Snyder County, Pennsylvania facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
Snyder County, Pennsylvania
Map
Map of Pennsylvania highlighting Snyder County
Location in the state of Pennsylvania
Map of the USA highlighting Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania's location in the U.S.
Statistics
Founded March 2, 1855
Seat Middleburg
Largest borough Selinsgrove
Area
 - Total
 - Land
 - Water

332 sq mi (860 km²)
329 sq mi (852 km²)
2.8 sq mi (7 km²), 0.8%
PopulationEst.
 - (2015)
 - Density

40,444
123/sq mi (47/km²)
Time zone Eastern: UTC-5/-4
Website: www.snydercounty.org
Named for: Simon Snyder

Snyder County is a county in the U.S. state of Pennsylvania. As of the 2010 census, the population was 39,702. The county seat is Middleburg. Snyder County was formed in 1855 from parts of Union County.

Snyder County comprises the Selinsgrove, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area, which is also included in the Bloomsburg-Berwick-Sunbury, PA Combined Statistical Area.

History

Snyder County was settled in the 1740s by Pennsylvania Germans from Berks and Lancaster counties, and became an independent political unit on March 2, 1855, when formed under part of Union County. Snyder County took its name in honor of the famous citizen and political figure Simon Snyder, who was governor of Pennsylvania for three terms, from 1808 to 1817, and made his home in Selinsgrove. The county seat of Middleburg was laid out in 1800 and incorporated in 1864.

Geography

According to the U.S. Census Bureau, the county has a total area of 332 square miles (860 km2), of which 329 square miles (850 km2) is land and 2.8 square miles (7.3 km2) (0.8%) is water. It is the fifth-smallest county in Pennsylvania by area. Snyder County is in the Ridge and Valley region of the Appalachian Mountains. Two parallel mountain ridges, Shade Mountain and Jacks Mountain, run southwest to northeast. The Susquehanna River is the eastern border. Between the ridges are steep hills, gently rolling hills, and flat creek valleys. With over 400 active farms in the county, agriculture plays an important role in the economy and environment. Roughly half the county remains forested with both softwoods and hardwoods. These woods provide a place for wildlife to roam which provides for the sport of hunting.

Adjacent counties

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 15,035
1870 15,606 3.8%
1880 17,797 14.0%
1890 17,651 −0.8%
1900 17,304 −2.0%
1910 16,800 −2.9%
1920 17,129 2.0%
1930 18,836 10.0%
1940 20,208 7.3%
1950 22,912 13.4%
1960 25,922 13.1%
1970 29,269 12.9%
1980 33,584 14.7%
1990 36,680 9.2%
2000 37,546 2.4%
2010 39,702 5.7%
Est. 2015 40,444 1.9%
U.S. Decennial Census
1790-1960 1900-1990
1990-2000 2010-2013

According to the 2010 federal census, there were 39,702 people, 14,414 households, and 9,981 families residing in the county. The population density was 113 people per square mile (44/km²). There were 14,890 housing units at an average density of 45 per square mile (17/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97% White, 1.2% Black or African American, 0.1% Native American, 0.42% Asian, and 0.07% Pacific Islander. Two percent of the population were Hispanic or Latino. US Veterans - 2,681. Median household income (in 2014 dollars), 2010-2014 was reported as $48,718, while the per capita income was $23,886. In 2014, the median household income in the USA was $53,700.

As of the census of 2000, there were 37,546 people, 13,654 households, and 9,981 families residing in the county. The population density was 113 people per square mile (44/km²). There were 14,890 housing units at an average density of 45 per square mile (17/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 97.93% White, 0.82% Black or African American, 0.05% Native American, 0.42% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander. 0.98% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race. 48.2% were of German, 17.2% American and 5.5% English ancestry according to Census 2000.

There were 13,654 households out of which 32.10% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.00% were married couples living together, 7.40% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.90% were non-families. 22.40% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.30% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.02.

In the county, the population was spread out with 24.00% under the age of 18, 11.20% from 18 to 24, 27.40% from 25 to 44, 23.30% from 45 to 64, and 14.00% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 95.60 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 93.10 males.

The average wage per job reported for 2003 was $26,650. County population in 2003 had risen to 37,965. Jobs in 2003 were 17,907, with a total labor force in 2004 of 19,863. The unemployment rate in 2004 was reported at 4.8%. Average household size in Snyder County in 2004 was 2.58.

