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Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey facts for kids

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See also: Springfield Township, Union County, New Jersey
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Springfield Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Springfield
Arneys Mount, the highest point in Burlington County, in Springfield Township
Arneys Mount, the highest point in Burlington County, in Springfield Township
Springfield Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Springfield Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Springfield Township, Burlington County, New Jersey
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Coordinates: 40°02′28″N 74°42′36″W / 40.041216°N 74.710125°W / 40.041216; -74.710125Coordinates: 40°02′28″N 74°42′36″W / 40.041216°N 74.710125°W / 40.041216; -74.710125
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Formed November 6, 1688
Royal charter January 13, 1713
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Government
 • Type Faulkner Act (council–manager)
 • Body Township Council
Area
 • Total 29.57 sq mi (76.58 km2)
 • Land 29.51 sq mi (76.44 km2)
 • Water 0.06 sq mi (0.15 km2)  0.19%
Area rank 92nd of 565 in state
10th of 40 in county
Elevation
69 ft (21 m)
Population
 • Total 3,414
 • Estimate 
(2019)
3,257
 • Rank 435th of 566 in state
32nd of 40 in county
 • Density 114.0/sq mi (44.0/km2)
 • Density rank 535th of 566 in state
37th of 40 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08041 - Jobstown
08042 - Juliustown
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3400569990
GNIS feature ID 0882106

Springfield Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 3,414 reflecting an increase of 187 (+5.8%) from the 3,227 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 199 (+6.6%) from the 3,028 counted in the 1990 Census.

History

Springfield was originally formed on November 6, 1688, and reformed by Royal charter on January 13, 1713. Springfield Township was incorporated by the Township Act of 1798 of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships. Portions of the township were taken on December 2, 1723, to form New Hanover Township. The township's name derives from springs and brooks in the area.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 30.001 square miles (77.701 km2), including 29.940 square miles (77.544 km2) of land and 0.061 square miles (0.157 km2) of water (0.20%).

Juliustown (2010 Census population of 429) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located entirely within Springfield Township, while Fort Dix (total population of 7,716 as of 2010) is a CDP located in parts of Springfield Township, New Hanover Township and Pemberton Township.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Arneys Mount, Chambers Corner, Ellis, Folwell, Jacksonville, Jobstown, Pine Lane and Powell.

The township borders the Burlington County communities of Burlington Township, Chesterfield Township, Eastampton Township, Florence Township, Mansfield Township, North Hanover Township, Pemberton Township and Wrightstown.

The township is one of 56 South Jersey municipalities that are included within the New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve, a protected natural area of unique ecology covering 1,100,000 acres (450,000 ha), that has been classified as a United States Biosphere Reserve and established by Congress in 1978 as the nation's first National Reserve. Part of the township is included in the state-designated Pinelands Area, which includes portions of Burlington County, along with areas in Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester and Ocean counties.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,500
1820 1,568 4.5%
1830 1,534 −2.2%
1840 1,632 6.4%
1850 1,827 11.9%
1860 1,810 −0.9%
1870 1,761 −2.7%
1880 1,886 7.1%
1890 1,670 −11.5%
1900 1,382 −17.2%
1910 1,278 −7.5%
1920 1,223 −4.3%
1930 1,326 8.4%
1940 1,299 −2.0%
1950 1,562 20.2%
1960 1,956 25.2%
1970 2,244 14.7%
1980 2,691 19.9%
1990 3,028 12.5%
2000 3,227 6.6%
2010 3,414 5.8%
2019 (est.) 3,257 −4.6%
Population sources:
1810-2000 1810-1920 1840
1850-1870 1850 1870
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 3,414 people, 1,162 households, and 941 families residing in the township. The population density was 114.0 per square mile (44.0/km2). There were 1,217 housing units at an average density of 40.6 per square mile (15.7/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 90.60% (3,093) White, 3.81% (130) Black or African American, 0.21% (7) Native American, 2.55% (87) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.20% (41) from other races, and 1.64% (56) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.72% (127) of the population.

There were 1,162 households out of which 33.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.4% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.0% were non-families. 13.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.93 and the average family size was 3.24.

