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Hopewell, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Hopewell
House in Hopewell
House in Hopewell
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hopewell, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hopewell, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Mercer
Incorporated April 14, 1891
Area
 • Total 0.703 sq mi (1.820 km2)
 • Land 0.703 sq mi (1.820 km2)
 • Water 0.000 sq mi (0.000 km2)  0.00%
Area rank 529th of 565 in state
12th of 12 in county
Elevation 197 ft (60 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 1,922
 • Estimate (2015) 1,929
 • Rank 488th of 565 in state
12th of 12 in county
 • Density 2,735.2/sq mi (1,056.1/km2)
 • Density rank 227th of 565 in state
3rd of 12 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08525
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3402133150
GNIS feature ID 885260
Website www.hopewellboro-nj.us

Hopewell is a borough in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 1,922, reflecting a decline of 113 (-5.6%) from the 2,035 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 67 (+3.4%) from the 1,968 counted in the 1990 Census.

Hopewell was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 14, 1891, from portions of Hopewell Township, based on the results of a referendum held on March 21, 1891. Additional portions of Hopewell Township were annexed in 1915, and the borough was reincorporated in 1924.

History

Colonial era

The first Colonial influence in Hopewell was the purchase of a 30,000-acre (120 km2) tract of land by Daniel Coxe a Royal British governor of West Jersey, in the latter half of the 17th century. All land in Hopewell can be traced back to this purchase. In 1691 Coxe, transferred his land to a company called The West Jersey Society of England, who intended to sell the land. The society appointed an agent, Thomas Revell, to preside over the land and sell it to prospective buyers. Revell then attracted settlers from New England, Long Island, and New Jersey with questionable incentives, saying that the land was fertile, and tame. However, the families that arrived in Hopewell only found vast stretches of wilderness. The first settler in Hopewell Valley was Thomas Tindall who on November 10, 1699 bought a 300-acre (1.2 km2) tract of land from The West Jersey Society of England through Revell, for "ten pounds per hundred acres". Other early settlers in Hopewell are said to be the Stouts, who immigrated from Holmdel to Hopewell in 1706. Perhaps the first conflict between colonists in Hopewell was the dispute between Revell and the early inhabitants of Hopewell, who realized that their deeds were worthless due to Revell's false claims. Fifty settlers then organized a class action lawsuit against Revell and the West Jersey Society. The long and arduous trial took place in Burlington, and eventually ruled against the settlers, who were forced to repurchase their land or relocate. Many settlers weren't able to repay and moved north into North Jersey and New York.

On April 23, 1715, the settlers who stayed in Hopewell, most notably the Stout family, organized the Old School Baptist Church, and what is now known as Hopewell was then referred to as "Baptist Meetinghouse". One of the most valued members of the meeting house was Declaration of Independence signer John Hart who in 1740 purchased 193 acres (0.78 km2) of land in the north of current day Hopewell, and in 1747 as a sign of Hart's devotion to the Church, donated a plot of his land to the Baptists. The very next year the Baptists made good use of this land and in 1748 erected their Old School Baptist Church meeting house on West Broad Street. The meeting house brought in Baptists from miles around to Hopewell and encouraged Hopewell's early growth.

HOPEWELL ACADEMY SIGN IN HOPEWELL BOROUGH, MERCER NJ

Numerous lumber mills were established in and around Hopewell at this time to process the lumber that was generated from the clearing of forests for farms.

In 1756, Isaac Eaton the first pastor of the Old School Baptist Church established the Hopewell Academy. One of his students, James Manning, would go on to establish Brown University in 1765.

