East Orange, New Jersey facts for kids

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East Orange, New Jersey
City
City of East Orange
East Orange Fire Headquarters
East Orange Fire Headquarters
Location in Essex County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Essex County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of East Orange, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of East Orange, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Essex
Incorporated March 4, 1863
Area
 • Total 3.924 sq mi (10.164 km2)
Area rank 300th of 566 in state
10th of 22 in county
Elevation 177 ft (54 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 64,270
 • Estimate (2015) 64,949
 • Rank 20th of 566 in state
2nd of 22 in county
 • Density 16,377.1/sq mi (6,323.2/km2)
 • Density rank 12th of 566 in state
2nd of 22 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP codes 07017-07019
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3401319390
GNIS feature ID 0885200
Website www.eastorange-nj.gov

East Orange is a city in Essex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census the city's population was 64,270, reflecting a decline of 5,554 (−8.0%) from the 69,824 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 3,728 (−5.1%) from the 73,552 counted in the 1990 Census. The city was the state's 20th most-populous municipality in 2010, after having been the state's 14th most-populous municipality in 2000.

East Orange was originally incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 4, 1863, from portions of Orange town, and was reincorporated as a city on December 9, 1899, based on the results of a referendum held two days earlier.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the city had a total area of 3.924 square miles (10.164 km2), all of it land.

East Orange shares borders with Newark to the east and south, South Orange to the southwest, Orange to the west, and Glen Ridge and Bloomfield to the north.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the city include Ampere and Brick Church.

Neighborhoods

Eastorangemansion
A reminder of East Orange's former wealth. The Ambrose-Ward Mansion was built in 1898 for a book manufacturer, now the home of the African-American Fund of New Jersey

East Orange is officially divided into five wards, but is also unofficially divided into a number of neighborhoods.

  • Ampere: Anchored by the now defunct train station of the same name, The Ampere section was developed on land owned by Orange Water Works, after the construction of the Crocker Wheeler Company plant spurred development in the area. The station was named in honor of André-Marie Ampère, a pioneer in electrodynamics and reconstructed as a new Renaissance Revival station in 1907 and 1908. Roughly bounded by Bloomfield to the North, Lawton Street & Newark to the east, 4th Avenue to the south, and North Grove Street to the West.
  • Greenwood (Teen Streets): So named after Greenwood avenue and the "teen" streets that run through it. It is often grouped together with Ampere. This area was severely disturbed by the construction of Interstate 280 and the Garden State Parkway. The Grove Street Station of the former DL & W Railroad was located here at Grove and Main Streets. Roughly bounded by 4th Avenue to the North, North 15th Street/Newark to the East, Eaton Place/NJ Transit Morris & Essex Lines, and North Grove Street to the West.
  • Presidential Estates: Recently designated due to the streets in this area being named after early presidents of the United States. There are many large houses situated on streets lined with very old, very large shade trees in this neighborhood that are characteristic of the northern section of the city. Roughly Bounded by Bloomfield to the North, Montclair-Boonton Line and North Grove Street to the East, Springdale Avenue to the South and the Garden State Parkway to the West.
  • Elmwood Located in the southeastern part of the city. Elmwood Park serves this section of the city, with 7 tennis courts on Rhode Island Avenue, a basketball court on the corner of Elmwood Avenue and Oak Street, a swimming pool with a pool house, a walking track, a baseball field, a softball field and a renovated field house. The area holds one of the surviving Carnegie Libraries, the Elmwood Branch of the East Orange Public Library, opened in 1912.
  • Doddtown (Franklin): Named after John Dodd who founded and surveyed the area of the "Watsessing Plain". The former campus of Upsala College is located here. It was converted into the new East Orange Campus High School on the east side of Prospect Street, and an adjacent new housing subdivision. Roughly bounded by Bloomfield to the North, the Garden State Parkway to the south, Park Avenue to the South and Orange to the west.

Demographics

Historical populations
Census Pop.
1870 4,315
1880 8,349 93.5%
1890 13,282 59.1%
1900 21,506 61.9%
1910 34,371 59.8%
1920 50,710 47.5%
1930 68,020 34.1%
1940 68,945 1.4%
1950 79,340 15.1%
1960 77,259 −2.6%
1970 75,471 −2.3%
1980 77,878 3.2%
1990 73,552 −5.6%
2000 69,824 −5.1%
2010 64,270 −8.0%
Est. 2015 64,949 −7.0%
Population sources:
1870–1920 1870
1870–1890 1880–1890
1890–1910 1900–1930
1930–1990 2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 64,270 people, 24,945 households, and 14,742 families residing in the city. The population density was 16,377.1 per square mile (6,323.2/km2). There were 28,803 housing units at an average density of 7,339.5 per square mile (2,833.8/km2)*. The racial makeup of the city was 4.13% (2,657) White, 88.51% (56,887) Black or African American, 0.39% (248) Native American, 0.72% (465) Asian, 0.06% (38) Pacific Islander, 3.69% (2,370) from other races, and 2.50% (1,605) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.93% (5,095) of the population.

