North Brunswick, New Jersey facts for kids

Kids Encyclopedia Facts
North Brunswick, New Jersey
Township
Township of North Brunswick
Rutgers Gardens in North Brunswick
Rutgers Gardens in North Brunswick
North Brunswick Township highlighted in Middlesex County.
North Brunswick Township highlighted in Middlesex County.
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Middlesex
First mention February 28, 1779
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Named for Braunschweig, Germany or King George II of Great Britain
Area
 • Total 12.272 sq mi (31.783 km2)
 • Land 11.997 sq mi (31.071 km2)
 • Water 0.275 sq mi (0.712 km2)  2.24%
Area rank 187th of 566 in state
10th of 25 in county
Elevation 121 ft (37 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 40,742
 • Estimate (2015) 42,725
 • Rank 50th of 566 in state
10th of 25 in county
 • Density 3,396.2/sq mi (1,311.3/km2)
 • Density rank 192nd of 566 in state
14th of 25 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08902
Area code(s) 732 and 908
FIPS code 3402352560
GNIS feature ID 0882164
Website www.northbrunswicknj.gov

North Brunswick is a township in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. At the 2010 United States Census, the population was 40,742, reflecting an increase of 4,455 (+12.3%) from the 36,287 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 5,000 (+16.0%) from the 31,287 counted in the 1990 Census. Located south of the city of New Brunswick, North Brunswick was named for its earlier-established neighbor, South Brunswick, New Jersey. The "Brunswick" comes from New Brunswick, which was named after the German city of Braunschweig (formerly translated in English as Brunswick) or for the British royal House of Brunswick. North and South Brunswick, in turn, became the namesakes for East Brunswick. Alternatively, the city gets its name from King George II of Great Britain, the Duke of Brunswick-Lüneburg.

History

North Brunswick was first mentioned in Middlesex Freeholder Board minutes of February 28, 1779. North Brunswick Township was incorporated on February 21, 1798 by the New Jersey Legislature's Township Act of 1798 as the state's initial group of 104 townships. Portions of the township have since separated into East Brunswick Township (February 28, 1860), and Milltown (January 29, 1889).

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 12.272 square miles (31.783 km2), including 11.997 square miles (31.071 km2) of land and 0.275 square miles (0.712 km2) of water (2.24%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Adams, Berdines Corner, Black Horse, Bodines Corner, Franklin Park, Georges Road, Livingston Park, Maple Meade, Patricks Corner and Red Lion. The northern portion of the township, near the New Brunswick border, is mainly middle class while the southern and eastern sections tend to be more affluent, with a few homes priced around $1 million.

The township borders East Brunswick Township, Milltown, New Brunswick and South Brunswick Township in Middlesex County, and Franklin Township in Somerset County.

Like many other New Jersey communities, North Brunswick is faced with the issues of suburban sprawl and open space preservation. The 105.21-acre (42.58 ha) Otken Farm property on Route 130 between Adams Lane and Renaissance Boulevard was purchased by the township to be converted into North Brunswick Community Park, which opened in April 2007. The nearby Pulda Farm, on Route 130 at Wood Avenue, however may be developed into an age-restricted community pending legal challenge. Re-development of the site of the former Johnson & Johnson pharmaceutical plant on U.S. Route 1 between Adams Lane and Aaron Road is currently the subject of a public hearing process that will determine what may be built on the property. There is also discussion of building an NJ Transit commuter railroad station on the site, along the Northeast Corridor Line. Other parcels slated for development into retail shopping centers include the currently wooded corner of Route 130 and Adams Lane diagonally across from the Maple Meade Plaza.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 2,312
1810 3,980
1820 4,275 7.4%
1830 5,274 23.4%
1840 5,866 11.2%
1850 10,019 70.8%
1860 1,145 * −88.6%
1870 1,124 −1.8%
1880 1,251 11.3%
1890 1,238 −1.0%
1900 847 * −31.6%
1910 990 16.9%
1920 1,399 41.3%
1930 3,622 158.9%
1940 4,562 26.0%
1950 6,450 41.4%
1960 10,099 56.6%
1970 16,691 65.3%
1980 22,220 33.1%
1990 31,287 40.8%
2000 36,287 16.0%
2010 40,742 12.3%
Est. 2015 42,725 4.9%
Population sources: 1790-1920
1840 1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 40,742 people, 14,551 households, and 10,404 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,396.2 per square mile (1,311.3/km2). There were 15,045 housing units at an average density of 1,254.1 per square mile (484.2/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 46.61% (18,991) White, 17.47% (7,116) Black or African American, 0.42% (171) Native American, 24.27% (9,888) Asian, 0.04% (15) Pacific Islander, 8.16% (3,323) from other races, and 3.04% (1,238) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 17.73% (7,223) of the population.

