Allamuchy Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Allamuchy Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Allamuchy
Entering Allamuchy Township along Alphano Road
Entering Allamuchy Township along Alphano Road
Map of Allamuchy Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Allamuchy Township in Warren County. Inset: Location of Warren County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Allamuchy Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Allamuchy Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Warren
Incorporated April 4, 1873
Named for Native American word "Allamachetey" ("place within the hills")
Area
 • Total 20.763 sq mi (53.777 km2)
 • Land 20.454 sq mi (52.977 km2)
 • Water 0.309 sq mi (0.800 km2)  1.49%
Area rank 136th of 566 in state
9th of 22 in county
Elevation 623 ft (190 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 4,323
 • Estimate (2015) 4,556
 • Rank 398th of 566 in state
11th of 22 in county
 • Density 211.3/sq mi (81.6/km2)
 • Density rank 502nd of 566 in state
14th of 22 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07820
Area code(s) 908 exchanges: 813, 852
FIPS code 3404100670
GNIS feature ID 0882243
Website www.allamuchynj.org

Allamuchy Township is a township in Warren County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 4,323, reflecting an increase of 446 (+11.5%) from the 3,877 counted in the 2000 Census.

Allamuchy Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on April 4, 1873, from portions of Independence Township. The township's name comes from the Native American word "Allamachetey", meaning "place within the hills".

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 20.763 square miles (53.777 km2), including 20.454 square miles (52.977 km2) of land and 0.309 square miles (0.800 km2) of water (1.49%). The townships southeastern border is formed by the Musconetcong River.

Allamuchy CDP (with a 2010 Census population of 78) and Panther Valley (2010 population of 3,327) are census-designated places and unincorporated communities located within the township. As of the 2000 United States Census, the two CDPs were consolidated as Allamuchy-Panther Valley, which had a 2000 Census population of 3,125.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Alphano, Long Bridge, Quaker Church, Saxton Falls and Warrenville.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1880 648
1890 759 17.1%
1900 588 −22.5%
1910 642 9.2%
1920 556 −13.4%
1930 684 23.0%
1940 686 0.3%
1950 736 7.3%
1960 973 32.2%
1970 1,138 17.0%
1980 2,560 125.0%
1990 3,484 36.1%
2000 3,877 11.3%
2010 4,323 11.5%
Est. 2015 4,556 17.5%
Population sources:
1880-1920 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,323 people, 1,953 households, and 1,213 families residing in the township. The population density was 211.3 per square mile (81.6/km2). There were 2,096 housing units at an average density of 102.5 per square mile (39.6/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 93.45% (4,040) White, 1.78% (77) Black or African American, 0.14% (6) Native American, 2.73% (118) Asian, 0.02% (1) Pacific Islander, 0.39% (17) from other races, and 1.48% (64) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.49% (194) of the population.

There were 1,953 households out of which 22.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.7% were married couples living together, 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.9% were non-families. 31.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.21 and the average family size was 2.80.

In the township, the population was spread out with 18.5% under the age of 18, 5.0% from 18 to 24, 25.4% from 25 to 44, 33.6% from 45 to 64, and 17.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45.8 years. For every 100 females there were 90.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 85.5 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $82,781 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,051) and the median family income was $104,601 (+/- $18,824). Males had a median income of $76,467 (+/- $14,328) versus $55,625 (+/- $6,142) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $49,834 (+/- $4,833). About 0.9% of families and 2.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.8% of those under age 18 and 4.6% of those age 65 or over.

Culture and tourism

Rutherfurd Hall is a cultural center and museum that provides educational and enrichment opportunities for the residents of Allamuchy, the surrounding communities, and the greater New York – New Jersey Highlands region at large. It conducts and hosts public programs including: 4th of July Fireworks, Hall of Haunts, Scouting, Teas & Talks, etiquette courses, lectures, concerts, specialty summer camps and weddings. A family seat for the decedents of Walter Rutherfurd and Senator John Rutherfurd, Rutherfurd Hall was designed by Whitney Warren and the Olmsted Brothers and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 2013.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 36.90 miles (59.38 km) of roadways, of which 10.59 miles (17.04 km) were maintained by the municipality, 19.49 miles (31.37 km) by Warren County and 6.82 miles (10.98 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Interstate 80 crosses Allamuchy Township, and is accessible at Exit 19, County Route 517. Many choose the Allamuchy area because of its proximity to New York City.

Public transportation

Allamuchy Township was formerly served by the Allamuchy Train Station and Allamuchy Freight House until passenger service on the Lehigh and Hudson River Railway was ended in 1933. The Allamuchy Freight House is listed on the National Historic Register of Historic Places.

Notable events

  • In 1865 Lewis Morris Rutherfurd took the first telescopic photographs of the moon from his home at Tranquility Farm in Allamuchy.
  • In 1902, Winthrop Rutherfurd commissioned Grand Central Station architect Whitney Warren to design Rutherfurd Hall. Completed in 1906, the Hall served as a hunting lodge family residence where prominent guests could be entertained, most famously U.S. president Franklin D. Roosevelt who was a close friend of Winthrop's second wife Lucy. The Rutherfurd family gave the Hall to the Catholic Church in 1959 after the completion of Interstate 80 brought more traffic and noise to the area. The Church changed the Hall's name to Villa Madonna and used it as a convent for an order of nuns for five decades before selling it the town to be used as a museum and community education facility. Now on the National Historic Register, Rutherfurd Hall first opened to the public in 2012.
  • In the early 1920s, the schoolhouse in Quaker Grove (part of present-day Allamuchy) was the site of experimental research in rural education by Fannie W. Dunn and Maria A. Everett, both of whom were from Teachers' College, Columbia University. The result of their fieldwork was Four Years in a County School (New York: Bureau of Publications, Teachers' College, Columbia University, 1926) which detailed their findings with regards to the single-teacher model, curriculum, and observations about rural education in general.
  • In 1972 a left-wing group called the Allamuchy Tribe, led by activists Rennie Davis and Jerry Rubin and funded by ex-Beatle John Lennon, met at the Peter Stuyvesant Farm in Allamuchy to organize protests against the 1972 Republican National Convention. FBI surveillance of the Allamuchy Tribe led to the Bureau putting pressure on Lennon to divest from political activity by threatening to deport him.

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