There were 24,945 households out of which 29.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 23.3% were married couples living together, 29.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 40.9% were non-families. 35.8% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.53 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the city, the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 10.2% from 18 to 24, 27.8% from 25 to 44, 24.6% from 45 to 64, and 11.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.0 years. For every 100 females there were 81.2 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 75.4 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $40,358 (with a margin of error of +/− $1,873) and the median family income was $50,995 (+/− $2,877). Males had a median income of $38,642 (+/− $1,851) versus $39,843 (+/− $2,187) for females. The per capita income for the city was $20,298 (+/− $746). About 17.8% of families and 21.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 32.5% of those under age 18 and 16.4% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 69,824 people, 26,024 households, and 16,082 families residing in the city. The population density was 17,776.6 people per square mile (6,859.8/km2). There were 28,485 housing units at an average density of 7,252.0 per square mile (2,798.5/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 89.46% Black or African American, 3.84% White, 0.25% Native American, 0.43% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 2.14% from other races, and 3.80% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.70% of the population.

Public Playgrounds in East Orange, New Jersey (1908)
Public playgrounds in East Orange, 1908
Apartment building, East Orange
A pre-WWII apartment on South Munn Avenue in East Orange.

There were 26,024 households out of which 31.9% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 26.0% were married couples living together, 28.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.2% were non-families. 33.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.63 and the average family size was 3.37.

In the city the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 9.8% from 18 to 24, 30.1% from 25 to 44, 20.8% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 33 years. For every 100 females there were 81.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 74.7 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $32,346, and the median income for a family was $38,562. Males had a median income of $31,905 versus $30,268 for females. The per capita income for the city was $16,488. About 15.9% of families and 19.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 24.7% of those under age 18 and 14.0% of those ages 65 or over.

As part of the 2000 Census, 89.46% of East Orange's residents identified themselves as being Black or African American. This was one of the highest percentages of African American and Caribbean American people in the United States, and the second-highest in New Jersey (behind Lawnside, at 93.6%) of all places with 1,000 or more residents identifying their ancestry. East Orange also has a large Haitian American community, with 2,852 persons claiming Haitian ancestry in the 2000 Census.

Although still a small percentage of total residents, Orange and East Orange have the largest concentrations of Guyanese Americans in the country. In the 2000 Census, 2.5% of East Orange residents identified as being of Guyanese ancestry. While Queens and Brooklyn had larger populations in terms of raw numbers, Orange (with 2.9%) and East Orange had the highest percentage of people of Guyanese ancestry of all places in the United States with at least 1,000 people identifying their ancestry.

Transportation

Roads and highways

East Orange lies at the intersection of the Garden State Parkway and Interstate 280.

The Garden State Parkway passes through the city, connecting Newark in the south to Bloomfield in the north. The Parkway is accessible at Interchange 145 for Interstate 280 and at Interchange 147 for Springdale Avenue.

As of May 2010, the city had a total of 83.43 miles (134.27 km) of roadways, of which 73.27 miles (117.92 km) were maintained by the municipality, 6.30 miles (10.14 km) by Essex County and 1.52 miles (2.45 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 2.34 miles (3.77 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

Public transportation

Local transportation around the city and into neighboring communities is provided by ONE Bus bus routes 24 & 44 and multiple NJ Transit public bus lines, which includes routes 5, 21, 34, 41, 71, 73, 79, 90, 92, 94, and 97.

New Jersey Transit also runs two commuter rail train stations in East Orange, both located along the Morris & Essex Lines. The East Orange Station is found beside the westbound lanes of Interstate 280, directly across its parking lot from East Orange City Hall. Just one mile west up Main Street is Brick Church Station, the city's second rail stop and the more heavily used of the two. Both have seven-day service to Hoboken Terminal as well as Midtown Direct service to New York Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan.

The city is 7.8 miles (12.6 km) from Newark Liberty International Airport in the nearby cities of Newark and Elizabeth.

Sister city

East Orange is a sister city of:

Country City County/District/Province/Region/State Date
 Kenya Nakuru Nakuru County unknown

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