There were 14,551 households out of which 35.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.4% were married couples living together, 13.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 28.5% were non-families. 22.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.22.

In the township, the population was spread out with 23.4% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 33.3% from 25 to 44, 25.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.5 years. For every 100 females there were 97.6 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 95.2 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $78,469 (with a margin of error of +/- $3,515) and the median family income was $91,053 (+/- $3,268). Males had a median income of $60,285 (+/- $3,591) versus $50,018 (+/- $2,499) for females. The per capita income for the township was $32,944 (+/- $1,441). About 4.5% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.2% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

At the 2000 United States Census there were 36,287 people, 13,635 households and 9,367 families residing in the township. The population density was 3,018.3 per square mile (1,165.6/km2). There were 13,932 housing units at an average density of 1,158.8 per square mile (447.5/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 62.73% White, 15.27% African American, 0.17% Native American, 14.20% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 4.70% from other races, and 2.89% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.40% of the population.

There were 13,635 households of which 33.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.4% were married couples living together, 11.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.3% were non-families. 24.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.58 and the average family size was 3.12.

23.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 36.5% from 25 to 44, 22.5% from 45 to 64, and 10.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35 years. For every 100 females there were 98.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.3 males.

The median household income in the township was $61,325, and the median income for a family was $70,812. Males had a median income of $48,961 versus $35,971 for females. The per capita income for the township was $28,431. 4.7% of the population and 2.7% of families were below the poverty line. 4.7% of the population and 2.7% of families were below the poverty line. Of the total people living in poverty, 4.0% were under the age of 18 and 8.5% were 65 or older.

In addition to the township's residents, an average daily population of 1,182 inmates are housed at the Middlesex County Adult Correctional Center, located on Route 130 at Apple Orchard Lane.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 101.51 miles (163.36 km) of roadways, of which 77.57 miles (124.84 km) were maintained by the municipality, 7.23 miles (11.64 km) by Middlesex County and 16.71 miles (26.89 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation. Major roads in North Brunswick include:

  • U.S. Route 130, which begins at an intersection with Route 171's terminus.
  • US 1, the largest highway in North Brunswick.
  • New Jersey Route 26, also known as Livingston Avenue.
  • New Jersey Route 27, along the western border.
  • New Jersey Route 91, also known as Jersey Avenue.
  • New Jersey Route 171, which starts at the northern terminus of Route 130 as Georges Road in the Berdines Corner section of township and enters New Brunswick.
  • County Route 682, also known as Finnegans Lane, a 1.05-mile (1.69 km) along the southern border.
  • County Route 680, also known as How Lane
  • County Route 620, concurrent with Nassau Street east of Georges Road/Route 171.
  • County Route 608, in two sections known as Cozzens Lane and Adams Lane.
  • County Route 606, also known as Milltown Road.

Limited access roads are accessible outside the township, such as Interstate 287 in bordering Franklin Township. The New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95) is accessible from exits in East Brunswick and South Brunswick.

Public transportation

NJ Transit Rail Operations (NJT) originates trains to Penn Station in Midtown Manhattan during peak hours from the Jersey Avenue station in New Brunswick. A new North Brunswick station on its Northeast Corridor Line has been proposed for the former Johnson & Johnson site on Route 1 and Aaron Road. In January 2013 NJT announced that the station would be built in 2018 in conjunction with the transit-oriented development. In addition to the new station the agency plans to build a flyover (balloon loop and flying junction) called the MId-Line Loop south of the new station allowing trains turn around and enter and leave the Northeast Corridor without crossing over tracks.

NJ Transit provides local bus service on the 811 and 814 routes.

Community

There are various communities within North Brunswick. One of many is the Italian American community. The Italian American community of North Brunswick and other Middlesex County towns celebrate their heritage annually at Carnevale Italiano, a 20-year-old carnival organized by the Italian-American Social Club. This event has been a huge part of North Brunswick's culture, as Middlesex County ranks fourth out of New Jersey's 21 counties in its population of Italian Americans. A highlight of the carnival is a fireworks show by Grucci.

Each year, the sports associations of the township host the North Brunswick Youth Sports Festival. The township high school also hosts a heritage day each year in Babbage Park. This festival showcases the many cultures that make up North Brunswick.


North Brunswick, New Jersey Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.