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Perry County, Alabama facts for kids

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Perry County, Alabama
Map
Map of Alabama highlighting Perry County
Location in the state of Alabama
Map of the USA highlighting Alabama
Alabama's location in the U.S.
Statistics
Founded December 13, 1819
Seat Marion
Largest City Marion
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

724 sq mi (1,875 km²)
720 sq mi (1,865 km²)
4.2 sq mi (11 km²), 0.6%
PopulationEst.
 - (2015)
 - Density

9,652
15/sq mi (6/km²)
Time zone Central: UTC-6/-5
Website: www.pccommission.org
Named for: Oliver Hazard Perry
 
  • County Number 53 on Alabama Licence Plates

Perry County is a county of the U.S. state of Alabama. As of the 2010 census, the population was 10,591. Its county seat is Marion. The county was established in 1819 and is named in honor of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry of Rhode Island and the United States Navy.

History

The Perry County town of Marion was the site of a 1965 killing of an unarmed black man, Jimmie Lee Jackson, by a white state trooper, James Bonard Fowler, which sparked the Selma to Montgomery marches. In 2008, the county voted to establish a Barack Obama Day, a legal holiday, every second Monday of November.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 724 square miles (1,880 km2), of which 720 square miles (1,900 km2) is land and 4.2 square miles (11 km2) (0.6%) is water.

Major highways

  • US 80.svg U.S. Highway 80
  • Alabama 5.svg State Route 5
  • Alabama 14.svg State Route 14
  • Alabama 61.svg State Route 61
  • Alabama 175.svg State Route 175
  • Alabama 183.svg State Route 183
  • Alabama 219.svg State Route 219
  • Alabama 289.svg State Route 289

Adjacent counties

National protected area

  • Talladega National Forest (part)

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1820 3,646
1830 11,490 215.1%
1840 19,086 66.1%
1850 22,285 16.8%
1860 27,724 24.4%
1870 24,975 −9.9%
1880 30,741 23.1%
1890 29,332 −4.6%
1900 31,783 8.4%
1910 31,222 −1.8%
1920 25,373 −18.7%
1930 26,385 4.0%
1940 26,610 0.9%
1950 20,439 −23.2%
1960 17,358 −15.1%
1970 15,388 −11.3%
1980 15,012 −2.4%
1990 12,759 −15.0%
2000 11,861 −7.0%
2010 10,591 −10.7%
Est. 2015 9,652 −8.9%
U.S. Decennial Census
1790–1960 1900–1990
1990–2000 2010–2015

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 10,591 people residing in the county. 68.7% were Black or African American, 30.3% White, 0.3% Asian, 0.2% Native American, 0.2% of some other race and 0.4% of two or more races. 1.1% were Hispanic or Latino (of any race).

As of the census of 2000, there were 11,861 people, 4,333 households, and 3,046 families residing in the county. The population density was 16 people per square mile (6/km2). There were 5,406 housing units at an average density of 8 per square mile (3/km2). The racial makeup of the county was 68.38% Black or African American, 30.86% White, 0.08% Native American, 0.03% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.08% from other races, and 0.54% from two or more races. Nearly 0.86% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 4,333 households, out of which 33.80% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 40.40% were married couples living together, 25.10% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.70% were non-families. Nearly 27.90% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.00% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63, and the average family size was 3.23.

In the county, the population was spread out with 29.80% under the age of 18, 11.10% from 18 to 24, 23.60% from 25 to 44, 20.70% from 45 to 64, and 14.90% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females, there were 83.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 78.40 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $20,200, and the median income for a family was $26,150. Males had a median income of $26,272 versus $16,839 for females. The per capita income for the county was $10,948. About 31.20% of families and 35.40% of the population were below the poverty line, including 48.90% of those under age 18 and 25.80% of those age 65 or over. Perry County is considered to be the poorest county, in terms of household income, in the state of Alabama.

Communities

Cities

Unincorporated communities

Places of interest

Perry County is home to Perry Lakes Park, part of the Talladega National Forest, and the Alabama Women's Hall of Fame located at Judson College. Perry County is home to Marion Military Institute and Judson College.

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