Piqua, Ohio facts for kids

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Piqua, Ohio
City
Aerial view of Piqua
Aerial view of Piqua
Motto: "Where Vision becomes reality"
Location of Piqua, Ohio
Location of Piqua, Ohio
Location of Piqua in Miami County
Location of Piqua in Miami County
Country United States
State Ohio
County Miami
Area
 • Total 11.89 sq mi (30.79 km2)
 • Land 11.62 sq mi (30.10 km2)
 • Water 0.27 sq mi (0.70 km2)
Elevation 873 ft (266 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 20,522
 • Estimate (2012) 20,619
 • Density 1,766.1/sq mi (681.9/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 45356
Area code(s) 937
FIPS code 39-62848
GNIS feature ID 1061544
Website http://www.piquaoh.org/

Piqua /ˈpɪkwə/ PIK-wə is a city in Miami County, Ohio, United States. The population was 20,522 at the 2010 census. It is part of the Dayton Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Piqua was one of the cities that suffered severe flooding during the Great Dayton Flood of 1913.

History

In 1747, Fort Pickawillany was constructed by the British to protect their trading post at a Miami village of the same name. It was located at the confluence of Loramie Creek and the Great Miami River. (The present city of Piqua developed about a mile to the southwest.) In 1752 Charles de Langlade, an Ottawa war chief of partial French Canadian descent, attacked the fort. He led more than 240 Ottawa and Ojibwe warriors allied with French forces against the British and the Miami village in the Battle of Pickawillany. The Miami chief and a British trader were killed in the conflict.

After the battle, the British and Miami abandoned this site. The Miami rebuilt Pickawillany, and Piqua later developed near their village. The British soon took over the area after defeating the French in the Seven Years' War (1754-1763), known in British North America as the French and Indian War.

Piqua was settled as two separate communities in 1780, known as Upper Piqua and Lower Piqua. The two villages united by 1800. Officially incorporated in 1807, Piqua developed along with construction of the Miami and Erie Canal.

The word 'Piqua' is believed to be derived from a Shawnee language phrase: Othath-He-Waugh-Pe-Qua, translated as "He has risen from the ashes," related to a legend of the people. It became associated with the Pekowi, one of the five divisions of the Shawnee people, who were eventually known as the Piqua.

This local Shawnee history was also the source of the name of the community of Shawnee, founded in 1797 on the east side of the Great Miami River. It is adjacent to the former Pennsylvania Railroad corridor, later used by the merged Penn Central Transportation and subsequently by Conrail. Shawnee has long since been incorporated into Piqua. The Piqua High School Indians athletic teams took their mascot name from the local Native American history.

Rossville (since incorporated into Piqua) was an early local African-American settlement. Virginia planter John Randolph of Roanoke, who served as a US Representative and Senator, arranged for the emancipation of his nearly 400 slaves in his will of 1833. He also provided money for his executor to relocate the freedmen to the free state of Ohio, and to buy land and supplies to help them establish a settlement. The will was challenged but in 1846, his 383 slaves gained their freedom. Most of these freedmen settled in Rumley, Ohio. Some eventually founded Rossville and an associated cemetery, known as the African Jackson Cemetery. These are located on the northeast side of the Great Miami River; they may be accessed by nearby North County Road 25-A.

'Atomic City'

Piqua was home to the first municipally operated nuclear power plant, the Piqua Nuclear Generating Station. It operated from 1962 to 1966, leading to Piqua being nicknamed "The Atomic City." This major demonstration project was a failure. The United States Atomic Energy Commission (now US Department of Energy) bought out the contract with the City of Piqua, in order to terminate the operations early. During this period a name brand automotive battery was manufactured and marketed locally as the "Piqua Atomic Power Plant."

Notable buildings

Fort Piqua Hotel from southeast
Fort Piqua Hotel is one of four sites in Piqua listed on the National Register of Historic Places

The "Orr-Statler Block" building at the corner of Main and High Streets was erected in 1891 and long dominated downtown. For many years its core tenant was a hotel of more than 100 rooms, first known as the "Plaza," later as the "Favorite," and finally as the "Fort Piqua." The hotel closed in the 1980s.

The building's street-level commercial spaces were occupied by a variety of businesses over the years, including a barbershop, grocer, bank, the local telephone company business office, Western Union, a combination bus station and taxi office with a very popular soda fountain and lunch counter, and others. Just prior to the start of the Prohibition era, the hotel's bar was moved to the basement level. It is rumored to have closed only its outside entrance during those years, operating as a speakeasy.

The building suffered disrepair and neglect for a period, and renewal plans seemed unable to secure funding. In a public-private redevelopment, the building was fully renovated during a two-year project. Since 2008, its major tenant has been the city's public library. In addition, the building is the location of Mulligan's Pub, a full-scale restaurant and bar, complete with a patio for live entertainment. The building is now known as Fort Piqua Plaza.

Geography

Piqua is located at 40°8′51″N 84°14′53″W / 40.1475°N 84.24806°W / 40.1475; -84.24806 (40.147474, -84.247968).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 11.89 square miles (30.79 km2), of which 11.62 square miles (30.10 km2) is land and 0.27 square miles (0.70 km2) is water.

The Great Miami River runs through Piqua. The area at the south end of town on the east side of the river is known as Shawnee.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 287
1820 350 22.0%
1830 488 39.4%
1840 1,480 203.3%
1850 3,277 121.4%
1860 4,616 40.9%
1870 5,967 29.3%
1880 6,031 1.1%
1890 9,090 50.7%
1900 12,172 33.9%
1910 13,388 10.0%
1920 15,044 12.4%
1930 16,009 6.4%
1940 16,049 0.2%
1950 17,447 8.7%
1960 19,219 10.2%
1970 20,741 7.9%
1980 20,480 −1.3%
1990 20,612 0.6%
2000 20,738 0.6%
2010 20,522 −1.0%
Est. 2015 20,790 1.3%
Sources:

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 20,522 people, 8,318 households, and 5,425 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,766.1 inhabitants per square mile (681.9/km2). There were 9,311 housing units at an average density of 801.3 per square mile (309.4/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.4% White, 3.3% African American, 0.2% Native American, 0.7% Asian, 0.4% from other races, and 2.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.4% of the population.

There were 8,318 households of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.9% were married couples living together, 14.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 6.1% had a male householder with no wife present, and 34.8% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 2.96.

The median age in the city was 38.1 years. 24.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 8.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 25.6% were from 25 to 44; 26.2% were from 45 to 64; and 14.7% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 48.0% male and 52.0% female.

2000 census

As of the census of 2000, there were 20,738 people, 8,263 households, and 5,585 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,939.2 people per square mile (749.0/km²). There were 8,886 housing units at an average density of 830.9 per square mile (320.9/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 94.21% White, 3.38% African American, 0.33% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 0.27% from other races, and 1.37% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.74% of the population.

There were 8,263 households out of which 32.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.4% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.4% were non-families. 27.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.47 and the average family size was 2.99.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 28.9% from 25 to 44, 21.3% from 45 to 64, and 14.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $35,681, and the median income for a family was $41,804. Males had a median income of $31,808 versus $22,241 for females. The per capita income for the city was $18,719. About 9.6% of families and 12.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.0% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over.

In popular culture

  • Dav Pilkey's Captain Underpants children's book is set in Piqua. It was chosen because of its now discontinued annual "Underwear Festival" and history of manufacturing.

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