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Carteret, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Carteret
Carteret Waterfront Park
Carteret Waterfront Park
Motto(s): 
The Center of it All
Map of Carteret in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Carteret in Middlesex County. Inset: Location of Middlesex County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Carteret, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Carteret, New Jersey
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Coordinates: 40°35′02″N 74°13′39″W / 40.58379°N 74.227458°W / 40.58379; -74.227458Coordinates: 40°35′02″N 74°13′39″W / 40.58379°N 74.227458°W / 40.58379; -74.227458
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Middlesex
Incorporated April 11, 1906 (as Roosevelt)
Renamed November 7, 1922 (as Carteret)
Named for George Carteret and
Philip Carteret
Government
 • Type borough
 • Body Borough Council
Area
 • Total 4.96 sq mi (12.86 km2)
 • Land 4.39 sq mi (11.37 km2)
 • Water 0.57 sq mi (1.48 km2)  11.53%
Area rank 276th of 565 in state
15th of 25 in county
Elevation
13 ft (4 m)
Population
 • Total 22,844
 • Estimate 
(2019)
23,408
 • Rank 111th of 566 in state
14th of 25 in county
 • Density 5,171.1/sq mi (1,996.6/km2)
 • Density rank 107th of 566 in state
8th of 25 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
07008
Area code(s) 732/848
FIPS code 3402310750
GNIS feature ID 0885181

Carteret is a borough in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 22,844, reflecting an increase of 2,135 (+10.3%) from the 20,709 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,684 (+8.9%) from the 19,025 counted in the 1990 Census.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, Carteret had a total area of 5.000 square miles (12.950 km2), including 4.418 square miles (11.442 km2) of land and 0.582 square miles (1.509 km2) of water (11.65%).

The Rahway River forms the northern boundary of Carteret (Linden is on the other side of the river), and the Arthur Kill is the eastern boundary (with Staten Island, New York on the opposite side). Woodbridge Township borders Carteret on all land-based boundaries.

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the borough include Canda, Chrome (in the borough's southeast), East Rahway, Lamar, Silvan Beach, South Carteret, West Carteret (the portion west of the New Jersey Turnpike) and West Chrome.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1910 5,785
1920 11,047 91.0%
1930 13,339 20.7%
1940 11,976 −10.2%
1950 13,030 8.8%
1960 20,502 57.3%
1970 23,137 12.9%
1980 20,598 −11.0%
1990 19,025 −7.6%
2000 20,709 8.9%
2010 22,844 10.3%
2019 (est.) 23,408 2.5%
Population sources: 1910-1920
1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

Carteret's Sikh community, variously estimated at 1,000 to 2,500, is the largest concentration of Sikhs in the state. The Gurudwara Singh Sabha Sahib, the borough's first gurudwara, had rented a location in Carteret in 1998 before moving to a permanent location in the nearby Port Reading section of Woodbridge Township in 2005.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 22,844 people, 7,591 households, and 5,686 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,171.1 per square mile (1,996.6/km2). There were 8,148 housing units at an average density of 1,844.4 per square mile (712.1/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 50.68% (11,577) White, 14.85% (3,393) Black or African American, 0.35% (80) Native American, 19.04% (4,349) Asian, 0.05% (12) Pacific Islander, 11.18% (2,553) from other races, and 3.85% (880) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 30.93% (7,066) of the population.

There were 7,591 households out of which 37.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 50.1% were married couples living together, 19.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 25.1% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.01 and the average family size was 3.51.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 25.4% under the age of 18, 10.0% from 18 to 24, 28.5% from 25 to 44, 25.4% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 35.1 years. For every 100 females there were 94.3 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 91.0 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $58,614 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,733) and the median family income was $69,192 (+/- $10,119). Males had a median income of $47,405 (+/- $4,676) versus $42,971 (+/- $4,266) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,346 (+/- $2,095). About 11.8% of families and 13.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 21.8% of those under age 18 and 11.5% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 20,709 people, 7,039 households, and 5,208 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,747.4 people per square mile (1,833.9/km2). There were 7,320 housing units at an average density of 1,678.1 per square mile (648.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 50.7% White, 14.9% African American, 0.4% Native American, 19.0% Asian, 0.1% Pacific Islander, 11.2% from other races, and 3.9% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 23.4% of the population.

There were 7,039 households, out of which 35.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 52.1% were married couples living together, 16.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.0% were non-families. 21.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.88 and the average family size was 3.38.