County poverty demographics

According to research by The Center for Rural Pennsylvania, which is a legislative agency of the Pennsylvania General Assembly, the poverty rate for Snyder County was 13.1% in 2014. The statewide poverty rate was 13.6% in 2014. The 2012 childhood poverty rate by public school district was: Midd-West School District - 47.1% living at 185% or below than the Federal Poverty Level, and Selinsgrove Area School District - 39.5%.

According to the US Census Bureau, from 2009-2014 Snyder County saw a 51% increase in the number of families in the federal food assistance program called SNAP (Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program). The number of people or families receiving monthly SNAP dollars rose from 1,006 in 2009 to 1,511 people in 2014.

Teen Pregnancy rate

The Pennsylvania Department of Health reports the annual teens aged 15–19 birth rate. From 2011 to 2015, Snyder County experienced a 17% decline in teen pregnancies. In Pennsylvania the majority of pupils graduate from high school at age 18 years old. Snyder County is home to a large Amish population where pregnancies at 17–19 years old are common.

  • 2015 - 228
  • 2014 - 239
  • 2013 - 258
  • 2012 - 263
  • 2011 - 274

Micropolitan Statistical Area

BloomsburgBerwickSunburyCSA2014
Map of the Bloomsburg-Berwick-Sunbury, PA Combined Statistical Area (CSA), composed of the following parts:      Bloomsburg-Berwick, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA)      Sunbury, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (μSA)      Lewisburg, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (μSA)      Selinsgrove, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (μSA)
See also: List of Micropolitan Statistical Areas and List of Combined Statistical Areas

The United States Office of Management and Budget has designated Snyder County as the Selinsgrove, PA Micropolitan Statistical Area (µSA). As of the 2010 U.S. Census the micropolitan area ranked 15th most populous in the State of Pennsylvania and the 313th most populous in the United States with a population of 39,702. Snyder County is also a part of the Bloomsburg-Berwick-Sunbury, PA Combined Statistical Area (CSA), which combines the populations of Snyder County, as well as Columbia, Montour, Northumberland and Union Counties in Pennsylvania. The Combined Statistical Area ranked 8th in the State of Pennsylvania and 115th most populous in the United States with a population of 264,739.

Utilities

Electric – All 21 municipalities within Snyder County receive electric service from PPL Electric Utilities, Inc. According to the U.S. Department of Energy, a 500 kilovolt line runs through Snyder County. Three 138 kilovolt lines stem from this 500 kilovolt line at the Sunbury Generation coal-fired power plant in Shamokin Dam, which is capable of producing roughly 400 megawatts of electrical power.

Water – Water service in Snyder County is provided by various municipal and regional authorities, private water providers, and private well water sources.

Gas – UGI Penn Natural Gas is the only natural gas provider in Snyder County, providing service to Jackson, Middlecreek, Monroe, and Penn Townships, as well as Selinsgrove and Shamokin Dam Boroughs. Several propane dealers exist to service the rural community.

Communications – Verizon provides telephone service and EvenLink provides VoIP telephone service to all 21 municipalities in Snyder County.

Cable television service is provided by Service Electric Cablevision, Nittany Media, Inc., Zampelli Electronics, and Beaver Springs Community TV Association.

High-speed Internet access is principally provided by Verizon, EvenLink, and Service Electric Cablevision.

There are several restaurants featuring high speed wireless internet in Snyder County. Dunkin Donuts and Applebee's provide fee-based services provided by PenTeleData Unleashed. The White House Deli in MP Mills provides a free service.

Transportation

Snyder County has two main arteries. U.S. Routes 11/15 travel through the county on the east end generally following the path of the Susquehanna River. The highway is a major travel artery through the region. Flow is constant (truck and vehicle) with very heavy loads and backups on Fridays (especially in the afternoon) and holiday weekends. There is a proposed major highway bypass project called the Central Susquehanna Valley Thruway. It is meeting with funding challenges that have delayed the project for decades. The proposed thruway would cross Monroe Township just north of Shamokin Dam. Many residential properties are designated for eminent domain actions. Residents along the proposed route have expressed concerns about the negative impact on their quality of life that the thruway would mean. Others are concerned that the bypass will mean the loss of local revenue and jobs that the traffic brings to the many local restaurants and hotels that are located along the current U.S. 11/15 highway. In June 2007 another two-year delay was announced by the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation.

