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Lee County, Alabama
Map
Map of Alabama highlighting Lee County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the USA highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
Statistics
Founded December 5, 1866; 153 years ago (1866-12-05)
Seat Opelika
Largest City Auburn
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

616 sq mi (1,595 km²)
608 sq mi (1,575 km²)
8.3 sq mi (21 km²), 1.3%
PopulationEst.
 - (2015)
 - Density

156,993
254/sq mi (98/km²)
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website: www.leeco.us
Named for: General Robert E. Lee
 
  • County Number 43 on Alabama Licence Plates

Lee County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census the population was 140,247. The county seat is Opelika, and the largest city is Auburn. The county is named for General Robert E. Lee (1807–1870), who served as General in Chief of the Armies of the Confederate States in 1865. Lee County comprises the Auburn-Opelika, AL Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is included in the Columbus-Auburn-Opelika, GA-AL Combined Statistical Area.

History

Lee County was established by the State Legislature on December 5, 1866, out of parts of Macon, Tallapoosa, Chambers, and Russell counties. In an election to determine the county seat, Opelika was chosen over Auburn and Salem. In 1923, Phenix City, located in the southeastern corner of Lee County, merged with the town of Girard, located in the northeastern corner of Russell County. To prevent the new town of Phenix City from straddling the Lee-Russell line, Lee County ceded to Russell County the 10 square miles (25.9 km2) in the southeastern corner surrounding Phenix City in exchange for 20 square miles (51.8 km2) in the northwest corner of Russell County surrounding the unincorporated community of Marvyn. This territory is what forms the southern "panhandle" of Lee County.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 616 square miles (1,600 km2), of which 608 square miles (1,570 km2) is land and 8.3 square miles (21 km2) (1.3%) is water.

Major highways

  • I-85 (AL).svg Interstate 85
  • US 29.svg U.S. Highway 29
  • US 280.svg U.S. Highway 280
  • US 431.svg U.S. Highway 431
  • Alabama 14.svg State Route 14
  • Alabama 51.svg State Route 51
  • Alabama 147.svg State Route 147
  • Alabama 169.svg State Route 169
  • Alabama 267.svg State Route 267

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1870 21,750
1880 27,262 25.3%
1890 28,694 5.3%
1900 31,826 10.9%
1910 32,867 3.3%
1920 32,821 −0.1%
1930 36,063 9.9%
1940 36,455 1.1%
1950 45,073 23.6%
1960 49,754 10.4%
1970 61,268 23.1%
1980 76,283 24.5%
1990 87,146 14.2%
2000 115,092 32.1%
2010 140,247 21.9%
Est. 2015 156,993 11.9%
U.S. Decennial Census
1790–1960 1900–1990
1990–2000 2010–2015

As of the census of 2000, there were 115,092 people, 45,702 households, and 27,284 families residing in the county. The population density was 189 people per square mile (73/km2). There were 50,329 housing units at an average density of 83 per square mile (32/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 74.07% White, 22.65% Black or African American, 0.24% Native American, 1.63% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.46% from other races, and 0.93% from two or more races. 1.43% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 45,702 households out of which 29.70% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.10% were married couples living together, 11.80% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.30% were non-families. 27.80% of all households were made up of individuals and 5.70% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.42 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the county, the population was spread out with 23.30% under the age of 18, 22.70% from 18 to 24, 28.10% from 25 to 44, 17.80% from 45 to 64, and 8.10% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28 years. For every 100 females there were 96.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.20 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,952, and the median income for a family was $46,781. Males had a median income of $33,598 versus $23,228 for females. The per capita income for the county was $17,158. About 11.10% of families and 21.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.30% of those under age 18 and 12.00% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 140,247 people, 55,682 households, and 33,692 families residing in the county. The population density was 227.7 people per square mile (87.9/km2). There were 62,391 housing units at an average density of 101.3 per square mile (39.1/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 71.3% White, 22.7% Black or African American, 0.3% Native American, 2.6% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 1.3% from other races, and 1.6% from two or more races. 3.3% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 55,682 households out of which 28.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 43.1% were married couples living together, 13.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 39.5% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.44 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the county, the population was spread out with 22.5% under the age of 18, 20.5% from 18 to 24, 26.1% from 25 to 44, 21.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 28.3 years. For every 100 females there were 97.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.0 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $40,894, and the median income for a family was $59,112. Males had a median income of $42,335 versus $31,766 for females. The per capita income for the county was $22,794. About 11.0% of families and 19.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.0% of those under age 18 and 9.0% of those age 65 or over.

Communities

Lee County AL Political Map
Lee-county-population-2010
Population distribution in Lee County by municipality, 2010

Cities

Towns

Unincorporated communities

Places of interest

Lee County is home to Chewacla State Park, the Jule Collins Smith Museum of Fine Art, Bean's Mill, the Salem-Shotwell Covered Bridge and the Grand National Golf course which is part of the Robert Trent Jones Golf Trail.

Gallery

Samford Hall at the Auburn University, 2008. 
Southern Union SCC's Opelika Campus, 2011. 
Opelika's Historic Railroad Avenue, 2011. 
Auburn University Regional Airport, 2007. 
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