Troy, Michigan facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Troy, Michigan
City
Eastward view of Big Beaver Road in Troy
Eastward view of Big Beaver Road in Troy
Motto: The City of Tomorrow ... Today
Location in the state of Michigan
Location in the state of Michigan
Country United States
State Michigan
County Oakland
Area
 • Total 33.64 sq mi (87.13 km2)
 • Land 33.47 sq mi (86.69 km2)
 • Water 0.17 sq mi (0.44 km2)
Elevation 748 ft (228 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 80,980
 • Estimate (2015) 83,280
 • Density 2,419.5/sq mi (934.2/km2)
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 48007, 48083, 48084, 48085, 48098, 48099
Area code(s) 248, 947
FIPS code 26-80700
GNIS feature ID 1615125
Website http://www.troymi.gov

Troy is a city located among Metropolitan Detroit's northern suburbs in Oakland County in the state of Michigan. The population was 80,980 at the 2010 census, making it the 11th-largest city in Michigan by population, and the largest city in Oakland County. Troy has become a business and shopping destination in the Metro Detroit area, with numerous office centers and the upscale Somerset Collection mall.

In 2011, Troy was ranked the safest city in Michigan, as well as the 19th safest city in the nation. In 2008, Troy was ranked 22nd on a list of "Best Places to Live" in the United States by CNN Money, using criteria including housing, quality of education, economic strength, and recreational opportunities. In 2008, Troy ranked as the fourth most affordable U.S. city with a median household income of approximately $79,000.

History

The earliest recorded purchases of land in what was known as Troy Township occurred in 1819. A couple of years later a settlement known as Troy Corners was established due to Johnson Niles buying 160 acres in the region. The area is currently the north-central area of Troy. In 1827 Troy Township was established. In 1955 Troy was officially incorporated primarily as a strategy for preventing border cities from taking more land.....http://www.citytowninfo.com/places/michigan/troy

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 33.64 square miles (87.13 km2), of which 33.47 square miles (86.69 km2) is land and 0.17 square miles (0.44 km2) is water. The latitude of Troy is 42.605 N, and the longitude is 83.15 W. The mean elevation is 748 ft (228 m).

Climate

Climate data for Troy, Michigan (48098)
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °F (°C) 66
(18.9)
65
(18.3)
78
(25.6)
87
(30.6)
92
(33.3)
102
(38.9)
104
(40)
101
(38.3)
98
(36.7)
90
(32.2)
79
(26.1)
64
(17.8)
104
(40)
Average high °F (°C) 30
(-1.1)
34
(1.1)
45
(7.2)
58
(14.4)
70
(21.1)
79
(26.1)
82
(27.8)
80
(26.7)
73
(22.8)
60
(15.6)
46
(7.8)
34
(1.1)
57.6
(14.21)
Average low °F (°C) 16
(-8.9)
18
(-7.8)
26
(-3.3)
36
(2.2)
48
(8.9)
57
(13.9)
61
(16.1)
60
(15.6)
53
(11.7)
42
(5.6)
32
(0)
22
(-5.6)
39.3
(4.03)
Record low °F (°C) -21
(-29.4)
-12
(-24.4)
-5
(-20.6)
8
(-13.3)
24
(-4.4)
34
(1.1)
41
(5)
40
(4.4)
31
(-0.6)
19
(-7.2)
2
(-16.7)
-11
(-23.9)
-21
(-29.4)
Precipitation inches (mm) 1.77
(45)
2.02
(51.3)
2.18
(55.4)
2.75
(69.9)
3.16
(80.3)
3.25
(82.6)
2.86
(72.6)
2.88
(73.2)
3.10
(78.7)
2.97
(75.4)
2.75
(69.9)
2.20
(55.9)
31.89
(810)
Source: Intellicast

Culture

The Troy Historic Village is a fully interactive historical museum chronicling the different stages of Troy's progression from its first settlers to the city it has become today. Located at the corners of Livernois Road and Wattles Road, the village is located behind the old city hall building. Open year-round, the village has ten original, complete structures which patrons may enter and observe how they functioned in the past and how they were decorated, as all buildings are full of artifacts from that period. Each structure is original and was painstakingly moved from its original location to the museum intact. Starting with a log and mud structure used by the first settlers, there is also an 18th-century schoolhouse and estate, a general store, a blacksmith's shop, a church along with the pastor's home, and the old city hall, which acts as a general museum. There is a gazebo in the center of the square which will host parties and period bands during annual festivities. Many schools from around the area plan field trips to the museum, and the church is also available for weddings.

In the summer of 2005, to commemorate the city's 50th anniversary, ceramic beaver statues, each standing four feet (1.2 m) high, were displayed at various locations in the city. The beaver is the symbol of Troy, and the city's main commercial thoroughfare (Big Beaver Road) is named after it.

