Florence Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Florence Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Florence
Providence Presbyterian Church of Bustleton
Providence Presbyterian Church of Bustleton
Florence Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Florence Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Florence Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Florence Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 7, 1872
Named for Florence, Italy
Area
 • Total 10.177 sq mi (26.360 km2)
 • Land 9.780 sq mi (25.331 km2)
 • Water 0.397 sq mi (1.029 km2)  3.90%
Area rank 210th of 566 in state
20th of 40 in county
Elevation 39 ft (12 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 12,109
 • Estimate (2015) 12,688
 • Rank 202nd of 566 in state
12th of 40 in county
 • Density 1,238.1/sq mi (478.0/km2)
 • Density rank 356th of 566 in state
22nd of 40 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08518
Area code(s) 609 exchange: 499
FIPS code 3400523850
GNIS feature ID 0882107
Website www.florence-nj.gov

Florence Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 12,109, reflecting an increase of 1,363 (+12.7%) from the 10,746 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 480 (+4.7%) from the 10,266 counted in the 1990 Census.

Florence was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 7, 1872, from portions of Mansfield Township. The township was named for Florence, Italy.

History

Florence, NJ (1)
Business district of Florence Township

The Florence City Company, formed in 1849, organized the original layout of lots and streets in Florence. It also oversaw construction of the Florence Hotel and wharf. The Florence Iron Works was established in 1857 along the Delaware River by Richard Jones. It continued as a major force in the economy of the community, especially after ownership was transferred to Richard D. Wood in 1867. The 1900 United States Census reported that a good portion of the workforce was dependent on the foundry.

Florence was soon recognized as an attractive vacation spot with sandy beaches. Visitors could also partake of hydrotherapy offered by a center established about 1872 by Dr. Trall of Philadelphia.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 10.177 square miles (26.30 km2), including 9.780 square miles (25.331 km2) of land and 0.397 square miles (1.029 km2) of water (3.90%).

Florence CDP (with a 2010 Census population of 4,426) and Roebling (3,715) are unincorporated communities and census-designated places (CDPs) located within the township. As of the 2000 Census, the CDP's population was 8,200. Up to and including the 2000 United States Census, the two CDPs had been combined as Florence-Roebling, which had a total population of 8,200 in 2000.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Bustleton, Dobbins, Florence Station and Hoffner's Tract.

The township borders Bordentown Township, Burlington Township, Mansfield Township, Springfield Township in Burlington County; and Bristol Township, Falls Township and Tullytown across the Delaware River in Pennsylvania.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,528
1890 1,922 25.8%
1900 1,955 1.7%
1910 4,731 142.0%
1920 7,100 50.1%
1930 7,824 10.2%
1940 7,229 −7.6%
1950 7,455 3.1%
1960 8,127 9.0%
1970 8,560 5.3%
1980 9,084 6.1%
1990 10,266 13.0%
2000 10,746 4.7%
2010 12,109 12.7%
Est. 2015 12,688 4.8%
Population sources: 1880–2000
1880–1920 1880–1890
1890–1910 1910–1930
1930–1990
2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 12,109 people, 4,775 households, and 3,285 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,238.1 per square mile (478.0/km2). There were 5,053 housing units at an average density of 516.6 per square mile (199.5/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 78.43% (9,497) White, 12.23% (1,481) Black or African American, 0.19% (23) Native American, 5.04% (610) Asian, 0.06% (7) Pacific Islander, 1.00% (121) from other races, and 3.06% (370) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.76% (576) of the population.

There were 4,775 households out of which 28.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.7% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.2% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.54 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the township, the population was spread out with 22.2% under the age of 18, 7.2% from 18 to 24, 26.7% from 25 to 44, 31.3% from 45 to 64, and 12.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.0 years. For every 100 females there were 92.1 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $75,219 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,776) and the median family income was $88,479 (+/- $5,289). Males had a median income of $54,010 (+/- $3,496) versus $47,707 (+/- $2,587) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,871 (+/- $1,737). About 1.4% of families and 2.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 10,746 people, 4,149 households, and 2,891 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,106.5 people per square mile (427.3/km²). There were 4,391 housing units at an average density of 452.1 per square mile (174.6/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 85.52% White, 9.74% African American, 0.18% Native American, 2.35% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.65% from other races, and 1.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.35% of the population.

There were 4,149 households out of which 33.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.9% were married couples living together, 13.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.3% were non-families. 25.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the township the population was spread out with 25.2% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 31.9% from 25 to 44, 23.6% from 45 to 64, and 11.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 91.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.1 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $56,843, and the median income for a family was $67,412. Males had a median income of $45,325 versus $31,215 for females. The per capita income for the township was $23,529. About 4.8% of families and 6.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 7.5% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 67.24 miles (108.21 km) of roadways, of which 45.31 miles (72.92 km) were maintained by the municipality, 14.11 miles (22.71 km) by Burlington County and 4.52 miles (7.27 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 3.30 miles (5.31 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

Florence hosts a section of the New Jersey Turnpike, which extends from Burlington Township on the west and continues for 3.3 miles (5.3 km) into Mansfield Township.

The section includes Interchange 6A on the Pennsylvania Extension, which had been connected with Cedar Lane at an odd roadway setup (where Cedar Lane overpasses itself) the locals term the "whirlybird" until 1999, when the Authority constructed a double-trumpet interchange at US 130. The 6 toll gate is just east of Exit 6A on the Pennsylvania Extension. Interchange 6 (itself) is located in Mansfield Township.

Other highways and roads in the township include Interstate 295 U.S. Route 130 and County Route 543.

Public transportation

The NJ Transit River Line light rail system offers service in the township at Florence station at U.S. Route 130 and Roebling station at Hornberger Avenue providing southbound service to Camden and the Walter Rand Transportation Center (with transfers available to the PATCO Speedline) and northbound service to the Trenton Rail Station with connections to NJ Transit trains to New York City, SEPTA trains to Philadelphia, and Amtrak trains on the Northeast Corridor.

NJ Transit provides bus service on the 409 route between Trenton and Philadelphia.

BurLink bus service is offered on the B5 route between the Florence light rail station and Haines Industrial Center.


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