Robbinsville Township, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Robbinsville Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Robbinsville
Robbinsville Town Center along Route 33
Robbinsville Town Center along Route 33
Motto: "Be at the Center of it All"
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Washington Township, Mercer County, New Jersey (currently known as Robbinsville Township)
Census Bureau map of Washington Township, Mercer County, New Jersey (currently known as Robbinsville Township)
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Mercer
Incorporated March 15, 1859, as Washington Township
Renamed January 1, 2008, as Robbinsville Township
Named for George R. Robbins
Area
 • Total 20.491 sq mi (53.072 km2)
 • Land 20.316 sq mi (52.618 km2)
 • Water 0.175 sq mi (0.454 km2)  0.86%
Area rank 139th of 565 in state
5th of 12 in county
Elevation 121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 13,642
 • Estimate (2015) 14,176
 • Rank 180th of 565 in state
9th of 12 in county
 • Density 671.5/sq mi (259.3/km2)
 • Density rank 416th of 566 in state
11th of 12 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08691
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3402163850
GNIS feature ID 0882122
Website www.robbinsville-twp.org

Robbinsville Township is a township in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States, in the New York City metropolitan area. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 13,642, reflecting an increase of 3,367 (+32.8%) from the 10,275 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 4,460 (+76.7%) from the 5,815 counted in the 1990 Census. The township is named for George R. Robbins, who lived in the area.

What is now Robbinsville Township was originally incorporated as Washington Township (named for George Washington) by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 15, 1859, from portions of East Windsor Township. On November 6, 2007, voters approved by a vote of 1,816 to 693 a measure that changed the township's name from Washington Township (the name of five other municipalities in New Jersey) to Robbinsville, named after a settlement within the township. The official changeover took place January 1, 2008, as signs and other items with "Washington" on them began to be changed.

Robbinsville Township is best known for reaching the Little League Softball World Series five of the last six years since 2008, and winning the championship in 2014. It was featured in a story by ESPNw as a perennial softball powerhouse.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township as of 2010 had a total area of 20.491 square miles (53.072 km2), including 20.316 square miles (52.618 km2) of land and 0.175 square miles (0.454 km2) of water (0.86%). The township borders East Windsor Township, Hamilton Township, and West Windsor Township in Mercer County; and Allentown, Millstone Township and Upper Freehold Township in Monmouth County. Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Allens Station, Carsons Mills, Hillside Terrace, Meadows Terrace, New Canton, New Sharon, Pages Corners, and Windsor.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 1,279
1870 1,294 1.2%
1880 1,281 −1.0%
1890 1,126 −12.1%
1900 1,157 2.8%
1910 1,090 −5.8%
1920 1,161 6.5%
1930 1,347 16.0%
1940 1,365 1.3%
1950 1,843 35.0%
1960 2,156 17.0%
1970 3,311 53.6%
1980 3,487 5.3%
1990 5,815 66.8%
2000 10,275 76.7%
2010 13,642 32.8%
Est. 2015 14,176 3.9%
Population sources:
1860-1920 1860-1870
1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 13,642 people, 5,087 households, and 3,591 families residing in the township. The population density was 671.5 per square mile (259.3/km2). There were 5,277 housing units at an average density of 259.7 per square mile (100.3/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 81.59% (11,131) White, 3.12% (426) Black or African American, 0.10% (13) Native American, 12.67% (1,729) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.71% (97) from other races, and 1.80% (246) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.13% (564) of the population.

There were 5,087 households out of which 41.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 60.0% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 29.4% were non-families. 25.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.66 and the average family size was 3.26.

In the township, the population was spread out with 28.7% under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 28.4% from 25 to 44, 28.8% from 45 to 64, and 9.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39.2 years. For every 100 females there were 91.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 87.8 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $92,440 (with a margin of error of +/- $11,773) and the median family income was $124,816 (+/- $10,353). Males had a median income of $96,156 (+/- $4,577) versus $65,327 (+/- $8,597) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $44,149 (+/- $2,813). About 2.7% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.7% of those under age 18 and 4.9% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 10,275 people, 4,074 households, and 2,815 families residing in the township. The population density was 501.8 people per square mile (193.7/km²). There were 4,163 housing units at an average density of 203.3 per square mile (78.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 91.00% White, 2.89% African American, 0.14% Native American, 4.31% Asian, 0.55% from other races, and 1.11% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.72% of the population.