In the township, the population was spread out with 23.0% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 20.3% from 25 to 44, 35.4% from 45 to 64, and 13.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.3 years. For every 100 females there were 102.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 103.0 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $85,417 (with a margin of error of +/- $13,463) and the median family income was $102,337 (+/- $14,017). Males had a median income of $62,813 (+/- $16,928) versus $47,361 (+/- $11,194) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,901 (+/- $4,219). About 2.6% of families and 3.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and 1.4% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 3,227 people, 1,098 households, and 906 families residing in the township. The population density was 107.4 people per square mile (41.5/km2). There were 1,138 housing units at an average density of 37.9 per square mile (14.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 91.94% White, 3.22% African American, 0.31% Native American, 2.63% Asian, 0.22% from other races, and 1.67% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.77% of the population.

There were 1,098 households, out of which 36.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 73.4% were married couples living together, 5.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.4% were non-families. 13.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.93 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the township the population was spread out, with 25.8% under the age of 18, 5.7% from 18 to 24, 29.0% from 25 to 44, 28.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 100.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 97.7 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $69,268, and the median income for a family was $72,292. Males had a median income of $49,044 versus $31,392 for females. The per capita income for the township was $29,322. About 2.8% of families and 3.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.2% of those under age 18 and 8.5% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

Burlington County Fairgrounds (home of the annual Farm Fair) opened in 2011 at the intersection of Route 206 and Columbus-Jobstown Road.

Transportation

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 72.72 miles (117.03 km) of roadways, of which 34.05 miles (54.80 km) were maintained by the municipality, 29.29 miles (47.14 km) by Burlington County and 7.01 miles (11.28 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 2.37 miles (3.81 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

The major county routes that pass through are County Route 537 in the eastern part and County Route 545 also in the eastern part briefly. State and U.S. routes include U.S. Route 206 that runs through the center and Route 68 in the eastern section.

The major limited access roads that traverse are Interstate 295 and the New Jersey Turnpike, both in the western part of the township. No interchanges along these highways are located in the township, with the closest interchanges that are accessible are Exit 47 (along I-295) in neighboring Burlington Township and Exits 5, 6A and 6 (along the Turnpike) in neighboring Westampton, Florence and Mansfield Townships, respectively.

There is no public transportation in the township.

Points of interest

Education

The Springfield Township School District serves students in pre-kindergarten through sixth grade at Springfield Township School. As of the 2018–19 school year, the district, comprised of one school, had an enrollment of 226 students and 22.7 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 10.0:1.

Public school students in seventh through twelfth grades attend the schools of the Northern Burlington County Regional School District, which also serves students from Chesterfield Township, Mansfield Township, North Hanover Township, along with children of military personnel based at Joint Base McGuire–Dix–Lakehurst. As of the 2018–19 school year, the high school district, comprised of two schools, had an enrollment of 2,190 students and 163.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.4:1. The schools in the district (with 2018–19 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Northern Burlington County Regional Middle School with 811 students in grades 7 - 8 and

Northern Burlington County Regional High School with 1,348 students in grades 9-12. Both schools are in the Columbus section of Mansfield Township. Using a formula that reflects the population and the value of the assessed property in each of the constituent municipalities, taxpayers in Springfield Township pay 17.7% of the district's tax levy, with the district's 2013-14 budget including $35.6 million in spending. The 7-12 district's board of education has nine members, who are elected directly by voters to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with three seats up for election each year. The nine seats on the regional district's board of education are allocated based on the population of the constituent municipalities, with one seat assigned to Springfield Township.

Students from Springfield Township, and from all of Burlington County, are eligible to attend the Burlington County Institute of Technology, a countywide public school district that serves the vocational and technical education needs of students at the high school and post-secondary level at its campuses in Medford and Westampton Township.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Springfield Township include:

  • Reading Wood Black (1830–1867), founder of Uvalde County, Texas and the city of Uvalde, Texas.
  • Irving Fryar (born 1962), former NFL wide receiver.
  • Phil Haines (born 1950), New Jersey Superior Court judge who served in the New Jersey Senate from 2008 to 2010.
  • Reuben Moon (1847-1914), Congressman who represented PA's 4th congressional district.
  • Thomas Newbold (1760-1823), member of the United States House of Representatives for New Jersey from 1807 to 1813.
  • Joe Ohl (1888-1951), MLB pitcher who played for the Washington Senators.
  • Daniel Trotter (1747-1800), furniture maker from Philadelphia, bought 12 acres of land in Springfield Townwhip in 1781
  • Barclay White (1821–1906), Superintendent of Indian Affairs during the administration of President Ulysses S. Grant.

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