Frog war

The first railroad to reach Hopewell was the Mercer and Somerset Railway, which was backed by the Pennsylvania Railroad. It was created largely to protect the monopoly the Pennsylvania Railroad had on New Jersey, by cutting off the first separately owned railroad in New Jersey, the Delaware and Bound Brook Railroad, by being built in the way of it. It was completed in 1874. The Delaware and Bound Brook reached Hopewell in 1876, but the railroad had to cross the Mercer and Somerset's track just to the northwest of Hopewell. A dispute occurred at the crossing, known as a frog, and escalated into each company parking locomotives over the crossing to prevent the other company from moving trains over it. Eventually militia had to be called in to keep the peace, and the Delaware and Bound Brook prevailed. Soon after the Frog War the Mercer and Somerset was liquidated having failed at its purpose. Some of the abandoned right of way for the Mercer and Somerset in Hopewell became Model Avenue. The Delaware and Bound Brook was leased by the Philadelphia and Reading in 1879 for 999 years, and has become the CSX Trenton Line and is still in use today. The Frog is also what gives Hopewell Elementary school it mascot, "Freddy the Frog" in honor of the Hopewell frog war.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.703 square miles (1.820 km2), all of which was land.

The borough is an independent municipality surrounded entirely by Hopewell Township, making it part one of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 980
1910 1,073 9.5%
1920 1,339 24.8%
1930 1,467 9.6%
1940 1,678 14.4%
1950 1,869 11.4%
1960 1,928 3.2%
1970 2,271 17.8%
1980 2,001 −11.9%
1990 1,968 −1.6%
2000 2,035 3.4%
2010 1,922 −5.6%
Est. 2015 1,929 0.4%
Population sources:1900-1920
1900-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 1,922 people, 778 households, and 532.2 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,735.2 per square mile (1,056.1/km2). There were 817 housing units at an average density of 1,162.7 per square mile (448.9/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 95.06% (1,827) White, 1.51% (29) Black or African American, 0.10% (2) Native American, 0.68% (13) Asian, 0.05% (1) Pacific Islander, 1.51% (29) from other races, and 1.09% (21) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.69% (71) of the population.

There were 778 households out of which 33.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.6% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.6% were non-families. 25.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 24.0% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 22.2% from 25 to 44, 36.3% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 42.8 years. For every 100 females there were 91.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 87.7 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $105,417 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,866) and the median family income was $125,066 (+/- $15,420). Males had a median income of $91,375 (+/- $14,302) versus $55,357 (+/- $11,473) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $50,910 (+/- $5,465). About 0.0% of families and 0.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 2,035 people, 813 households, and 561 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,963.7 people per square mile (1,138.7/km2). There were 836 housing units at an average density of 1,217.5 per square mile (467.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 95.43% White, 1.08% African American, 0.49% Native American, 0.98% Asian, 1.23% from other races, and 0.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.31% of the population.

There were 813 households out of which 36.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 55.0% were married couples living together, 11.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.9% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.01.

In the borough the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 30.7% from 25 to 44, 27.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 94.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.3 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $77,270, and the median income for a family was $91,205. Males had a median income of $52,656 versus $47,315 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $38,413. None of the families and 2.1% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 5.2% of those over 64.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 9.35 miles (15.05 km) of roadways, of which 7.56 miles (12.17 km) were maintained by the municipality and 1.79 miles (2.88 km) by Mercer County.

Hopewell has four major roads that travel through it. Route 518 Enters Hopewell from due west having come from Lambertville and then turns slightly northward, joining West Broad Street. Route 518 then runs through Hopewell and exits Hopewell in the East and heads towards Rocky Hill. Pennington Hopewell Road enters Hopewell from roughly the southwest, and immediately becomes West Broad street when it enters Hopewell. It connects Hopewell with Pennington to the south. Princeton Avenue, Route 569 starts at Broad Street and continues south and becomes Hopewell Princeton Road, and connects Hopewell with Princeton. Greenwood Avenue runs north out of Hopewell and connects Hopewell with Amwell

Rail

NJ Transit is planning to restore passenger commuter rail service to Hopewell. New Jersey Transit plans to use the existing one track right of way that CSX owns through Hopewell, the former four-track Reading Company Trenton Line. The proposed plan includes double tracking most of the CSX line to increase capacity and construction of a new rail station on Somerset Street. The use of the historic Hopewell Station is not under consideration in this current proposal. The line would connect Hopewell with New York City, as well as Philadelphia via a SEPTA connection in West Trenton and restore service to Hopewell, which ended in 1982.


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