There were 4,074 households out of which 36.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 59.8% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.9% were non-families. 26.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the township the population was spread out with 26.1% under the age of 18, 3.7% from 18 to 24, 37.9% from 25 to 44, 22.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.7 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $71,377, and the median income for a family was $90,878. Males had a median income of $61,589 versus $44,653 for females. The per capita income for the township was $35,529. About 2.5% of families and 3.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.1% of those under age 18 and 5.0% of those age 65 or over.

Development

Robbinsville Town Center, near the intersection of U.S. Route 130 and Route 33, is a mix of about 1,000 housing units, including loft-style condominiums, townhouses, duplexes, single-family homes, and real estate space.

Plans are underway to redevelop the portion of the township which lies to the south of Route 33, between the Hamilton Township border and U.S. Route 130. In December 2010, the state approved designating this property as an area in need of development, which allows the township to draft a plan and appoint a redeveloper to revive stalled construction projects there.

A planned Burger King restaurant at the corner of U.S. Route 130 south and Main Street has similarly generated concerns from neighbors. It has been since replaced with a Taco Bell restaurant which was scheduled to be completed in late 2014 but opened on April 15, 2015.

Robbinsville is home to a large warehouse colony, located on West Manor Way, just adjacent to the entrances and exit ramps to exits 7 and 8 off of Interstate 195. It is home to a variety of companies' distribution centers, including Scholastic Books, JDSU, Sleepy's, and Grainger Products. The Robbinsville Field House is a large membership gym located at the entrance to the warehouse colony near Route 526. An Amazon.com Fulfillment Center warehouse opened in the Matrix Business Park off of CR 539 in July 2014.

Transportation

Roads and highways

New Jersey Turnpike widening Robbinsville 2015
The New Jersey Turnpike (I-95) as seen from Windsor Road in Robbinsville

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 99.99 miles (160.92 km) of roadways, of which 78.26 miles (125.95 km) were maintained by the municipality, 8.16 miles (13.13 km) by Mercer County, 8.37 miles (13.47 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 5.20 miles (8.37 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

County routes that pass through include County Route 526 which passes through the center of the township, and County Route 524 and County Route 539 (Old York Road), both of which travel along the southeastern border of the township. Four major U.S./State/Interstate routes pass through the Township: U.S. Route 130, Route 33, Interstate 195 (the Central Jersey Expressway), and the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95).

I-195 is a major artery that connects Trenton to the Jersey Shore and the New Jersey Turnpike. Interchange 7A (for the Turnpike) is located in the township, with a 13-lane toll gate. 7A is well known for leading to not only Trenton, but to Six Flags Great Adventure in Jackson Township and "Shore Points." In addition, exit 7A is the connector between the free Interstate 295 versus the tolled Turnpike. Trucks and many other vehicles are now beginning to shunpike by using 295 north to 195 east, to the Turnpike northbound (and vice versa). Furthermore, the turnpike interchange gives access to motorists who wish to continue on I-95 (by using I-295) since I-95 (the section north of Trenton) "abruptly" ends in Lawrence Township. (All signage directs drivers wishing to continue on I-95 north to take I-295 south to I-195 east to the Turnpike, I-95 at exit 7A.)

In November 2006, a bypass of Route was proposed to be constructed near the intersection at CR 526 to the intersection of U.S. Route 130 and Gold Drive in the township of Hamilton.

The New Jersey Turnpike Authority completed a major Turnpike widening project by building new outer roadways (or truck lanes) extending the "dual-dual" configuration to exit 6 (Mansfield Township) from its former southern end at exit 8A (Monroe Township). In Robbinsville, the old exit 7A ramps were demolished and replaced with new ramp movements: two-lane high speed ramps to the turnpike north and from the turnpike south, and two-lane ramps from the turnpike north and to the turnpike south. The 7A toll gate was expanded with the addition of three more toll lanes. All the overpasses that cross over and pass underneath the turnpike were reconstructed. Finally, sound barriers were built at various locations along the turnpike, including by the Woods of Washington. The project was announced in December 2004 and completed in early November 2014.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service to and from Trenton on the 606 route.

Robbinsville Township is home to Trenton-Robbinsville Airport (identifier N87), an uncontrolled general aviation airport, with a 4,275-foot (1,303 m) long runway. The airport averages 30,000 aircraft operations per year.

Points of interest

Wineries

  • Working Dog Winery

Restaurants

  • Papa's Tomato Pies
  • De Lorenzo's Tomato Pies

Religious institutions

BAPS Robbinsville Mandir - Exterior
Swaminarayanan Akshardham in Robbinsville, the world's largest Hindu temple
  • Swaminarayanan Akshardham – the world's largest Hindu temple, inaugurated in 2014

Robbinsville Township, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.