Lumberton Township, New Jersey facts for kids

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Lumberton Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Lumberton
Center of Lumberton
Center of Lumberton
Lumberton Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Lumberton Township highlighted in Burlington County. Inset map: Burlington County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lumberton Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lumberton Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Burlington
Incorporated March 14, 1860
Area
 • Total 13.056 sq mi (33.817 km2)
 • Land 12.924 sq mi (33.474 km2)
 • Water 0.132 sq mi (0.343 km2)  1.01%
Elevation 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 12,559
 • Estimate (2015) 12,428
 • Rank 193rd of 566 in state
11th of 40 in county
 • Density 971.7/sq mi (375.2/km2)
 • Density rank 386th of 566 in state
24th of 40 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08048
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3400542060
GNIS feature ID 0882091
Website www.lumbertontwp.com

Lumberton Township is a township in Burlington County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 12,559, reflecting an increase of 2,098 (+20.1%) from the 10,461 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,756 (+56.0%) from the 6,705 counted in the 1990 Census.

Lumberton was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 14, 1860, from portions of Medford Township, Southampton Township and Eastampton Township. Portions of the township were taken on March 12, 1924, to form Hainesport. The township was named for its early lumber industry, with pine trees cut down to supply wood used in Philadelphia.

In March 2007, Lumberton was identified as having the most active community of EBay buyers and sellers on a per-capita basis in the United States, with 46,000 items posted on the site over a three-week period by members based in the Lumberton ZIP code 08048.

History

The original 17th century farms in the township's southwest revolved around the unincorporated community of Fostertown. The farms had been formed following removal of forest. The village of Lumberton grew out of two bordering towns. Eayrestown, settled by Richard and Elizabeth Eayres in the late 1600s. Eayrestown was the first substantial settlement in this area and became the center for commerce because of its sawmill. The history of some of the homes in Lumberton date back to the times of slavery. Each generation of descendants removed from the first settlers differed in opinion about slavery. The spectrum changed from advocacy and tolerance, to passive and active resistance. Many locals began to advocate for its abolition in New Jersey then nationwide. One home, still located on Creek Road in the township, has been documented as having been a site on the underground railroad. The home was originally built in 1824 by D.B. Cole, a descendant of the founders of old Colestown, New Jersey. The deed to the land where the home sits dates back to 1806 when the Coles purchased the land from the Moores of Moorestown. The story goes, and has been documented Charles Blockson's Hippocrene Guide to the Underground Railroad, that a fake well that once rested in the backyard of the house served as a chute for slaves to slide down in order to hide from their slavemasters as they fled to Canada. The town was also a site for Project Nike during the Cold War. In the event of a nuclear war, Nike Ajax and Hercules missiles were to be launched from bases in Lumberton and other neighboring bases in order to prevent the Soviet Union from bombing greater Philadelphia.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 13.056 square miles (33.817 km2), including 12.924 square miles (33.474 km2) of land and 0.132 square miles (0.343 km2) of water (1.01%).

The township borders Eastampton Township, Southampton Township, Medford Township, Mount Laurel Township, Hainesport Township, and Mount Holly Township.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Brown, Eayrestown, Fostertown and Newbolds Corner.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 1,830
1870 1,718 −6.1%
1880 1,689 −1.7%
1890 1,799 6.5%
1900 1,624 −9.7%
1910 1,768 8.9%
1920 1,571 −11.1%
1930 905 * −42.4%
1940 1,007 11.3%
1950 1,325 31.6%
1960 2,833 113.8%
1970 3,945 39.3%
1980 5,236 32.7%
1990 6,705 28.1%
2000 10,461 56.0%
2010 12,559 20.1%
Est. 2015 12,428 −1.0%
Population sources:
1860-2000 1860-1920
1860-1870 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 12,559 people, 4,540 households, and 3,237 families residing in the township. The population density was 971.7 per square mile (375.2/km2). There were 4,719 housing units at an average density of 365.1 per square mile (141.0/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 70.99% (8,916) White, 18.93% (2,378) Black or African American, 0.24% (30) Native American, 4.71% (591) Asian, 0.04% (5) Pacific Islander, 1.55% (195) from other races, and 3.54% (444) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.86% (736) of the population.

There were 4,540 households out of which 38.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.2% were married couples living together, 11.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.7% were non-families. 24.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 9.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.28.

In the township, the population was spread out with 27.4% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 25.6% from 25 to 44, 28.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.5 years. For every 100 females there were 92.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $82,250 (with a margin of error of +/- $10,344) and the median family income was $102,276 (+/- $7,854). Males had a median income of $71,475 (+/- $6,369) versus $54,452 (+/- $5,969) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $35,294 (+/- $1,882). About 5.6% of families and 5.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.3% of those under age 18 and 1.3% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 10,461 people, 3,930 households, and 2,731 families residing in the township. The population density was 813.0 people per square mile (313.8/km²). There were 4,080 housing units at an average density of 317.1 per square mile (122.4/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 78.31% White, 13.75% African American, 0.23% Native American, 3.38% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 1.90% from other races, and 2.41% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.15% of the population.

There were 3,930 households out of which 39.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.9% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.5% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.61 and the average family size was 3.17.

In the township the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 6.2% from 18 to 24, 35.6% from 25 to 44, 19.0% from 45 to 64, and 11.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 91.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.6 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $60,571, and the median income for a family was $70,329. Males had a median income of $46,045 versus $32,431 for females. The per capita income for the township was $25,789. About 2.6% of families and 3.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.2% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of July 2015, the township had a total of 64.82 miles (104.32 km) of roadways, of which 45.61 miles (73.40 km) were maintained by the municipality, 17.11 miles (27.54 km) by Burlington County and 2.10 miles (3.38 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service in the township on the 317 route between Asbury Park and Philadelphia, and on the 413 route between Camden and Burlington.

BurLink bus service is offered on the B1 route between Beverly and Pemberton.

The Flying W Airport is located 1-mile (1.6 km) southwest of the central business district.


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