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Warren Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Warren
Kirch–Ford House
Kirch–Ford House
Map of Warren Township in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Warren Township in Somerset County. Inset: Location of Somerset County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Warren Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Warren Township, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Flag of Somerset County, New Jersey.gif Somerset
Incorporated March 5, 1806
Named for Joseph Warren
Government
 • Type Township
 • Body Township Committee
Area
 • Total 19.64 sq mi (50.86 km2)
 • Land 19.57 sq mi (50.68 km2)
 • Water 0.07 sq mi (0.18 km2)  0.36%
Area rank 144th of 565 in state
8th of 21 in county
Elevation
509 ft (155 m)
Population
 • Total 15,311
 • Estimate 
(2019)
15,625
 • Rank 165th of 566 in state
7th of 21 in county
 • Density 782.5/sq mi (302.1/km2)
 • Density rank 407th of 566 in state
13th of 21 in county
Time zone UTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST) UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
07059
Area code(s) 732 and 908
FIPS code 3403576940
GNIS feature ID 0882173

Warren Township is a township in Somerset County, New Jersey, United States. The township is a bedroom suburb of New York City in the much larger New York metropolitan area, located within the Raritan Valley region. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 15,311, reflecting an increase of 1,052 (+7.4%) from the 14,259 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,429 (+31.7%) from the 10,830 counted in the 1990 Census. Warren is situated in northeastern Somerset County bordering both Morris (along the Passaic River) and Union counties.

In July 2009, CNNMoney.com ranked Warren sixth in the nation on its list of "Best Places to Live" in the United States, citing in particular its schools, June carnival (the Lions Club's annual "Expo"), "wide open spaces" (generally 1.5 acres (0.61 ha) per house), 74 "working farms" ("taxed-as-farmland" tracts, but rural, nevertheless), and proximity to New York City.

The township has been one of the state's highest-income communities. Based on data from the American Community Survey for 2013–2017, Warren Township residents had a median household income of $154,647, ranked 12th in the state among municipalities with more than 10,000 residents, more than double the statewide median of $76,475.

History

Warren was originally inhabited by the Lenape Native Americans and was settled in the 1720s by European farmers. As early as 1900, it became a destination for wealthy residents looking to escape nearby New York City. Warren was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 5, 1806, from portions of Bernards Township and Bridgewater Township. The south-eastern half of the original township (which was close to a railroad and contained most of the population) was separated off as North Plainfield Township (since renamed to Green Brook Township) on April 2, 1872.

Warren was named for Revolutionary War patriot, General Joseph Warren, who was killed at the Battle of Bunker Hill. Warren celebrated its 200th anniversary in 2006.

Geography

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 19.644 square miles (50.877 km2), including 19.567 square miles (50.678 km2) of land and 0.077 square miles (0.199 km2) of water (0.39%).

Unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Coontown, Dock Watch Hollow, Gallia, Mount Bethel, Round Top, Smalleytown, Springdale, Union Village, and Warrenville.

The township borders Bernards Township to the north and west, Bridgewater Township to the southwest, Green Brook Township to the southeast, and Watchung to the east; all of which lie within Somerset County. Northeastern borders are the communities of Long Hill in Morris County and Berkeley Heights in Union County.

The east-west Second Watchung Mountain ridge bisects Warren, with the northern half of the township sloping northward to the Passaic River and Dead River, and the southern half spanning the Washington Valley, between the First and Second Watchung Mountain ridges, through which runs the East Branch of the Middlebrook.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,354
1820 1,452 7.2%
1830 1,561 7.5%
1840 1,601 2.6%
1850 2,148 34.2%
1860 2,338 8.8%
1870 2,705 15.7%
1880 1,204 −55.5%
1890 1,045 −13.2%
1900 1,008 −3.5%
1910 1,035 2.7%
1920 1,083 4.6%
1930 1,399 29.2%
1940 2,139 52.9%
1950 3,316 55.0%
1960 5,386 62.4%
1970 8,592 59.5%
1980 9,805 14.1%
1990 10,830 10.5%
2000 14,259 31.7%
2010 15,311 7.4%
2019 (est.) 15,625 2.1%
Population sources:
1800–1920 1840 1850–1870
1850 1870 1880–1890
1890–1910 1910–1930
1930–1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade.

