Nutley, New Jersey facts for kids

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Nutley, New Jersey
Township
Township of Nutley
Nutley Memorial Parkway
Nutley Memorial Parkway
Location in Essex County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Essex County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Nutley, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Nutley, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Essex
Incorporated February 18, 1874 as Franklin Township
Reincorporated March 5, 1902 as Nutley
Area
 • Total 3.428 sq mi (8.878 km2)
 • Land 3.384 sq mi (8.764 km2)
 • Water 0.044 sq mi (0.114 km2)  1.28%
Area rank 316th of 566 in state
13th of 22 in county
Elevation 52 ft (16 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 28,370
 • Estimate (2015) 28,748
 • Rank 79th of 566 in state
10th of 22 in county
 • Density 8,384.1/sq mi (3,237.1/km2)
 • Density rank 43rd of 566 in state
7th of 22 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07110
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3401353680
GNIS feature ID 1729715
Website www.nutleynj.org

Nutley is a township in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 28,370, reflecting an increase of 1,008 (+3.7%) from the 27,362 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 263 (+1.0%) from the 27,099 counted in the 1990 Census.

What is now Nutley was originally incorporated as Franklin Township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 18, 1874, from portions of Belleville Township. Nutley was incorporated as a Town on March 5, 1902, replacing Franklin Township. In 1981, the town was one of seven Essex County municipalities to pass a referendum to become a township, joining four municipalities that had already made the change, of what would ultimately be more than a dozen Essex County municipalities to reclassify themselves as townships in order take advantage of federal revenue sharing policies that allocated townships a greater share of government aid to municipalities on a per capita basis.

Nutley derived its name from the estate of the Satterthwaite family, established in 1844, which stretched along the Passaic River and from an artist's colony in the area.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Nutley as its 38th best place to live in its 2008 rankings of the "Best Places To Live" in New Jersey.

History

Nutleysta
Former railroad station at Franklin Avenue
The Amateur Circus at Nutley by Peter Newall 1894
Annie Oakley performing at an amateur circus at Nutley in 1894, to raise funds for the Red Cross

Nutley grew slowly as Newark developed. The first European settler in the area, recorded in the minutes of a Newark town meeting in 1693, was a Dutch painter named Bastian Van Giesen. His house, known as Vreeland Homestead, still stands today on Chestnut Street and is the location of the Nutley Women's Club. John Treat and Thomas Stagg purchased lots adjacent to Van Geisen's in 1695 and 1698 respectively. The Van Riper House is another building from the era.

The first brownstone quarry in Nutley is believed to have been in operation by the early 18th century and was the town's first major industry. Jobs at the brownstone quarry in the Avondale section of Nutley provided work for many Italian and Irish immigrants. Mills situated along the Third River in the area now known as Memorial Park I became Nutley's second major industry.

John and Thomas Speer, Joseph Kingsland, and Henry Duncan all operated mills in the town during the 1800s. Current streets in Nutley are named after these mill owners. Henry Duncan built several mills throughout the town and established the village of Franklinville consisting of 30 homes and a few small businesses which later became the center of Nutley. One of Duncan's buildings has been modified and now serves as the town hall. Kingsland Manor is a national historic place.

During the late 1880s, painter Frank Fowler founded an artists' colony on The Enclosure, a dead-end street that is near the Third River, a stream that runs through the town's parks. Later artist residents of the street included Frederick Dana Marsh, Reginald Marsh and muralist Michael Lenson. Gary T. Erbe, a Trompe-l'œil painter, currently resides there.

Nutley's current town historian, John Demmer, is the author of the book in the "Images of America" series titled Nutley; Demmer is also part of The Nutley Historical Society, a not-for-profit organization dedicated to serve the educational, cultural and historical needs of the community. The Nutley Historical Society manages the operation of The Nutley Historical Museum, housed in a former town schoolhouse at 65 Church Street.

Several other historical works on Nutley have been written by local historians, notably the late Ann Troy's Nutley: Yesterday - Today; "Nutley" by Marilyn Peters and Richard O'Connor in the "Then and Now" series; and books about the Nutley Velodrome. Local resident Chris Economaki wrote extensively about the Nutley Velodrome in his autobiographical racing history Let Them All Go! as the Velodrome was the first racetrack he had visited as a child.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 3.428 square miles (8.878 km2), including 3.384 square miles (8.764 km2) of land and 0.044 square miles (0.114 km2) of water (1.28%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Avondale, Franklin, Glendale and Younticaw.

The township borders Belleville and Bloomfield in Essex County; Lyndhurst in Bergen County; and Clifton in Passaic County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 1,617
1890 2,007 24.1%
1900 3,682 83.5%
1910 6,009 63.2%
1920 9,421 56.8%
1930 20,572 118.4%
1940 21,954 6.7%
1950 26,992 22.9%
1960 29,513 9.3%
1970 31,913 8.1%
1980 28,998 −9.1%
1990 27,099 −6.5%
2000 27,362 1.0%
2010 28,370 3.7%
Est. 2015 28,748 1.3%
Population sources:
1880-1920 1880-1890
1890-1900 1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 28,370 people, 11,314 households, and 7,660 families residing in the township. The population density was 8,384.1 per square mile (3,237.1/km2). There were 11,789 housing units at an average density of 3,484.0 per square mile (1,345.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 82.50% (23,405) White, 2.21% (628) Black or African American, 0.13% (36) Native American, 9.95% (2,824) Asian, 0.01% (4) Pacific Islander, 2.97% (842) from other races, and 2.22% (631) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 11.82% (3,354) of the population.

