Gloucester City, New Jersey facts for kids

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Gloucester City, New Jersey
City
City of Gloucester City
Walt Whitman Bridge
Walt Whitman Bridge
Gloucester City highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Gloucester City highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Gloucester City, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Gloucester City, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Camden
Settled 1627 (Fort Nassau)
Incorporated February 25, 1868
Named for Gloucester, England
Area
 • Total 2.782 sq mi (7.206 km2)
 • Land 2.320 sq mi (6.009 km2)
 • Water 0.462 sq mi (1.197 km2)  16.62%
Area rank 354th of 566 in state
15th of 37 in county
Elevation 23 ft (7 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 11,456
 • Estimate (2015) 11,329
 • Rank 213th of 566 in state
12th of 37 in county
 • Density 4,937.8/sq mi (1,906.5/km2)
 • Density rank 112th of 566 in state
10th of 37 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 08030
Area code(s) 856 exchanges: 456, 742
FIPS code 34007268200
GNIS feature ID 0885234
Website www.cityofgloucester.org

Gloucester City is a city in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the city's population was 11,456, reflecting a decline of 28 (-0.2%) from the 11,484 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 1,165 (-9.2%) from the 12,649 counted in the 1990 Census. It is located directly across the Delaware River from Philadelphia and the Port of Philadelphia.

Gloucester City was incorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 25, 1868, from the remaining portions of Union Township, which was then dissolved. Additional territory was annexed in 1925 from Centre Township and in 1927 from Haddon Township. The city's name derives from Gloucester, England.

Gloucester City is known for its Irish American population, which was ninth-highest in the United States by percentage in the 2000 Census.

History

Kartskiss över Nya Sverige
New Sweden ca. 1650.

The name Fort Nassau was used by the Dutch in the 17th century for several fortifications, mostly trading stations, named for the House of Orange-Nassau. The one built in the 1620s at today's Gloucester City was for trade, mostly in beaver pelts, with the indigenous population of Susquehannock and Lenape. The region along the Delaware River and its bay was called the Zuyd Rivier and marked the southern flank of the province of New Netherland.

From 1638-1655 the area was part of New Sweden, which had been established by Peter Minuit, who had been Director of New Netherland, and was responsible for the famous purchase of the island of Manhattan. The location was disadvantageous since the richest fur-trapping area was on the west side of the river, where Swedish could intercept trade with the natives. In 1651, Peter Stuyvesant, director-general of New Netherland, dismantled the structure and relocated to a position on the other side of the river, in part to menace the Swedish, calling it Fort Casimir.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 2.782 square miles (7.206 km2), including 2.320 square miles (6.009 km2) of land and 0.462 square miles (1.197 km2) of water (16.62%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the city include Cloversdale, Gloucester Heights, Highland Park and Newbold.

The city borders Bellmawr, Brooklawn, Camden, Haddon Township, and Mount Ephraim. Gloucester City also borders Westville in Gloucester County and the city of Philadelphia in Pennsylvania, across the Delaware River.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 3,682
1880 5,347 45.2%
1890 6,564 22.8%
1900 6,840 4.2%
1910 9,462 38.3%
1920 12,162 28.5%
1930 13,796 13.4%
1940 13,692 −0.8%
1950 14,357 4.9%
1960 15,511 8.0%
1970 14,707 −5.2%
1980 13,121 −10.8%
1990 12,649 −3.6%
2000 11,484 −9.2%
2010 11,456 −0.2%
Est. 2015 11,329 −1.1%
Population sources: 1870-2000
1870-1920 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1870-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 11,456 people, 4,248 households, and 2,804 families residing in the city. The population density was 4,937.8 per square mile (1,906.5/km2). There were 4,712 housing units at an average density of 2,031.0 per square mile (784.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the city was 90.52% (10,370) White, 3.07% (352) Black or African American, 0.14% (16) Native American, 2.68% (307) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.82% (209) from other races, and 1.76% (202) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.70% (767) of the population.