U.S. Route 522 begins in Selinsgrove and travels west through Kreamer, Middleburg and on to Lewistown. Route 35 begins on U.S. 11/15 south of Selinsgrove and runs roughly parallel to Route 522 crossing through Freeburg and Mount Pleasant Mills then westward to McAllisterville and Richfield in western Snyder County.

Snyder County is in Pennsylvania Department Of Transportation District 3. According to PennDOT there are 240 state-owned bridges in the county. Currently, many existing bridges and roads in the county are in need of repair. In 2007, 27 of the bridges were rated structurally deficient and 4 were posted with weight limits. The bridge that spans Middle Creek in Kreamer has been deemed structurally deficient by the state.

State routes 235, 104 and 204 cross the county in a north-south direction.

Communities

Map of Snyder County Pennsylvania With Municipal and Township Labels
Map of Snyder County with municipal labels showing boroughs (red), townships (white), and census-designated places (blue)

Under Pennsylvania law, there are four types of incorporated municipalities: cities, boroughs, townships, and, in at most two cases, towns. The following boroughs and townships are located in Snyder County:

Boroughs

Townships

  • Adams
  • Beaver
  • Center
  • Chapman
  • Franklin
  • Jackson
  • Middlecreek
  • Monroe
  • Penn
  • Perry
  • Spring
  • Union
  • Washington
  • West Beaver
  • West Perry

Census-designated places

Census-designated places are geographical areas designated by the U.S. Census Bureau for the purposes of compiling demographic data. They are not actual jurisdictions under Pennsylvania law. Other unincorporated communities, such as villages, may be listed here as well.

Population ranking

The population ranking of the following table is based on the 2010 census of Snyder County.

county seat

Rank City/Town/etc. Municipal type Population (2010 Census)
1 Selinsgrove Borough 5,654
2 Shamokin Dam Borough 1,686
3 Hummels Wharf CDP 1,353
4 Middleburg Borough 1,309
5 Beavertown Borough 965
6 McClure Borough 941
7 Kreamer CDP 822
8 Port Trevorton CDP 769
9 Penns Creek CDP 715
10 Beaver Springs CDP 674
11 Freeburg Borough 575
12 Richfield (partially in Juniata County) CDP 549
13 Mount Pleasant Mills CDP 464
14 Kratzerville CDP 383
15 Paxtonville CDP 265
16 Troxelville CDP 221

Culture

Snyder County is well known for its unmistakable Pennsylvania German language and culture, agricultural heritage, as well as its fraktur, Kentucky rifles, wood products industries, Middleswarth chip factory, and the annual fairs, festivals, and auctions that keep the local heritage alive. Some of the more famous historical structures of the county are the Governor Snyder Mansion, Pomfret's Castle, Schoch Block House, ruins of the Pennsylvania Canal, and its covered bridges. Snyder County is home to Snyder-Middleswarth State Park, the Tall Timbers Natural Area, and thirteen Pennsylvania state historical markers.

Historical markers

  • Pennsylvania Canal (Susquehanna Division) – US 11 & 15 at Port Trevorton
  • Simon Snyder – SR 2017 (old US 11 & 15) just S of Selinsgrove
  • Simon Snyder Mansion (Plaque) – 121 N. Market St. (old US 11 & 15), Selinsgrove
  • Coxey’s Army – 814 N. Market St. (old US 11 & 15), Selinsgrove
  • Penns Creek Massacre – SR 2017 (old US 11 & 15) just N of Selinsgrove
  • Penns Creek Massacre (Plaque) – S end Old Trail (just E of US 11 & 15), Penns Creek N of Selinsgrove
  • Schoch Blockhouse – US 522 at Kreamer
  • Susquehanna University – US 522, .5 mile W of old US 11 & 15, Selinsgrove
  • Albany Purchase – US 522 (old US 11 & 15) 1 mile N of Selinsgrove
  • Harris Ambush (Plaque) – At the Old Bridge, 1/2 mile W of Selinsgrove
  • Sunbury – U.S. 11 & 15, 4 miles N of Selinsgrove
  • Shikellamy – US 11, 5.4 miles N of Selinsgrove entrance to Shikellamy State Park
  • Snyder County – County courthouse, 9 W. Market St. (US 522), Middleburg

Images for kids


Snyder County, Pennsylvania Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.