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Morris Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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For other places with similar names, see Morristown, New Jersey (disambiguation).
Morris Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Morris
Washington Valley Schoolhouse
Washington Valley Schoolhouse
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Morris Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Morris Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Formed March 25, 1740
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for Lewis Morris
Area
 • Total 15.762 sq mi (40.823 km2)
 • Land 15.618 sq mi (40.449 km2)
 • Water 0.144 sq mi (0.374 km2)  0.92%
Area rank 170th of 566 in state
13th of 39 in county
Elevation 433 ft (132 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 22,306
 • Estimate (2015) 22,633
 • Rank 114th of 566 in state
6th of 39 in county
 • Density 1,428.3/sq mi (551.5/km2)
 • Density rank 339th of 566 in state
19th of 39 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07960, 07961 - Convent Station
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3402748090
GNIS feature ID 0882193

Morris Township is a township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 22,306, reflecting an increase of 510 (+2.3%) from the 21,796 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,844 (+9.2%) from the 19,952 counted in the 1990 Census. It is known as the "doughnut" around Morristown since it completely encapsulates it, and has at least five times the area, though near Morris Plains the width of Morris Township is less than a mile.

History

Incorporation

Morris Township was originally formed as of March 25, 1740. Portions of the township were taken on December 24, 1740, to form Roxbury Township and on March 29, 1749, to form Mendham Township. Morris Township was incorporated as a township by the Township Act of 1798 by the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as part of the state's initial group of 104 townships. Portions of the township were taken to create Chatham Township (February 12, 1806), Morristown (April 6, 1865, fully independent in 1895) and Passaic Township (on March 23, 1866, now Long Hill Township). The township was named for Lewis Morris, colonial governor of New Jersey.

Arthur Seale

In 1992, Arthur Seale and his wife kidnapped Exxon executive Sidney Reso, a township resident, from his home. The Seals sought a ransom of $18.5 million, but Reso died in captivity. The case received nationwide attention.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 15.762 square miles (40.823 km2), including 15.618 square miles (40.449 km2) of land and 0.144 square miles (0.374 km2) of water (0.92%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Convent Station, Gillespie Hill, Loantaka Terrace, Normandy Heights, Normandy Park and Washington Valley.

Morris Township completely surrounds Morristown, making it part of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another. The township borders the Morris County municipalities of Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, Morris Plains and Hanover Township to the north, Harding Township to the south, Mendham Township and Randolph to the west and Florham Park and Madison to the east.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 3,753 *
1820 3,524 −6.1%
1830 3,536 0.3%
1840 4,013 13.5%
1850 4,992 24.4%
1860 5,985 19.9%
1870 5,674 −5.2%
1880 1,419 * −75.0%
1890 1,999 40.9%
1900 2,571 28.6%
1910 3,161 22.9%
1920 2,824 * −10.7%
1930 5,565 97.1%
1940 6,107 9.7%
1950 7,432 21.7%
1960 12,092 62.7%
1970 19,414 60.6%
1980 18,486 −4.8%
1990 19,952 7.9%
2000 21,796 9.2%
2010 22,306 2.3%
Est. 2015 22,633 1.5%
Population sources: 1810-1920
1840 1850-1870 1850
1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 22,306 people, 8,128 households, and 5,771 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,428.3 per square mile (551.5/km2). There were 8,502 housing units at an average density of 544.4 per square mile (210.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 85.28% (19,022) White, 5.65% (1,261) Black or African American, 0.10% (23) Native American, 5.12% (1,141) Asian, 0.03% (6) Pacific Islander, 1.99% (444) from other races, and 1.83% (409) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.55% (1,683) of the population.

There were 8,128 households out of which 31.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 61.3% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.0% were non-families. 23.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.08.

In the township, the population was spread out with 22.6% under the age of 18, 6.3% from 18 to 24, 23.7% from 25 to 44, 29.9% from 45 to 64, and 17.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.3 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 94.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $132,191 (with a margin of error of +/- $7,204) and the median family income was $154,265 (+/- $8,489). Males had a median income of $108,448 (+/- $5,932) versus $64,753 (+/- $12,368) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $65,335 (+/- $4,396). About 1.0% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.0% of those under age 18 and 10.3% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 21,796 people, 8,116 households, and 5,949 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,383.0 people per square mile (534.0/km²). There were 8,298 housing units at an average density of 526.5 per square mile (203.3/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 88.63% White, 5.46% African American, 0.15% Native American, 3.90% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.91% from other races, and 0.95% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.81% of the population.

There were 8,116 households out of which 31.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.6% were married couples living together, 6.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.7% were non-families. 21.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the township the population was spread out with 22.7% under the age of 18, 5.8% from 18 to 24, 28.2% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 15.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 64.9 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $101,902, and the median income for a family was $116,866. Males had a median income of $80,946 versus $50,864 for females. The per capita income for the township was $54,782. About 2.1% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 5.1% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 126.51 miles (203.60 km) of roadways, of which 106.11 miles (170.77 km) were maintained by the municipality, 13.96 miles (22.47 km) by Morris County and 6.44 miles (10.36 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

A few major roads pass through the community. Those include Route 124, Route 24, CR 510, U.S. Route 202, and Interstate 287.

Public transportation

Convent Station is a NJ Transit rail station located on the grounds of the College of Saint Elizabeth, offering service on the Morristown Line to Newark Broad Street Station, Secaucus Junction, Penn Station New York and Hoboken Terminal.

NJ Transit offers local bus service on the 872, 873, 875 and 880 routes, replacing service that had been offered on the MCM1, MCM2, MCM3, MCM4, MCM8 and MCM10 routes until 2010, when subsidies to the local provider were eliminated as part of budget cuts.

The Morris County Traction Company began trolley service in downtown Dover in July 1904, and expanded over the years until the system was completed in 1914 all the way to Newark, via Morristown and Summit, including service in Morris Township. The trolleys were replaced with buses in 1928.

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