Mountain Lakes, New Jersey facts for kids

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Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Mountain Lakes
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Morris County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated April 29, 1924
Area
 • Total 2.885 sq mi (7.473 km2)
 • Land 2.616 sq mi (6.775 km2)
 • Water 0.269 sq mi (0.698 km2)  9.34%
Area rank 343rd of 566 in state
28th of 39 in county
Elevation 489 ft (149 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 4,160
 • Estimate (2015) 4,288
 • Rank 406th of 566 in state
33rd of 39 in county
 • Density 1,590.3/sq mi (614.0/km2)
 • Density rank 327th of 566 in state
18th of 39 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07046
Area code(s) 973
FIPS code 3402748480
GNIS feature ID 0885310
Website www.mtnlakes.org
Location Roughly bounded by Pocono Road, Denville Township line, Fanny Road, and RR Tracks, Mountain Lakes, New Jersey
Area 1,397 acres (565 ha)
Built 1908
Architect Hapgood, Herbert J.; Holton, Arthur T.
Architectural style(s) Late 19th And Early 20th Century American Movements, Late 19th And 20th Century Revivals
Governing body Local

Mountain Lakes is a borough in Morris County, New Jersey, United States, and a suburb of New York City. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 4,160, reflecting a decline of 96 (-2.3%) from the 4,256 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 409 (+10.6%) from the 3,847 counted in the 1990 Census.

Mountain Lakes was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 3, 1924, from portions of Boonton Township and Hanover Township, subject to the results of a referendum passed on April 29, 1924. The borough was named for a pair of lakes in the area.

New Jersey Monthly magazine ranked Mountain Lakes as the 26th best place to live in New Jersey in its rankings of the "New Jersey's Top Towns 2011-2012" in New Jersey.

According to Neighborhood Scout, Mountain Lakes is one of New Jersey's most highly educated municipalities, with 85.94% of adults attaining a four-year undergraduate or graduate degree, quadruple the national average of 21.84%, while the percentage of white-collar workers was 98.77%.

History

Grimes Homestead, is an 18th-century historic home that served as a way station on the Underground Railroad.

Mountain Lakes was originally a planned community, founded in 1910 by Herbert Hapgood. It became an independent town in 1924.

The United States Navy's Underwater Sound Reference Laboratories was located in Mountain Lakes during World War II.

Mountain Lakes had a discriminatory "gentleman's agreement" from its inception up through the 1960s, preventing African-Americans, Jews, Latinos, Catholics, and other "undesirable groupings" from living there. While this has changed in recent years, the town still has a less diverse population than the rest of New Jersey, or Morris County.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 2.885 square miles (7.473 km2), including 2.616 square miles (6.775 km2) of land and 0.269 square miles (0.698 km2) of water (9.34%).

Part of The Tourne county park is in Mountain Lakes.

Man-made lakes in Mountain Lakes include Birchwood Lake, Crystal Lake, Mountain Lake, Sunset Lake, Wildwood Lake, and Cove Lake. It is only legal to swim in Birchwood Lake, and Mountain Lake in the areas that are roped off. Swimming is allowed between the hours of 5 am to 10 PM every day between the months of June and August with a beach badge purchased at the borough hall.

The borough borders Parsippany-Troy Hills, to the east and south, the town of Boonton to the northeast, Boonton Township to the northwest and Denville to the west all of which are located in Morris County.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1930 2,132
1940 2,205 3.4%
1950 2,806 27.3%
1960 4,037 43.9%
1970 4,739 17.4%
1980 4,153 −12.4%
1990 3,847 −7.4%
2000 4,256 10.6%
2010 4,160 −2.3%
Est. 2015 4,288 3.1%
Population sources:1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 4,160 people, 1,313 households, and 1,144 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,590.3 per square mile (614.0/km2). There were 1,363 housing units at an average density of 521.1 per square mile (201.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 89.57% (3,726) White, 0.36% (15) Black or African American, 0.07% (3) Native American, 7.64% (318) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.34% (14) from other races, and 2.02% (84) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.55% (106) of the population.

There were 1,313 households out of which 53.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 78.9% were married couples living together, 6.0% had a female householder with no husband present, and 12.9% were non-families. 11.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.17 and the average family size was 3.44.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 34.9% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 16.8% from 25 to 44, 33.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41.8 years. For every 100 females there were 99.9 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 93.5 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $155,139 (with a margin of error of +/- $20,127) and the median family income was $181,600 (+/- $26,906). Males had a median income of $144,688 (+/- $24,336) versus $77,734 (+/- $26,273) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $75,525 (+/- $11,503). About 2.1% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.0% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.

According to The New York Times, a diverse group of foreigners have been moving to the borough, including Germans, Chinese, South Africans, and New Zealanders have been moving into the borough.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 4,256 people, 1,330 households, and 1,186 families residing in the borough. The population density was 1,593.0 people per square mile (615.4/km2). There were 1,357 housing units at an average density of 507.9 per square mile (196.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.05% White, 0.38% African American, 5.17% Asian, 0.07% Pacific Islander, 0.52% from other races, and 0.82% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.69% of the population.

There were 1,330 households out of which 53.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 83.3% were married couples living together, 3.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 10.8% were non-families. 9.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 4.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.20 and the average family size was 3.41.

In the borough the population was spread out with 35.7% under the age of 18, 3.1% from 18 to 24, 23.4% from 25 to 44, 28.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 99.2 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 94.0 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $141,757, and the median income for a family was $153,227. Males had a median income of $100,000+ versus $61,098 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $65,086. About 1.4% of families and 2.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.7% of those under age 18 and 2.3% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 29.38 miles (47.28 km) of roadways, of which 25.86 miles (41.62 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.32 miles (3.73 km) by Morris County and 1.20 miles (1.93 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Public transportation

NJ Transit offers train service at the Mountain Lakes station on the Montclair-Boonton Line to Hoboken Terminal and to Pennsylvania Station in Midtown Manhattan via Midtown Direct through Newark Broad Street Station.

Lakeland Bus Lines provides service along Route 46 operating between Dover and the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan.


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