Hendersonville, Tennessee facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Hendersonville, Tennessee
Satellite City
Flag of Hendersonville, Tennessee
Flag
Motto: "The City by the Lake"
Location of Hendersonville, Tennessee
Location of Hendersonville, Tennessee
Country United States
State Tennessee
County Sumner
Settled 1784
Incorporated 1901
Named for William Henderson (early settler)
Area
 • Total 31.37 sq mi (85.2 km2)
 • Land 27.3 sq mi (70.8 km2)
 • Water 5.6 sq mi (14.4 km2)
Elevation 482 ft (147 m)
Population (2013)Estimate
 • Total 54,068
 • Density 1,637.6/sq mi (573.9/km2)
Time zone Central (CST) (UTC-6)
 • Summer (DST) CDT (UTC-5)
ZIP codes 37075, 37077
Area code(s) 615
FIPS code 47-33280
GNIS feature ID 1287389
Website http://www.hvilletn.org

Hendersonville is the largest city in Sumner County, Tennessee, on Old Hickory Lake. The population was 51,372 at the 2010 census and 54,068 according 2013 estimates. Hendersonville is the fourth-largest city in the Nashville metropolitan area after Nashville, Murfreesboro, and Franklin and the 11th largest in Tennessee. Hendersonville is located 18 miles northeast of downtown Nashville. The city was settled around 1784 by Daniel Smith, and is named for William Henderson.

Hendersonville has been home to numerous musicians of the Nashville area, especially those of country music, most notably Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash, for whom the city's main road, Johnny Cash Parkway, was named for. Other notable past and present residents include Conway Twitty(whose home has been transformed into the Trinity Music City complex), Jean Shepard, Marty Stuart, Taylor Swift, Young Buck, and Chris Henderson (3 Doors Down).

History

Hendersonville was settled circa 1784 by Daniel Smith when he began work on Rock Castle. In 1790, William Henderson, for whom the area was named, settled in. With the monumental completion of the Old Hickory Dam in 1954, Hendersonville started to grow into the most populous city of Sumner County and one of the most populous suburbs of Nashville, along with Franklin and Murfreesboro. The city of roughly 250 was incorporated in 1969 under the leadership of L.H. "Dink" Newman, and over the next decades has been one of Tennessee's fastest-growing cities. The city contains around 0.7% of the population of Tennessee. During the Civil War, Monthaven, a historic home on the National Historic Register, was used as a field hospital.

Government

Hendersonville is governed by a board of 12 aldermen and a mayor, known as The Board of Mayor and Aldermen (BOMA). The aldermen are elected for staggered terms of four years by district. The mayor is elected once every four years by the whole city.

Flood scare

In 2007 a risk was identified that the trouble-prone Wolf Creek Dam in the neighboring state of Kentucky might break, which could have resulted in a complete inundation for the lower lying parts of Hendersonville. Since then extensive repairs have been performed on the dam, and the maximum level of water behind it has been lowered, thus reducing the pressure of water on the structure and resolving the identified flood risk.

Geography

Hendersonville is located at 36°18′00″N 86°36′22″W / 36.300084°N 86.606109°W / 36.300084; -86.606109 (36.300084, -86.606109).

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 32.9 square miles (85 km2), of which 27.3 square miles (71 km2) is land and 5.6 square miles (15 km2) (16.93%) is water.

Climate

Hendersonville has a humid subtropical climate.

Climate data for Hendersonville, TN
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 78
(25.6)
84
(28.9)
89
(31.7)
91
(32.8)
96
(35.6)
106
(41.1)
107
(41.7)
106
(41.1)
105
(40.6)
94
(34.4)
85
(29.4)
79
(26.1)
107
(41.7)
Average high °F (°C) 46
(7.8)
52
(11.1)
61
(16.1)
70
(21.1)
77
(25)
85
(29.4)
89
(31.7)
88
(31.1)
82
(27.8)
71
(21.7)
59
(15)
49
(9.4)
69
(20.6)
Average low °F (°C) 28
(-2.2)
31
(-0.6)
39
(3.9)
47
(8.3)
57
(13.9)
65
(18.3)
70
(21.1)
68
(20)
61
(16.1)
49
(9.4)
40
(4.4)
32
(0)
49
(9.4)
Record low °F (°C) −17
(-27.2)
−13
(-25)
2
(-16.7)
23
(-5)
34
(1.1)
42
(5.6)
51
(10.6)
47
(8.3)
36
(2.2)
26
(-3.3)
−1
(-18.3)
−10
(-23.3)
−17
(-27.2)
Precipitation inches (mm) 3.97
(100.8)
3.69
(93.7)
4.87
(123.7)
3.93
(99.8)
5.07
(128.8)
4.08
(103.6)
3.77
(95.8)
3.28
(83.3)
3.59
(91.2)
2.87
(72.9)
4.45
(113)
4.54
(115.3)
48.11
(1,222)
Snowfall inches (cm) 3.90
(9.91)
3.40
(8.64)
1.10
(2.79)
0.10
(0.25)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0
(0)
0.10
(0.25)
0.50
(1.27)
9.10
(23.11)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 170
1890 215 26.5%
1970 412
1980 26,561 6,346.8%
1990 32,188 21.2%
2000 40,620 26.2%
2010 51,372 26.5%
Est. 2015 56,018 9.0%
Sources:

As of the census of 2000, there were 40,620 people, 15,823 households, and 11,566 families residing in the city. The population density was 1,486.4 people per square mile (573.9/km2). There were 16,507 housing units at an average density of 604.0 per square mile (233.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 92.93% White, 4.12% African American, 0.27% Native American, 1.10% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.65% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.71% of the population.

There were 15,823 households out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.3% were married couples living together, 10.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.9% were non-families. 22.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.55 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the city, the population was spread out with 25.8% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 10.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.3 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $50,108, and the median income for a family was $57,625. Males had a median income of $40,823 versus $27,771 for females. The per capita income for the city was $24,165. About 5.2% of families and 6.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.2% of those under age 18 and 7.7% of those age 65 or over.

Arts

Hendersonville Arts Council, is a non-profit organization and housed in Monthaven Mansion (built before the Civil War and used as a hospital during several battles, where entertaining paranormal activity is now alleged to occur frequently. It is also on the National Register of Historic Places, the Tennessee Civil War Trail and Ring of Fire) and exhibits visual art, music, workshops, wine tastings, crafts, culinary demonstrations, performances, and cultural activities. They produce a long running summer concert series and are open daily for self-guided tours.

Hendersonville Performing Arts Center, is a non-profit theater (formerly known as Steeple Players Theatre). HPAC has presented theater productions since 1996. Since 2003, it has been located in the City Square Shopping Center.

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