Lyndhurst, New Jersey facts for kids

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Lyndhurst, New Jersey
Township
Township of Lyndhurst
Lyndhurst portion of New Jersey Meadowlands.
Lyndhurst portion of New Jersey Meadowlands.
Nickname(s): "Bear Country"
Map highlighting Lyndhurst's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Map highlighting Lyndhurst's location within Bergen County. Inset: Bergen County's location within New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lyndhurst, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lyndhurst, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Bergen
Incorporated February 19, 1852 (as Union Township)
Renamed May 15, 1917 (as Lyndhurst)
Named for Lord Lyndhurst
Area
 • Total 4.894 sq mi (12.676 km2)
 • Land 4.558 sq mi (11.806 km2)
 • Water 0.336 sq mi (0.870 km2)  6.86%
Area rank 279th of 566 in state
15th of 70 in county
Elevation 10 ft (3 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 20,554
 • Estimate (2015) 22,286
 • Rank 126th of 566 in state
13th of 70 in county
 • Density 4,509.3/sq mi (1,741.1/km2)
 • Density rank 128th of 566 in state
32nd of 70 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC−5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC−4)
ZIP code 07071
Area code(s) 201
FIPS code 3400342090
GNIS feature ID 0882225
Website www.lyndhurstnj.org

Lyndhurst is a township in Bergen County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 20,554, reflecting an increase of 1,171 (+6.0%) from the 19,383 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,121 (+6.1%) from the 18,262 counted in the 1990 Census.

History

Lyndhurst was originally formed as Union Township on February 19, 1852, from portions of Harrison Township. While it was still Union Township, portions of territory were taken to form Rutherford (as of September 21, 1881), Boiling Springs Township (April 17, 1889; now known as East Rutherford) and North Arlington (March 11, 1896). On May 15, 1917, the area was reincorporated by an act of the New Jersey Legislature as the Township of Lyndhurst, based on the results of a referendum held one week earlier. The township is named for Lord Lyndhurst.

Kingsland explosion

On January 11, 1917, a fire started in Building 30 of the Canadian Car and Foundry Company, in what is now Lyndhurst, in a plant that was producing munitions for sale to the United Kingdom and the Russian Empire during World War I. After a spill of flammable liquid started a fire in a building where shells were cleaned, about 500,000, three-inch (76 mm) explosive shells were discharged in about four hours, destroying the entire facility. It was said to have been a spectacle more magnificent than the explosion at Black Tom in Jersey City, New Jersey.

Tessie McNamara, who operated the company switchboard, was credited with saving 1,400 lives, contacting each of the buildings and shouting the warning, "Get out or go up!" Thanks to her dedication, no one was killed in the fire. The Lyndhurst Historical Society has created a vest pocket park dedicated to the memory of McNamara. The park is located on Clay Avenue, between Valley Brook Avenue and Wall Street West. The brick stack can be seen from this park.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 4.894 square miles (12.676 km2), including 4.558 square miles (11.806 km2) of land and 0.336 square miles (0.870 km2) of water (6.86%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Kingsland and South Rutherford.

The township borders North Arlington and Rutherford in Bergen County; Belleville and Nutley in Essex County; Kearny and Secaucus in Hudson County; and Clifton in Passaic County.

The Passaic River, crossed by the Avondale Bridge and the Lyndhurst Draw, creates the municipal and county border at the west. The eastern portion of the municipality is part of the uninhabited wetlands in the New Jersey Meadowlands.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 957
1870 2,057 114.9%
1880 3,164 53.8%
1890 1,560 * −50.7%
1900 1,590 * 1.9%
1910 4,076 156.4%
1920 9,515 133.4%
1930 17,362 82.5%
1940 17,454 0.5%
1950 19,980 14.5%
1960 21,867 9.4%
1970 22,729 3.9%
1980 20,326 −10.6%
1990 18,262 −10.2%
2000 19,383 6.1%
2010 20,554 6.0%
Est. 2015 22,286 8.4%
Population sources: 1860–1920
1860–1870 1870 1880–1890
1890–1910 1910–1930
1900–2010 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 20,554 people, 8,337 households, and 5,394 families residing in the township. The population density was 4,509.3 per square mile (1,741.1/km2). There were 8,787 housing units at an average density of 1,927.7 per square mile (744.3/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 82.97% (17,053) White, 1.98% (406) Black or African American, 0.17% (34) Native American, 6.59% (1,355) Asian, 0.03% (6) Pacific Islander, 5.57% (1,144) from other races, and 2.71% (556) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 18.34% (3,769) of the population.

