Hightstown, New Jersey facts for kids

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Hightstown, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Hightstown
The Hightstown Civil War Memorial
The Hightstown Civil War Memorial
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Hightstown, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Hightstown, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Mercer
Incorporated March 5, 1853
Named for Hight family
Area
 • Total 1.242 sq mi (3.218 km2)
 • Land 1.211 sq mi (3.137 km2)
 • Water 0.031 sq mi (0.081 km2)  2.52%
Area rank 479th of 565 in state
10th of 12 in county
Elevation 92 ft (28 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 5,494
 • Estimate (2015) 5,517
 • Rank 364th of 565 in state
10th of 12 in county
 • Density 4,536.0/sq mi (1,751.4/km2)
 • Density rank 125th of 565 in state
2nd of 12 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08520
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3402131620
GNIS feature ID 0885254
Website www.hightstownborough.com

Hightstown is a borough in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 5,494, reflecting an increase of 278 (+5.3%) from the 5,216 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 90 (+1.8%) from the 5,126 counted in the 1990 Census.

Hightstown was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 5, 1853, within portions of East Windsor Township. The borough became fully independent c. 1894. Additional portions of East Windsor Township were annexed in 1913, 1915 and 1927. It was named for John and Mary Hight, who established a tavern in the area in the 1750s.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 1.242 square miles (3.218 km2), including 1.211 square miles (3.137 km2) of land and 0.031 square miles (0.081 km2) of water (2.52%).

The borough is an independent municipality surrounded entirely by East Windsor Township, making it part one of 21 pairs of "doughnut towns" in the state, where one municipality entirely surrounds another.

Hightstown is at the central-most point of New Jersey and is roughly equidistant from Philadelphia and New York City.

Climate

The record low temperature recorded in the borough was −16 °F (−27 °C) on January 28, 1935. The record high was 105 °F (41 °C) on July 9, 1936.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1860 970
1870 1,347 38.9%
1880 1,355 0.6%
1890 1,875 38.4%
1900 1,749 −6.7%
1910 1,879 7.4%
1920 2,674 42.3%
1930 3,012 12.6%
1940 3,486 15.7%
1950 3,712 6.5%
1960 4,317 16.3%
1970 5,431 25.8%
1980 4,581 −15.7%
1990 5,126 11.9%
2000 5,216 1.8%
2010 5,494 5.3%
Est. 2015 5,517 0.4%
Population sources:1860-1920
1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010

2010 Census

As of the census of 2010, there were 5,494 people, 1,976 households, and 1,352 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,536.0 per square mile (1,751.4/km2). There were 2,108 housing units at an average density of 1,740.4 per square mile (672.0/km2)*. The racial makeup of the borough was 69.44% (3,815) White, 8.05% (442) Black or African American, 0.56% (31) Native American, 4.08% (224) Asian, 0.15% (8) Pacific Islander, 13.56% (745) from other races, and 4.17% (229) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 30.29% (1,664) of the population.

There were 1,976 households out of which 32.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.2% were married couples living together, 11.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.6% were non-families. 24.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.73 and the average family size was 3.23.

In the borough, the population was spread out with 23.9% under the age of 18, 8.6% from 18 to 24, 31.1% from 25 to 44, 26.7% from 45 to 64, and 9.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36.9 years. For every 100 females there were 99.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 100.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $66,250 (with a margin of error of ± $8,281) and the median family income was $72,583 (± $13,355). Males had a median income of $49,861 (± $9,561) versus $42,361 (± $14,837) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,976 (± $3,402). About 8.2% of families and 8.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 17.2% of those under age 18 and 1.1% of those age 65 or over.

2000 Census

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 5,216 people, 2,001 households, and 1,300 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,251.9 people per square mile (1,637.3/km2). There were 2,081 housing units at an average density of 1,696.4 per square mile (653.2/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 76.53% White, 8.51% African American, 0.36% Native American, 2.28% Asian, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 9.64% from other races, and 2.59% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 20.05% of the population.

There were 2,001 households out of which 30.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.7% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.0% were non-families. 27.9% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.15.

In the borough the population was spread out with 22.5% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 36.8% from 25 to 44, 21.9% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 36 years. For every 100 females there were 103.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 101.2 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $64,299, and the median income for a family was $72,092. Males had a median income of $46,375 versus $35,428 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,605. About 4.3% of families and 7.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.1% of those under age 18 and 4.4% of those age 65 or over.

As of the 2000 Census, 6.31% of Hightstown's residents identified themselves as being of Ecuadorian ancestry, which was the second highest of any municipality in New Jersey and the sixth highest percentage of Ecuadorian people in any place in the United States with 1,000 or more residents identifying their ancestry.

Transportation

Roads and highways

Hightstown is located at the cross-roads of several major roads. The main highway through the borough is Route 33 (which is also concurrent with County Route 539 and County Route 571). U.S. Route 130 just barely passes through the northwest corner, but is usually accessible by Route 33, CR 571 and CR 539. Route 133 (the Hightstown Bypass) is north of the borough. Hightstown is also immediately adjacent to exit 8 of the New Jersey Turnpike (Interstate 95) in East Windsor.

As of May 2010, the borough had a total of 16.74 miles (26.94 km) of roadways, of which 12.70 miles (20.44 km) were maintained by the municipality, 2.74 miles (4.41 km) by Mercer County and 1.30 miles (2.09 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

The history of the Hightstown Bypass dates back to when it was originally planned as Route 92. Running from Route 33, it would have crossed U.S. Route 130 and traveled northwest to a proposed interchange with the then-proposed Somerset Freeway. Decades of lengthy battles resulted in both plans being canceled, and the only surviving section was the bypass of Hightstown itself. This freeway, which opened to the public in November 1999, was ultimately given the designation of Route 133 and runs from CR 571 to Route 33. It only has two interchanges and has traffic signals at both ends. Without a proper connection to the New Jersey Turnpike, the bypass has not lived up to its original expectations and congestion through Hightstown still largely remains. However, with the widening of the Turnpike, Exit 8 was relocated from its original location (immediately at the border of Hightstown) further into East Windsor near Twin Rivers that connects directly to the end point of Route 133 with a grade-separated interchange along Route 33 that was completed in September 2013. This connection was to encourage Turnpike traffic to use the bypass by giving a more direct route to other parts of the region, such as Princeton, and having to avoid downtown Hightstown. Discussions have been made of potentially extending the bypass further south to provide a connection with U.S. Route 130 south of Hightstown, however this section would more than likely carry the Route 33 designation.

Public transportation

Public transportation is provided by the Route 130 Connection shuttle, as well as the Princeton Junction Shuttle.

There is also direct service to New York, as well as other New Jersey communities on the Suburban Coach route 300 to the Port Authority Bus Terminal, Grand Central Terminal and other destinations in Midtown Manhattan and the 600 route to Downtown Manhattan / Wall Street.


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