In the borough the population was spread out, with 25.2% under the age of 18, 8.4% from 18 to 24, 30.0% from 25 to 44, 21.4% from 45 to 64, and 15.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females, there were 94.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 90.0 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $47,148, and the median income for a family was $54,609. Males had a median income of $40,172 versus $28,132 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $18,967. About 8.6% of families and 11.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 15.8% of those under age 18 and 9.4% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 59.24 miles (95.34 km) of roadways, of which 52.95 miles (85.21 km) were maintained by the municipality, 4.77 miles (7.68 km) by Middlesex County and 1.52 miles (2.45 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.

The only major road that passes through the center is the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95). Exit 12 of the turnpike is in the borough, and recently has been refurbished by adding more toll lanes and new ramps to CR 602.

Public transportation

NJ Transit local bus service is provided on the 116 route to and from the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Midtown Manhattan and on the 48 route to Elizabeth.

Economy

Portions of the borough are part of an Urban Enterprise Zone (UEZ), one of 32 zones covering 37 municipalities statewide. The borough was selected in 1994 as one of a group of 10 zones added to participate in the program and one of four of those chosen based on a competition. In addition to other benefits to encourage employment and investment within the UEZ, shoppers can take advantage of a reduced 3.3125% sales tax rate (half of the 6+58% rate charged statewide) at eligible merchants. Established in March 1995, the borough's Urban Enterprise Zone status expires in March 2026.

Carteret is the location of the primary data center for the NASDAQ OMX Group's stock exchange.

Carteret was the headquarters of the defunct electronics chain Nobody Beats the Wiz.

Education

The Carteret School District serves students in pre-kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprised of five schools, had an enrollment of 3,821 students and 288.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.3:1. Schools in the district (with 2017–18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics) are Columbus School (723 students; in grades PreK-5), Nathan Hale School (487; PreK-5), Private Nicholas Minue School (678; PreK-5), Carteret Middle School (862; 6-8) and Carteret High School (994; 9-12).

In 2016, borough voters turned down a ballot proposal to switch from an elected school board to an appointed board.

Eighth grade students from all of Middlesex County are eligible to apply to attend the high school programs offered by the Middlesex County Vocational and Technical Schools, a county-wide vocational school district that offers full-time career and technical education at Middlesex County Academy in Edison, the Academy for Allied Health and Biomedical Sciences in Woodbridge Township and at its East Brunswick, Perth Amboy and Piscataway technical high schools, with no tuition charged to students for attendance.

Saint Joseph School serves students in PreK-8 as part of Saint Joseph Roman Catholic Church and is overseen by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Metuchen.

A private rabbinical college, Yeshiva Gedola of Carteret, opened in 2006.

Notable people

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Carteret include:

  • Jim Babjak (born 1957), Dennis Diken (born 1957) and Mike Mesaros of the pop/rock group The Smithereens are former Carteret residents who met in school there.
  • Joseph A. Cafasso (born 1956), former Fox News consultant on military and counterterrorism issues who left the network after allegations surfaced that he misrepresented his military record.
  • Jim Conti of the ska band Streetlight Manifesto.
  • Thomas Deverin (1921–2010), former mayor of Carteret who served 22 years in the New Jersey General Assembly.
  • Keith Hughes (1968–2014), basketball player at Syracuse University and Rutgers who was selected by the Houston Rockets in the 1991 NBA Draft, but never played in the NBA.
  • Isa Leshko (born 1971), artist and author of Allowed to Grow Old: Portraits of Elderly Animals from Farm Sanctuaries published by the University of Chicago Press, grew up in Carteret.
  • Jim McGreevey (born 1957), former Governor of New Jersey, grew up in Carteret.
  • Art McMahon (born 1946), defensive back for the Boston / New England Patriots football team from 1968-1970 and 1972.
  • Nicholas Minue (d. 1943) United States Army Private who received the Medal of Honor for military service in World War II. An elementary school on Post Boulevard in Carteret is named in his honor.
  • Paul J. Pluta, Rear Admiral, United States Coast Guard (Ret.)
  • Joseph Sirola (1929–2019), was an actor known as "The King of the Voice-Overs".
  • Joel Weisman (1943–2009), physician who was one of the first to identify a pattern of illnesses that was ultimately diagnosed as AIDS.
  • Laurence S. Weiss (c. 1919–2003), business executive and politician who served in the New Jersey Senate from 1978 to 1992.
  • Jason Worilds (born 1988), football player selected by the Pittsburgh Steelers in the 2010 NFL Draft.

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