There were 8,337 households out of which 25.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.9% were married couples living together, 12.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.3% were non-families. 28.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 10.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the township, the population was spread out with 18.9% under the age of 18, 7.8% from 18 to 24, 30.2% from 25 to 44, 27.5% from 45 to 64, and 15.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.3 years. For every 100 females there were 92.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 90.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $68,177 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,370) and the median family income was $79,579 (+/- $4,878). Males had a median income of $56,299 (+/- $6,347) versus $44,468 (+/- $2,406) for females. The per capita income for the township was $34,233 (+/- $2,119). About 3.8% of families and 4.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 6.6% of those under age 18 and 6.7% of those age 65 or over.

Same-sex couples headed 58 households in 2010, an increase from the 35 counted in 2000.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 19,383 people, 7,877 households, and 5,206 families residing in the township. The population density was 4,169.7 people per square mile (1,609.4/km2). There were 8,103 housing units at an average density of 1,743.1 per square mile (672.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 89.94% White, 9.0% Hispanic or Latino, 5.40% Asian, 0.61% African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 1.95% from two or more races, and 2.05% from other races.

As of the 2000 Census, 33.8% of township residents were of Italian ancestry, the 19th-highest percentage of any municipality in the United States, and eighth-highest in New Jersey, among all places with more than 1,000 residents identifying their ancestry.

There were 7,877 households out of which 25.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.1% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.9% were non-families. 28.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.46 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the township the age distribution of the population shows 19.1% under the age of 18, 7.6% from 18 to 24, 32.4% from 25 to 44, 23.1% from 45 to 64, and 17.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 91.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.2 males. Lyndhurst has the highest proportion of single females ages 18–25.

The median income for a household in the township was $53,375, and the median income for a family was $63,758. Males had a median income of $42,359 versus $35,429 for females. The per capita income for the township was $25,940. About 2.8% of families and 4.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.2% of those under age 18 and 7.6% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

Riverside County Park is a Bergen County park covering 85 acres (34 ha) located on Riverside Avenue between Lyndhurst and North Arlington. It has a playground, athletic fields, tennis courts, a Bocce ball court, and fitness center.

The township named Lewandowski Park and Lewandowski Street in honor of the three Lewandowski brothers, who were killed while serving in the armed forces during World War II.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 45.95 miles (73.95 km) of roadways, of which 37.81 miles (60.85 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.93 miles (7.93 km) by Bergen County and 2.15 miles (3.46 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 1.06 miles (1.71 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

Route 17 and County Route 507 pass through Lyndhurst. Route 3 is just over the northern border of Lyndhurst in neighboring Rutherford. Route 21 is across the Passaic River in neighboring Nutley and Clifton.

The New Jersey Turnpike Western Spur (Interstate 95) passes through the southeastern part, but the closest interchanges are in East Rutherford (Exit 16W) and Kearny (Exit 15W).

The Avondale-DeJessa Bridge, which connects Lyndhurst and Nutley over the Passaic River with one lane in each direction, carries more than 26,000 vehicles a day, and is among 22 bridges in Bergen County that have been classified as "structurally deficient".

Public transportation

Lyndhurst Draw (Passaic River)f
The Lyndhurst Draw crosses the Passaic River carrying the NJT Main Line and Metro North Port Jervis Line.

NJ Transit has two train stations in Lyndhurst, located at Lyndhurst Station and Kingsland Station. Trains at both stations operate on the Main Line to Hoboken Terminal, with transfers available at Secaucus Junction to New York Penn Station, Newark Penn Station, and Newark Airport, with transfers at Hoboken to PATH trains, Hudson Bergen Light Rail, and New York Waterway ferries. The trains travel over the Lyndhurst Draw, a railroad bridge crossing the Passaic River between Clifton and Lyndhurst that was constructed in 1901 and is owned and operated by NJ Transit Rail Operations.

New Jersey Transit offers buses serving Newark on the 76 route and to the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan on the 191, 192, 193 and 195 routes. Lyndhurst is also served by DeCamp Bus Lines routes 32, 44 and 99.

Historic sites

Lyndhurst is home to the following locations on the National Register of Historic Places:

  • River Road School – 400 Riverside Avenue (added 1977)
  • Jacob W. Van Winkle House – 316 Riverside Avenue (added 1983)
  • Jeremiah J. Yeareance House – 410 Riverside Avenue (added 1986)

Images for kids


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