Troy is also home to two of the largest Protestant churches in the USA, Kensington Community Church and Woodside Bible Church.

The Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America Metropolis of Detroit is headquartered in Troy.

Sports

In 2003, Troy was named Michigan's Sportstown by Sports Illustrated magazine for having the top community sports programs in the state.

Media

In addition to the Detroit News and Detroit Free Press, regional newspapers serving all of southeast Michigan, the city is served by the Daily Tribune (which is published twice a week), the Troy Beacon [1](published every Thursday), the Troy Times, and the Troy-Somerset Gazette [2] and, most recently, Troy Patch. The Troy Eccentric newspaper edition ceased publication in 2009.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1960 19,402
1970 39,419 103.2%
1980 67,102 70.2%
1990 72,884 8.6%
2000 80,959 11.1%
2010 80,980 0.0%
Est. 2015 83,280 2.8%
U.S. Decennial Census
2012 Estimate

According to a 2007 estimate, the median income for a household in the city was $84,330, and the median income for a family was $101,271. Males had a median income of $66,475 versus $41,026 for females. The per capita income for the city was $35,936. About 1.7% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.2% of those under age 18 and 5.5% of those age 65 or over.

2010 census

As of the census of 2010, there were 80,980 people, 30,703 households, and 22,443 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,419.5 inhabitants per square mile (934.2/km2). There were 32,907 housing units at an average density of 983.2 per square mile (379.6/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 74.1% White, 4.0% African American, 0.2% Native American, 19.1% Asian, 0.6% from other races, and 2.0% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.1% of the population.

There were 30,703 households of which 34.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.8% were married couples living together, 7.3% had a female householder with no husband present, 3.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 26.9% were non-families. 23.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.14.

The median age in the city was 41.8 years. 23.8% of residents were under the age of 18; 6.7% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 24% were from 25 to 44; 31.6% were from 45 to 64; and 13.8% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 49.3% male and 50.7% female.

2000 census

From the census of 2000, there were 80,959 people, 30,018 households, and 21,883 families residing in the city. The population density was 2,413.9 people per square mile (932.0/km²). There were 30,872 housing units at an average density of 920.5 per square mile (355.4/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 82.30% White, 2.09% African American, 0.15% Native American, 13.25% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 0.36% from other races, and 1.82% from two or more races. 1.46% of the population is Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 30,018 households out of which 36.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.5% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.1% were non-families. 22.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the city, the population was spread out with 26.2% under the age of 18, 6.7% from 18 to 24, 29.8% from 25 to 44, 27.1% from 45 to 64, and 10.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 98.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.8 males.

From 1990 to 2000, of all of the municipalities in Oakland, Wayne, and Macomb counties, Troy had the highest numeric growth in the Asian population. It had 4,932 Asians according to the 1990 U.S. Census and 10,730 according to the 2000 U.S. Census, an increase of 5,798 Asians. The increase gave Troy the largest Asian-American population in the tri-county area, surpassing that of Detroit.

Transportation

Oakland-Troy Airport

Oakland-Troy Airport (FAA LID: VLL, ICAO: KVLL), formerly (IATA: 7D2, ICAO: K7D2) is a small suburban general aviation airport operated by Oakland County and has a single 3,550 feet x 60 feet (1082 m x 18 m) paved runway.

The Oakland-Troy Airport is considered the County's 'executive' airport. Business travelers and tourists using private, corporate and charter aircraft benefit from the airport's convenient proximity to business, recreation and entertainment facilities. It is located between Maple Road and 14 Mile Road.

Charter passenger, air freight, as well as aircraft maintenance and fuel, are available on the field.

Troy was also home to the Big Beaver Airport, (IATA: 3BB), which was located at the corners of Big Beaver Road and John R Road. It opened in 1946 and closed in 1995 due to declining use and pressure to sell the land for commercial development.

Roads and freeways

  • I-75 cuts through the middle of Troy from the north-west corner bordering Bloomfield Township, and continuing southward towards the south-east border of the city entering Madison Heights. Exit numbers 65, 67, 69, and 72 directly service Troy.

M-1/Woodward Avenue and US-24/Telegraph Road are on the west side of Troy and provide access to the city.

Mile Roads

  • 14 Mile Road (Southern-most border with Madison Heights)
  • 15 Mile Road - Maple Road
  • 16 Mile Road - Big Beaver Road
  • 17 Mile Road - Wattles Road
  • 18 Mile Road - Long Lake Road
  • 19 Mile Road - Square Lake Road
  • 20 Mile Road - South Boulevard (Northern-most border with Rochester Hills)

Images for kids


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