Glen Ridge, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Glen Ridge, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Glen Ridge
Toney's Brook flowing through The Glen in Glen Ridge
Toney's Brook flowing through The Glen in Glen Ridge
Location in Essex County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Essex County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Glen Ridge, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Glen Ridge, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Essex
Incorporated February 13, 1895
Area
 • Total 1.287 sq mi (3.332 km2)
 • Land 1.282 sq mi (3.320 km2)
 • Water 0.005 sq mi (0.012 km2)  0.36%
Area rank 475th of 566 in state
21st of 22 in county
Elevation 197 ft (60 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 7,527
 • Estimate (2015) 7,660
 • Rank 305th of 566 in state
18th of 22 in county
 • Density 5,872.8/sq mi (2,267.5/km2)
 • Density rank 87th of 566 in state
11th of 22 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07028
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3401326610
GNIS feature ID 2390559
Website www.glenridgenj.org

Glen Ridge is a borough in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 7,527, reflecting an increase of 256 (+3.5%) from the 7,271 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 195 (+2.8%) from the 7,076 counted in the 1990 Census.

Glen Ridge was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 13, 1895, from portions of Bloomfield Township, based on the results of a referendum held the previous day. In 1982, the official name was changed to the "Township of Glen Ridge Borough" as one of seven four Essex County municipalities to pass a referendum to become a township, joining 11 municipalities that had already made the change, of what would ultimately be more than a dozen Essex County municipalities to reclassify themselves as townships in order take advantage of federal revenue sharing policies that allocated townships a greater share of government aid to municipalities on a per capita basis. Effective May 1993, the borough's original name of "Glen Ridge Borough" was restored. The borough's name comes from the ridge formed by Toney's Brook.

Of the many legacies left to the town by its founders, the one that has become its trademark is the gas lamps. With only 3,000 gaslights remaining in operation in the entire United States, Glen Ridge has 665 such lamps lighting its streets. In 1924, Glen Ridge became the first municipality in New Jersey to establish a zoning ordinance.

In 2010, Glen Ridge was ranked as the 38th Best Place to live by New Jersey Monthly magazine.

History

Glen Ridge traces its beginning to 1666 when 64 Connecticut families led by Robert Treat bought land from the Lenni Lenape Native Americans and named it New Ark to reflect a covenant to worship freely without persecution. The territory included the future towns of Bloomfield, Montclair, Belleville and Nutley. When Bloomfield was established in 1812, Glen Ridge was a section "on the hill" composed mostly of farms and woodlands with the exception of a thriving industrial area along Toney's Brook in the glen. For most of the nineteenth century, three water-powered mills produced lumber, calico, pasteboard boxes and brass fittings. A copper mine and a sandstone quarry were nearby.

With the arrival of the Newark and Bloomfield Railroad in 1856 and the construction of the Glen Ridge station and the New York and Greenwood Lake Railway station at today's Benson Street in 1872, Glen Ridge began its transition to a suburban residential community. Stately homes slowly replaced orchards and wooded fields.

Mountainside Hospital, a local hospital with more than 300 beds now known as HackensackUMC Mountainside, was founded in 1891. The Glen Ridge Country Club was founded in 1894, making it one of the state's oldest clubs.

Residents "on the hill" became unhappy with their representation on the Bloomfield Council. In spite of repeated requests to Bloomfield officials, roads remained unpaved, water and sewer systems were nonexistent, and schools were miles away. Area residents marked out the boundaries of a 1.45-square-mile (3.8 km2) area to secede from the adjoining town. At the election held on February 12, 1895, the decision to secede passed by only 23 votes. Robert Rudd was elected the first mayor of Glen Ridge.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.287 square miles (3.332 km2), including 1.282 square miles (3.320 km2) of land and 0.005 square miles (0.012 km2) of water (0.36%). It is bounded by Bloomfield, Montclair and East Orange.