There were 11,314 households out of which 29.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.8% were married couples living together, 11.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.3% were non-families. 27.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.50 and the average family size was 3.10.

In the township, the population was spread out with 20.7% under the age of 18, 7.3% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 28.9% from 45 to 64, and 14.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.7 years. For every 100 females there were 88.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 86.0 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $76,167 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,896) and the median family income was $98,042 (+/- $4,394). Males had a median income of $64,736 (+/- $4,840) versus $52,410 (+/- $3,558) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,706 (+/- $1,918). About 3.1% of families and 4.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.9% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census, there were 27,362 people, 10,884 households, and 7,368 families residing in the township. The population density was 8,123.0 people per square mile (3,134.9/km2). There were 11,118 housing units at an average density of 1, 273.8/km2 (3,300.6/sq mi). The racial makeup of the township was 87.95% White, 1.87% African American, 0.05% Native American, 7.10% Asian, 0.04% Pacific Islander, 1.75% from other races, and 1.24% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 6.69% of the population.

As of the 2000 Census, 36.0% of town residents were of Italian ancestry, the 12th-highest percentage of any municipality in the United States, and fifth-highest in New Jersey, among all places with more than 1,000 residents identifying their ancestry.

There were 10,884 households out of which 29.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.0% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.3% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.51 and the average family size was 3.11.

In the town the population was spread out with 21.8% under the age of 18, 6.4% from 18 to 24, 31.6% from 25 to 44, 24.1% from 45 to 64, and 16.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 85.0 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $59,634, and the median income for a family was $73,264. Males had a median income of $51,121 versus $37,100 for females. The per capita income for the township was $28,039. About 3.4% of families and 4.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.4% of those under age 18 and 7.9% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

Nutley's parks include Booth Park, DeMuro Park, Father Glotzbach Park, Msgr Owens Park, Flora Louden Park, Kingsland Park, Memorial Park I, II, III, Nichols Park, and Rheinheimer Park. They offer fields for baseball, football, basketball, lacrosse, roller hockey, and soccer among other sports. The township hosts a weekly Market Walk and Talk beginning and ending at the township farmer's market where participants take a one-hour loop through the local scenic parks.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 67.94 miles (109.34 km) of roadways, of which 57.00 miles (91.73 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.71 miles (12.41 km) by Essex County and 2.45 miles (3.94 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 0.78 miles (1.26 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

The Garden State Parkway clips the southwest corner of the township, entering in the south from Bloomfield before reentering Bloomfield in the north. Route 21 follows the township's eastern border.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service between the township and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 192 route, to Newark on the 13, 27, 72 and 74 routes, with local service on the 709 route.

Until 1966, the Newark Branch of the Erie-Lackawanna Railroad served the township.

Operation Nutley Cares

After Hurricane Katrina devastated the central gulf coast region on August 29, 2005, Mayor Joanne Cocchiola and Commissioner Carmen A. Orechio reached out to local residents who wanted to help victims of the devastation, and formed the Operation Nutley Cares Committee. A decision was made to adopt Bay St. Louis, Mississippi as a sister city, Bay St. Louis, population 8,500, which sits just northeast of New Orleans, and had at least 60% of the community completely destroyed by Katrina and another 20% condemned. Monetary donations are still being accepted to help fund efforts to assist Bay St. Louis.

Cultural references

  • Aerosmith played at the Nutley prom in the 1960s.
  • George Dorn, in The Illuminatus! Trilogy, is described as having grown up in Nutley, with references to his childhood illustrating that the authors had more than a passing familiarity with the town.
  • Antiwar activist and Quaker Carl Hinke became the last American arrested for the Vietnam War draft Opposition to the Vietnam War on December 12, 1976. He had moved to Canada due to his pacifist convictions after being offered a one-way ticket to North Vietnam by Nutley's American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars chapters. Hinke was pardoned by Jimmy Carter on January 21, 1977, in his first official act as president.
  • Weird NJ runs regular features on past and present Nutley destinations such as Franklin Avenue beat coffee house, Angelo Nardi's Villa Capri which town council tried to close for decades and various Nutley "old man" bars such as the Old Canal Inn Nutley was also used as a shooting location for the 1999 film Weird N.J.
  • The courtroom in NBC's television show Ed was an exact replica of Nutley's municipal courtroom, and various locations in the township were used during filming, including the outside of the Public Safety building.
  • The short-lived Fox television show Quintuplets was set in Nutley.
  • Celebrity homemaker Martha Stewart, has shared her childhood memories of Nutley on her television shows, and had a "Nutley Day" on her talk show Martha, in 2006.
  • Nutley was referenced in the Futurama episode #210 "Put Your Head on My Shoulders" as the destination of the bus stop where Bender found all of the undesirable Valentine's Day dates for his dating service customers ("Can't hon', I gotta catch my bus back to Nutley.", "Excuse me, did you say '10:15 to Nutley'?" and "Anybody else for Nutley?"), in "The Beast with a Billion Backs" ("This place makes Nutley look like crap.") and in "Into the Wild Green Yonder" ("Beats Nutley on a Saturday night.")
  • Nutley was frequently mentioned and featured in HBO's hit series The Sopranos, and Soprano family associate Furio Giunta purchased a home in Nutley.
  • Nutley was also referenced by Archie Bunker a number of times on the TV show All in the Family (it's where Edith's family is from)--as in "I don't want to take the bus all way to Nutley, NJ to see your ......Family", spoken in the Archie Bunker whine.
  • ECW wrestler Balls Mahoney was billed as being from Nutley.
  • In the 2012 film, People Like Us, starring Michelle Pfeiffer and Chris Pine, Pfeiffer's character states that she is from Nutley, New Jersey.

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