Lower Alloways Creek Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Lower Alloways Creek Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Lower Alloways Creek
Hancock House in the Hancock's Bridge section of the township
Hancock House in the Hancock's Bridge section of the township
Motto: The Heart of South Jersey
Lower Alloways Creek Township highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Lower Alloways Creek Township highlighted in Salem County. Inset map: Salem County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lower Alloways Creek Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lower Alloways Creek Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Salem
Formed June 17, 1767
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Area
 • Total 72.455 sq mi (187.659 km2)
 • Land 45.230 sq mi (117.146 km2)
 • Water 27.225 sq mi (70.513 km2)  37.57%
Area rank 14th of 566 in state
1st of 15 in county
Elevation 3 ft (0.9 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 1,770
 • Estimate (2015) 1,713
 • Rank 501st of 566 in state
13th of 15 in county
 • Density 39.1/sq mi (15.1/km2)
 • Density rank 558th of 566 in state
15th of 15 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08038 - Hancock's Bridge
Area code(s) 856 exchanges: 339, 935
FIPS code 3403341640
GNIS feature ID 0882065
Website www.lowerallowayscreek-nj.gov

Lower Alloways Creek Township is a township in Salem County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 1,770, reflecting a decline of 81 (-4.4%) from the 1,851 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 7 (-0.4%) from the 1,858 counted in the 1990 Census.

PSE&G operates three nuclear reactors in Lower Alloways Creek Township. Salem 1 and Salem 2 are pressurized water reactors at the Salem Nuclear Power Plant and the Hope Creek Nuclear Generating Station has one boiling water reactor. Lower Alloways Creek Township is a dry town where alcohol cannot be sold.

History

Lower Alloways Creek Township was formed on June 17, 1767, when Alloways Creek Township was subdivided and Upper Alloways Creek Township (now Alloway Township) was also formed. The township was incorporated by the New Jersey Legislature's Township Act of 1798 on February 21, 1798, as one of New Jersey's original group of 104 townships. The name Alloway is derivative of Allowas, a local Native American chief.

Geography

Salem and Hope Creek Nuclear Reactors (7238282472)
The Hope Creek (left) and Salem (right) nuclear power plants as seen from the Delaware River

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 72.455 square miles (187.659 km2), including 45.230 square miles (117.146 km2) of land and 27.225 square miles (70.513 km2) of water (37.57%).

Hancock's Bridge (with a 2010 Census population of 254) is an unincorporated community and census-designated place (CDP) located within Lower Alloways Creek Township, and home to the township's municipal building, police station and a post office.

The township includes the great majority of Artificial Island, the northern tip of which is crossed east-westward by the New Jersey-Delaware state line, so it borders a tiny portion of New Castle County, Delaware, which is one of two areas of land of Delaware (and New Castle County) that is east of the Delaware River, the other being Finns Point, also part of New Castle County, DE, adjacent to Pennsville Township.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Alder Cove, Arnold Point, Canton, Cumberland, Harmersville, Haskells Mills, Maskellers Mill, New Bridge and Woods Landing.

The township borders the Salem County municipalities of Elsinboro Township, Quinton Township and Salem. Lower Alloways Creek Township also borders the Delaware Bay, Cumberland County and a small point of land that is located within Delaware's Twelve-Mile Circle.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,182
1820 1,217 3.0%
1830 1,223 0.5%
1840 1,252 2.4%
1850 1,423 13.7%
1860 1,471 3.4%
1870 1,483 0.8%
1880 1,373 −7.4%
1890 1,308 −4.7%
1900 1,242 −5.0%
1910 1,252 0.8%
1920 1,084 −13.4%
1930 1,063 −1.9%
1940 1,124 5.7%
1950 1,307 16.3%
1960 1,293 −1.1%
1970 1,400 8.3%
1980 1,547 10.5%
1990 1,858 20.1%
2000 1,851 −0.4%
2010 1,770 −4.4%
Est. 2015 1,713 −3.2%
Population sources: 1810-2000
1810-1920 1840 1850-1870
1850 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 1,770 people, 679 households, and 503.1 families residing in the township. The population density was 39.1 per square mile (15.1/km2). There were 727 housing units at an average density of 16.1 per square mile (6.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 96.95% (1,716) White, 1.36% (24) Black or African American, 0.28% (5) Native American, 0.17% (3) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.11% (2) from other races, and 1.13% (20) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.53% (27) of the population.

There were 679 households out of which 27.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.2% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.9% were non-families. 20.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.03.

In the township, the population was spread out with 21.8% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 22.1% from 25 to 44, 31.0% from 45 to 64, and 17.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44.2 years. For every 100 females there were 96.0 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 94.7 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $66,384 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,808) and the median family income was $72,969 (+/- $7,867). Males had a median income of $46,964 (+/- $6,435) versus $43,083 (+/- $8,815) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $27,325 (+/- $2,057). about 0.0% of families and 1.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.0% of those under age 18 and 3.0% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 1,851 people, 693 households, and 537 families residing in the township. The population density was 39.6 people per square mile (15.3/km²). There were 730 housing units at an average density of 15.6 per square mile (6.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.38% White, 2.16% African American, 0.11% Native American, 0.65% Asian, 0.16% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.49% of the population.

There were 693 households out of which 31.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 66.7% were married couples living together, 7.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 22.4% were non-families. 18.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.9% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.67 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the township the population was spread out with 24.4% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 29.3% from 25 to 44, 26.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.2 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $55,078, and the median income for a family was $59,653. Males had a median income of $44,081 versus $30,313 for females. The per capita income for the township was $21,962. About 4.2% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.7% of those under age 18 and 3.1% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 49.78 miles (80.11 km) of roadways, of which 27.18 miles (43.74 km) were maintained by the municipality and 22.60 miles (36.37 km) by Salem County.

The only major roads that pass through are 600-series county routes.

Route 45 and Route 49 are accessible in neighboring municipalities. The closest limited access roads are two towns away which include Interstate 295 and the New Jersey Turnpike in Pennsville Township.


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