
4.05
(102.87)
4.3201
(109.73)
4.05
(102.87)
53.2799
(1,353.31)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,271
1820 1,252 −1.5%
1830 1,443 15.3%
1840 1,801 24.8%
1850 2,632 46.1%
1860 3,173 20.6%
1870 5,111 61.1%
1880 7,700 50.7%
1890 7,972 3.5%
1900 2,246 * −71.8%
1910 2,307 2.7%
1920 2,509 8.8%
1930 2,165 * −13.7%
1940 2,160 −0.2%
1950 4,293 98.8%
1960 7,295 * 69.9%
1970 13,296 82.3%
1980 17,828 34.1%
1990 19,974 12.0%
2000 24,847 24.4%
2010 25,734 3.6%
Est. 2015 25,957 0.9%
Population sources: 1800-1920
1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 25,734 people, 9,013 households, and 7,075 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,235.9 per square mile (477.2/km2). There were 9,343 housing units at an average density of 448.7 per square mile (173.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 82.44% (21,215) White, 2.68% (690) Black or African American, 0.11% (28) Native American, 10.46% (2,691) Asian, 0.01% (3) Pacific Islander, 2.27% (584) from other races, and 2.03% (523) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.17% (2,616) of the population.

There were 9,013 households out of which 42.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.6% were married couples living together, 7.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.5% were non-families. 17.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.85 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the township, the population was spread out with 28.0% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 24.6% from 25 to 44, 31.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.1 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 95.3 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $123,041 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,800) and the median family income was $144,069 (+/- $7,473). Males had a median income of $100,895 (+/- $2,256) versus $65,011 (+/- $5,834) for females. The per capita income for the township was $56,879 (+/- $3,318). About 1.8% of families and 3.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 2.7% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

Randolphsign
Sign on Patriots Path

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 24,847 people, 8,679 households, and 6,804 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,185.2 people per square mile (457.7/km²). There were 8,903 housing units at an average density of 424.7 per square mile (164.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 85.70% White, 2.30% African American, 0.06% Native American, 9.14% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.31% from other races, and 1.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.86% of the population.

There were 8,679 households out of which 44.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.2% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 21.6% were non-families. 18.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.86 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the township the population was spread out with 29.7% under the age of 18, 5.2% from 18 to 24, 32.2% from 25 to 44, 25.7% from 45 to 64, and 7.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 98.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.8 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $97,589, and the median income for a family was $115,722. Males had a median income of $80,120 versus $45,455 for females. The per capita income for the township was $43,072. About 1.0% of families and 1.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.0% of those under age 18 and 3.4% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

The Brundage Park Recreation Complex covers 232 acres (94 ha). Facilities include six lighted tennis courts, four lighted softball fields, two lighted basketball courts, a tennis practice wall, a Skate Park, a 4 miles (6.4 km) paved walking and jogging trail, Brundage Park Playhouse, a playground, a picnic pavilion, a lacrosse/soccer field, a pond (for fishing or ice skating), a softball field, and a multipurpose area for soccer and other field sports.

Freedom Park covers 172 acres (70 ha). Facilities include (all lighted): a football field, a lacrosse field (complete with two defibrillators, after a player was hit with a lacrosse ball in the heart), a Little League field, a Babe Ruth baseball field, a multipurpose area, a softball field, a picnic pavilion, a sand volleyball court, and a playground area.

Randolph Park covers 41 acres (17 ha). It has a beach. Other facilities include a beach house with a changing room, a refreshment stand, a picnic facilities, a playground area, a permanent docks for lap swimming, a volleyball court and a basketball court.

Heistein Park covers 44 acres (18 ha). Facilities include 6 soccer fields, 4 Little League/softball fields, a picnic pavilion, restrooms, a refreshment stand, and a lake for fishing and ice skating. Soccer tournaments are held here for travel team soccer.

Stonybrook Park covers 30 acres (12 ha). This park is used as a day camp during the summer months (June - August) and is divided by a local street to create east and west sections. Facilities include a field in the western portion, while the eastern portion hosts the day camp with a swimming pool, a small tot-lot, and various buildings for camp activities.

Kiwanis Park contains 1.8 acres (0.73 ha). Facilities include a playground, an open play area and picnic tables.

Rosenfarb Park facilities include a half-court basketball court and a picnic area.

Hidden Valley Park contains 51 acres (21 ha) of rolling hills, a pond and natural walking trails. The township's walking and biking trail cross the site.

Cohen Farm Park consists of an undeveloped 111 acres (45 ha). The township's 16-mile (26 km) trail system cuts through the park, connecting to Brundage Park and Freedom Park.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 144.95 miles (233.27 km) of roadways, of which 119.53 miles (192.36 km) were maintained by the municipality, 19.62 miles (31.58 km) by Morris County and 5.80 miles (9.33 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Route 10, Dover-Chester Road (County Route 513), and Sussex Turnpike (County Route 617) pass through township lines.

Public transportation

The NJ Transit 875 route serves the borough.

NJ Transit offered local bus service on the MCM2 and MCM7 routes which were eliminated due to budget constraints.

Community

Randolph has organized events, including high school sports, senior citizen gatherings, and various group activities. The public library schedules reading groups and other programs. Games and socials are held at the Senior Citizen Center at the Brundage Park Playhouse, which presents plays and musicals with youth and adult performers.

Recreation programs are available for children, teenagers and adults.

Summer camps are available for Kindergarteners - Grade 12 in various locations. Organizations are as follows: Grades K-2: Budding stars theatre camp (Brundage Park Playhouse) Grades K-5: Summer day camp Grades 6-8: Teen travel camp Ages 8–14: Summer stages (Brundage Park Playhouse) Grades 7-11: Advanced performance workshop (Brundage Park Playhouse) Grades K-12: Artworks studio summer camp


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