There were 4,248 households out of which 29.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.3% were married couples living together, 15.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 34.0% were non-families. 27.4% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.70 and the average family size was 3.31.

In the city, the population was spread out with 24.5% under the age of 18, 9.3% from 18 to 24, 26.4% from 25 to 44, 26.9% from 45 to 64, and 12.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.7 years. For every 100 females there were 97.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 94.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $52,222 (with a margin of error of +/- $8,589) and the median family income was $58,825 (+/- $7,975). Males had a median income of $49,032 (+/- $3,038) versus $36,560 (+/- $2,335) for females. The per capita income for the city was $22,718 (+/- $1,341). About 12.2% of families and 14.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.2% of those under age 18 and 8.8% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 11,484 people, 4,213 households, and 2,839 families residing in the city. The population density was 5,213.7 people per square mile (2,015.5/km2). There were 4,604 housing units at an average density of 2,090.2 per square mile (808.0/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 97.14% White, 0.69% African American, 0.18% Native American, 0.68% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.64% from other races, and 0.64% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.88% of the population.

As of the 2000 Census, 34.2% of Gloucester City residents were of Irish ancestry, the ninth-highest percentage of any municipality in the United States, and third-highest in New Jersey, among all places with more than 1,000 residents identifying their ancestry.

There were 4,213 households out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 46.8% were married couples living together, 14.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.6% were non-families. 27.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 13.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.32.

In the city the population was spread out with 26.5% under the age of 18, 9.0% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 21.5% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 95.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 92.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $36,855, and the median income for a family was $46,038. Males had a median income of $35,659 versus $24,907 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,912. About 7.7% of families and 10.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 10.7% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 39.97 miles (64.33 km) of roadways, of which 29.52 miles (47.51 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.10 miles (11.43 km) by Camden County, 2.63 miles (4.23 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 0.72 miles (1.16 km) by the Delaware River Port Authority.

Interstate 76 travels through Gloucester City, passes into Camden and re-enters the city where it reaches its northern terminus.

The Walt Whitman Bridge is a suspension bridge carrying Interstate 76, spanning the Delaware River, connecting Philadelphia and Gloucester City. The bridge, which extends for almost 12,000 feet (3,700 m) between abutments, opened to traffic on May 16, 1957. U.S. Route 130 also travels through Gloucester City.

Public transportation

NJ Transit bus service is available to Philadelphia on routes 401 (from Salem), 402 (from Pennsville), 408 (from Millville), 410 (from Bridgeton) and 412 (from Swell), with local service on the 457 route between the Moorestown Mall and Camden.

The city is a planned stop on the Glassboro–Camden Line, an 18-mile (28.97 km) diesel multiple unit (DMU) light rail system projected for completion in 2019.

Popular culture

  • Gloucester City is cited by some as the birthplace of rock and roll. Bill Haley & His Comets — originally a country music band called "Bill Haley and the Saddlemen" — were the house band playing at the Twin Bar for 18 months starting in the early 1950s and are said to have modified their performing style while on stage there to an early form of rock and roll.
  • In 1881, painter Thomas Eakins completed two versions of "Shad-Fishing at Gloucester on the Delaware River". A watercolor version is housed in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, while an oil on canvas version is on display at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in Philadelphia, just across the Delaware River from Gloucester City.
  • On November 4, 1773, Elizabeth Griscom married John Ross at Huggs Tavern. Better known as Betsy Ross, Elizabeth is credited with designing and producing the first American flag. Huggs Tavern was torn down in the 1920s; the former site of the tavern is part of what is now Proprietor's Park.
  • Parts of the 1988 movie Clean and Sober – starring Michael Keaton – were shot in Gloucester City. The film prominently features the property at 215 Morris Street, which acts as the home of characters played by Kathy Baker and Luca Bercovici.
Preceded by
Camden
Bordering communities
of Philadelphia

Succeeded by
Brooklawn

Gloucester City, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.