Garfield, New Jersey facts for kids

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Garfield, New Jersey
City
City of Garfield
Street scene
Street scene
Nickname(s): "City of Champions"
Map highlighting Garfield's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Garfield's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Garfield, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Garfield, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated March 15, 1898 (as Borough)
April 19, 1917 (as City)
Named for James Garfield
Area
 • Total 2.160 sq mi (5.594 km2)
 • Land 2.099 sq mi (5.436 km2)
 • Water 0.061 sq mi (0.158 km2)  2.82%
Area rank 398th of 566 in state
45th of 70 in county
Elevation 98 ft (30 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 30,487
 • Estimate (2015) 31,802
 • Rank 73rd of 566 in state
5th of 70 in county
 • Density 14,524.8/sq mi (5,608.1/km2)
 • Density rank 15th of 566 in state
4th of 70 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07026
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3400325770
GNIS feature ID 0876557
Website www.garfieldnj.org
Garfield NJ 1909
Bird's-eye view of Garfield New Jersey, image from memory.loc.gov
Post Ford at River Drive and Columbus Ave in Garfield NJ
Post Ford at River Drive and Columbus Ave - Revolutionary War Monument

Garfield is a city in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 30,487, reflecting an increase of 701 (+2.4%) from the 29,786 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,059 (+11.4%) from the 26,727 counted in the 1990 Census.

When the area that is now Garfield was first developed in 1873, it was known as East Passaic. In 1881, the community's name was changed to Garfield in honor of President of the United States James Garfield. There are two explanations given for the circumstances behind the renaming. According to one, shortly after Garfield was elected to the presidency the founder of East Passaic said, "tell everyone...don't speak of East Passaic anymore; call it 'Garfield' after the man who will lead this great country to prosperity." Seven months later, President Garfield was assassinated but his name remained with the community. The second theory holds that after Garfield's death in 1881, a new train station was named in his honor, which in turn led to the surrounding area becoming associated with his name as well.

Garfield was originally incorporated as a borough on March 15, 1898, from portions of Saddle River Township and Wallington. At the time, the New Jersey Legislature set Garfield's boundaries as they exist today. On April 19, 1917, the borough became the City of Garfield, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 2.160 square miles (5.594 km2), including 2.099 square miles (5.436 km2) of land and 0.061 square miles (0.158 km2) of water (2.82%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Belmont, Bogart Heights, Dundee Dam and Plauderville.

The city has land borders with adjacent Elmwood Park, Lodi, Saddle Brook and South Hackensack. The Saddle River is a shared border with Wallington. There are three bridges over the Passaic River crossing the municipal and county line to Passaic and Clifton in Passaic County.

Environment

The United States Environmental Protection Agency has identified Garfield as the site of groundwater contaminated hexavalent chromium from a spill in 1983 at the E.C. Electroplating Corporation site. In 2016, the EPA announced a $37 million project to cleanup contamination at the site using Superfund money, as the company responsible for the spill of 3,600 US gallons (14,000 l; 3,000 imp gal) of chromic acid is no longer in business.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1890 1,028
1900 3,504 240.9%
1910 10,213 191.5%
1920 19,381 89.8%
1930 29,739 53.4%
1940 28,044 −5.7%
1950 27,550 −1.8%
1960 29,253 6.2%
1970 30,797 5.3%
1980 26,803 −13.0%
1990 26,727 −0.3%
2000 29,786 11.4%
2010 30,487 2.4%
Est. 2015 31,802 4.3%
Population sources:
1890-1920 1880-1890
1890-1930 1900-2010
2000 2010

The borough is also home to an architecturally prominent Russian Orthodox church, which serves the growing Ukrainian American community in western Bergen County.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 30,487 people, 11,073 households, and 7,718 families residing in the city. The population density was 14,524.8 per square mile (5,608.1/km2). There were 11,788 housing units at an average density of 5,616.1 per square mile (2,168.4/km2)*. The racial makeup of the city was 76.73% (23,393) White, 6.50% (1,981) Black or African American, 0.43% (132) Native American, 2.22% (678) Asian, 0.01% (2) Pacific Islander, 10.85% (3,307) from other races, and 3.26% (994) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 32.24% (9,830) of the population.

There were 11,073 households out of which 33.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.2% were married couples living together, 17.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.3% were non-families. 24.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.75 and the average family size was 3.29.

In the city, the population was spread out with 23.3% under the age of 18, 9.2% from 18 to 24, 30.9% from 25 to 44, 25.4% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.5 years. For every 100 females there were 91.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.0 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $51,407 (with a margin of error of +/- $1,842) and the median family income was $56,701 (+/- $5,020). Males had a median income of $42,927 (+/- $1,953) versus $33,231 (+/- $3,471) for females. The per capita income for the city was $24,022 (+/- $1,348). About 9.8% of families and 13.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.0% of those under age 18 and 16.2% of ages 65 years or over.

Same-sex couples headed 68 households in 2010.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 29,786 people, 11,250 households, and 7,425 families residing in the city. The population density was 13,976.0 people per square mile (5,399.3/km2). There were 11,698 housing units at an average density of 5,488.8 per square mile (2,120.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 82.11% White, 2.98% African American, 0.33% Native American, 2.69% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 8.10% from other races, and 3.79% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 20.11% of the population.

There were 11,250 households out of which 30.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.5% were married couples living together, 13.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.0% were non-families. 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.64 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the city the age distribution of the population shows 22.4% under the age of 18, 9.6% from 18 to 24, 33.2% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $42,748, and the median income for a family was $51,654. Males had a median income of $35,987 versus $26,896 for females. The per capita income for the city was $19,530. About 6.4% of families and 7.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.1% of those under age 18 and 8.1% of those age 65 or over.

As of the 2000 Census, an adjusted 22.9% of Garfield's population reported Polish ancestry, ranked third highest in New Jersey behind Manville (23.1%) and Wallington (45.5%).

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 49.24 miles (79.24 km) of roadways, of which 42.67 miles (68.67 km) were maintained by the municipality, 6.44 miles (10.36 km) by Bergen County and 0.13 miles (0.21 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

U.S. Route 46 and County Route 507 pass through Garfield. Other main roads include Midland Avenue, Outwater Lane, River Drive and Passaic Street. There are five crossings of the Lower Passaic River.

Public transportation

Both the Garfield station and the Plauderville station, located on the Saddle Brook border, are served by NJ Transit's Bergen County Line, providing service to Hoboken Terminal, with transfers available at Secaucus Junction to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and to most of New Jersey Transit's other train lines.

New Jersey Transit buses includes lines 160 and 161 serving the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan, and local service on the 702, 707, 709 and 758 routes.

Images for kids


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