Jefferson Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Jefferson Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Jefferson
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Jefferson Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Jefferson Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated February 11, 1804
Named for Thomas Jefferson
Area
 • Total 43.108 sq mi (111.651 km2)
 • Land 39.132 sq mi (101.353 km2)
 • Water 3.976 sq mi (10.298 km2)  9.22%
Area rank 47th of 566 in state
3rd of 39 in county
Elevation 1,142 ft (348 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 21,314
 • Estimate (2015) 21,494
 • Rank 122nd of 566 in state
8th of 39 in county
 • Density 544.7/sq mi (210.3/km2)
 • Density rank 439th of 566 in state
34th of 39 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07435 - Newfoundland
07438 - Oak Ridge
07849 - Lake Hopatcong
07885 - Wharton
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3402734980
GNIS feature ID 0882210
Website www.jeffersontownship.net

Jefferson Township is the northernmost township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 21,314, having increased by 1,597 (+8.1%) from the 19,717 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,892 (+10.6%) from the 17,825 counted in the 1990 Census.

Jefferson Township was formed as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 11, 1804, from portions of Pequannock Township and Roxbury Township. The township was named after Thomas Jefferson, the President of the United States at the time the Township was created.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 43.108 square miles (111.651 km2), including 39.132 square miles (101.353 km2) of land and 3.976 square miles (10.298 km2) of water (9.22%).

The township borders Mount Arlington, Rockaway Township, Roxbury Township and Wharton in Morris County; West Milford Township in Passaic County; and Hardyston Township, Hopatcong and Sparta Township in Sussex County.

The township has two large divisions, Milton and Lake Hopatcong. Each half has its own first-aid squad, fire department substation and set of elementary schools. Addresses in the Milton section of the township are classified under the Oak Ridge mailing city, which is shared with a portion of West Milford Township, or in the Newfoundland mailing area, shared with a portion of West Milford and Rockaway Township. Addresses in Lake Hopatcong use either Lake Hopatcong (not to be confused with the Hopatcong mailing city used in the Borough of Hopatcong) or Wharton as their mailing city. As of 2016, there is a push to remove all or part of the Wharton mailing address designation and change it to the Lake Hopatcong mailing address. The Jefferson Township Municipal Building, Middle School, High School, Recycling Center and school bus depot are positioned at the boundary between the two halves of the township.

Lake Swannanoa is an unincorporated community located within Jefferson Township.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Berkshire Valley, Bowling Green Mountain, Cozy Lake, Espanong, Ford, Halsey Island, Hopatcong Station, Hopewell, Hurdtown, Lake Hopatcong, Longwood Mountains, Lower Longwood, Minisink, Moosepac Pond, New Russia, Newfoundland, Nolans Point, Oak Ridge, Petersburg, Prospect Point, Raccoon Island, Russia, Tierneys Corner, Upper Longwood, Weldon, Woodport and Woodstock.

Portions of the township are owned by the City of Newark, Essex County, for its Pequannock River Watershed, which provides water to the city from an area of 35,000 acres (14,000 ha) that also includes portions of Hardyston Township, Kinnelon, Rockaway Township, Vernon Township and West Milford.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,281
1820 1,231 −3.9%
1830 1,551 26.0%
1840 1,412 −9.0%
1850 1,358 −3.8%
1860 1,471 8.3%
1870 1,430 −2.8%
1880 1,792 25.3%
1890 1,611 −10.1%
1900 1,341 −16.8%
1910 1,303 −2.8%
1920 1,226 −5.9%
1930 1,254 2.3%
1940 1,548 23.4%
1950 2,744 77.3%
1960 6,884 150.9%
1970 14,122 105.1%
1980 16,413 16.2%
1990 17,825 8.6%
2000 19,717 10.6%
2010 21,314 8.1%
Est. 2015 21,494 0.8%
Population sources:
1810-1920 1840
1850-1870 1850
1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1900-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 21,314 people, 7,830 households, and 5,794 families residing in the township. The population density was 544.7 per square mile (210.3/km2). There were 8,597 housing units at an average density of 219.7 per square mile (84.8/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 90.64% (19,318) White, 1.56% (332) Black or African American, 0.08% (18) Native American, 4.60% (981) Asian, 0.02% (4) Pacific Islander, 1.49% (317) from other races, and 1.61% (344) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.48% (1,382) of the population.

There were 7,830 households out of which 35.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.0% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.0% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.19.

In the township, the population was spread out with 24.6% under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 31.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.9 years. For every 100 females there were 100.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 98.3 males. The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $92,095 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,923) and the median family income was $102,324 (+/- $6,788). Males had a median income of $73,152 (+/- $3,827) versus $51,933 (+/- $2,776) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,912 (+/- $1,795). About 2.6% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.2% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 19,717 people, 7,131 households, and 5,448 families residing in the township. The population density was 485.3 people per square mile (187.4/km²). There were 7,527 housing units at an average density of 185.2 per square mile (71.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.14% White, 0.83% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.07% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.62% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.41% of the population.

As of the 2000 Census, 25.7% of residents identified their ancestry as Italian, 22.9% Irish, 21.7% German, 11.6% English and 10.0% Polish.

There were 7,131 households out of which 38.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.5% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.6% were non-families. 18.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the township the age distribution of the population shows 26.9% under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 33.8% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 8.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 98.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.8 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $68,837, and the median income for a family was $76,974. Males had a median income of $51,359 versus $37,849 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,950. About 1.0% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.2% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.

Arts and culture

Train Station at Newfoundland, New Jersey
Newfoundland Train Station

Every year, the weekend following Independence Day, The Jefferson Arts Committee hosts a day of celebration known as Jefferson Township Day (it is colloquially referred to as "Jefferson Day"). Throughout the entire day, entertainment and festivities at the Jefferson Township High School are provided. Up until 2012 there would be a morning parade featuring the town's fire trucks, high school marching band and other local groups march down Weldon Road. Starting in 2013 the parade has been substituted with various activities such as a fishing contest, kids kart race and a road bowling tournament. There are a variety of activities set up on the Jefferson Township High School grounds for participants of Jefferson Day, including children's games, food and craft vendors, and performances at two stages. At night, the Jefferson Township Community Band, directed by Peter Tummillo Jr., performs before the display of fireworks. Township resident Bill Child wrote an original song back in September 2006, "My Sweet Home Jefferson", that has been sung at many of the recent Jefferson Day celebrations.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 133.62 miles (215.04 km) of roadways, of which 112.52 miles (181.08 km) were maintained by the municipality, 12.77 miles (20.55 km) by Morris County and 8.33 miles (13.41 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

A few major roads pass through Jefferson. Green Pond Road, officially CR 513, is the only major county road that passes through for a short stretch in the northeast section. State routes include Route 15 (part of the "Sparta Bypass") in the southwest, Route 23 in the northeast (as it crises-crosses along the Passaic county line) and Route 181 in the southwest.

Interstate 80 also passes through very briefly in the southern tip without any interchanges; the closest exits are 33 and 34 in neighboring Wharton.

Public transportation

NJ Transit had provided local bus service on the 967 and MCM7 routes, which was terminated in 2010 after subsidies to local route operators were eliminated as part of budget cuts.

Lakeland Bus Lines provides service along Interstate 80 operating between Newton and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.


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