Glen Ridge is a maximum of six blocks wide and in "the Panhandle" north of Bay Avenue it is only three or two blocks wide.

Climate

Glen Ridge has a temperate climate, with warm / hot humid summers and cool / cold winters, according to the Köppen climate classification humid subtropical climate. The town gets an average of 49 inches of rain per year and 20 inches of snowfall, compared to the US averages of 37 and 25 inches. Glen Ridge has 124 days of measurable precipitation a year.

There are typically about 205 sunny days per year in Glen Ridge. The temperature ranges from a high around 86 degrees in July and a low around 21 degrees in January. The comfort index for the town is 47 out of 100, compared to a national average of 44 (with higher numbers being more comfortable).

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1900 1,960
1910 3,260 66.3%
1920 4,620 41.7%
1930 7,365 59.4%
1940 7,331 −0.5%
1950 7,620 3.9%
1960 8,322 9.2%
1970 8,518 2.4%
1980 7,855 −7.8%
1990 7,076 −9.9%
2000 7,271 2.8%
2010 7,527 3.5%
Est. 2015 7,660 1.8%
Population sources: 1900–1920
1900–1910 1910–1930
1930–1990 2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 7,527 people, 2,476 households, and 2,033 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,872.8 per square mile (2,267.5/km2). There were 2,541 housing units at an average density of 1,982.6 per square mile (765.5/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 86.21% (6,489) White, 5.04% (379) Black or African American, 0.04% (3) Native American, 4.65% (350) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 1.37% (103) from other races, and 2.70% (203) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.01% (377) of the population.

There were 2,476 households out of which 49.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 70.9% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.9% were non-families. 14.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.03 and the average family size was 3.39.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 32.2% under the age of 18, 4.7% from 18 to 24, 22.3% from 25 to 44, 31.2% from 45 to 64, and 9.5% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.2 years. For every 100 females there were 95.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 89.0 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $160,511 (with a margin of error of ±$11,073) and the median family income was $173,466 (±$25,554). Males had a median income of $111,968 (±$11,975) versus $85,938 (±$24,626) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $64,222 (±$8,487). About 1.1% of families and 2.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 0.0% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 7,271 people, 2,458 households, and 1,978 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,695.0 people per square mile (2,193.2/km2). There were 2,490 housing units at an average density of 1,950.3 per square mile (751.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 89.18% White, 4.98% African American, 0.15% Native American, 3.34% Asian, 0.99% from other races, and 1.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.45% of the population.

There were 2,458 households out of which 46.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 69.9% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 19.5% were non-families. 16.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.95 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 30.7% under the age of 18, 4.5% from 18 to 24, 29.5% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38 years. For every 100 females there were 94.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.3 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $105,638, and the median income for a family was $120,650. Males had a median income of $91,161 versus $51,444 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $48,456. About 1.9% of families and 3.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.3% of those under age 18 and 4.1% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 23.29 miles (37.48 km) of roadways, of which 18.19 miles (29.27 km) were maintained by the municipality and 5.10 miles (8.21 km) by Essex County.

Glen Ridge is located conveniently in an area where various modes of transportation exist. Approximately half of the residents in Glen Ridge own two or more cars which allows them to access the New Jersey Turnpike, Newark Airport, the George Washington Bridge, and the Lincoln and Holland tunnels through major roads such as Interstate 80, Interstate 280, the Garden State Parkway, U.S. Route 46, Route 3 and Route 21.

Public transportation

NJ Transit provides bus service to Newark on the 11, 28 and 29. Buses from DeCamp Bus Lines run to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.

Commuters can also take trains from the Glen Ridge station (formerly named Ridgewood Avenue), where NJ Transit provides service to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan and to Hoboken Terminal via the Montclair-Boonton Line.

The town has a jitney service which provides transportation to and from the Glen Ridge Station for commuters. This service has a fee and is only available between certain hours in the day. The Freeman Parkway Bridge crosses over the railroad.

Images for kids


Glen Ridge, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.