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 15,311 people, 5,059 households, and 4,285 families residing in the township. The population density was 782.5 per square mile (302.1/km2). There were 5,258 housing units at an average density of 268.7 per square mile (103.7/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 80.94% (12,392) White, 1.52% (233) Black or African American, 0.05% (7) Native American, 15.07% (2,307) Asian, 0.10% (15) Pacific Islander, 0.64% (98) from other races, and 1.69% (259) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.36% (820) of the population.

There were 5,059 households out of which 42.7% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 75.8% were married couples living together, 6.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 15.3% were non-families. 12.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 6.4% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.01 and the average family size was 3.30.

In the township, the population was spread out with 27.8% under the age of 18, 5.9% from 18 to 24, 18.5% from 25 to 44, 34.4% from 45 to 64, and 13.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43.8 years. For every 100 females there were 95.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 94.1 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $135,143 (with a margin of error of +/- $23,156) and the median family income was $162,083 (+/- $17,221). Males had a median income of $115,875 (+/- $15,861) versus $68,450 (+/- $13,300) for females. The per capita income for the township was $71,469 (+/- $6,664). About 0.8% of families and 0.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 0.8% of those under age 18 and none of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 14,259 people, 4,629 households, and 3,939 families residing in the township. The population density was 725.0 people per square mile (279.9/km2). There were 4,718 housing units at an average density of 239.9 per square mile (92.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 86.28% White, 1.26% African American, 0.04% Native American, 10.67% Asian, 0.06% Pacific Islander, 0.41% from other races, and 1.28% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.19% of the population.

There were 4,629 households, out of which 45.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 78.3% were married couples living together, 4.8% had a female householder with no husband present, and 14.9% were non-families. 12.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 5.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.05 and the average family size was 3.33.

In the township the population was spread out, with 29.7% under the age of 18, 4.6% from 18 to 24, 27.5% from 25 to 44, 27.0% from 45 to 64, and 11.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females, there were 99.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.6 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $103,677, and the median income for a family was $121,264. Males had a median income of $80,231 versus $46,356 for females. The per capita income for the township was $49,475. About 0.7% of families and 2.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.4% of those under age 18 and 1.5% of those age 65 or over.

Parks and recreation

Wagner Farm Arboretum, which consists of 92.6 acres (37.5 ha) was the former Wagner Dairy Farm acquired by the township in 2001.

Transportation

2021-06-23 15 09 00 View east along Interstate 78 (Phillipsburg-Newark Expressway) from the overpass for Dead River Road in Warren Township, Somerset County, New Jersey
Interstate 78 in Warren Township

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 126.65 miles (203.82 km) of roadways, of which 101.34 miles (163.09 km) were maintained by the municipality, 18.64 miles (30.00 km) by Somerset County and 6.67 miles (10.73 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Interstate 78 is the most prominent highway serving Warren Township. Other significant roads which pass through the township include County Route 525, County Route 527. and County Route 531.

Points of interest

  • Mount Bethel Meeting House, c. 1770
  • Kirch-Ford House, c. 1770
  • Torino's (traditionally: the King George Inn), c. 1820
  • Springdale United Methodist Church, c. 1840
  • Mount Horeb United Methodist Church, 1867
  • Hofheimer Mausoleum (sometimes colloquially referred to as the "Tomb of the 12 Nuns")
  • Warren Township Schools's 2014–15 School Report Card from the New Jersey Department of Education

Economy

The insurance company Chubb is based in Warren.

Education

The Warren Township Schools serve public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade. As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprised of five schools, had an enrollment of 1,749 students and 196.0 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 8.9:1. Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics.) are Central School with 294 students in grades K-5, Mt. Horeb School with 241 students in grades PreK-5, Angelo L. Tomaso School with 264 students in grades K-5, Woodland School with 265 students in grades K-5 and Warren Middle School with 666 students in grades 6–8.

Students in public school for ninth through twelfth grades attend Watchung Hills Regional High School, which serves students from Warren as well as the neighboring communities of Watchung, Green Brook (in Somerset County) and Long Hill Township (in Morris County). As of the 2017–18 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 2,027 students and 156.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.0:1. The district's board of education has nine members, who are elected directly by the voters to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with three seats up for each year. Of the nine elected seats, four are allocated to Warren Township.

Notable people

See also (related category): People from Warren Township, New Jersey

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Warren Township include:

  • Michael Arrom, musician and keyboardist for Steve Vai.
  • Scott Braun, studio host and reporter for MLB Network and NHL Network.
  • Joe Cerisano, singer, songwriter, record producer.
  • Austen Crehore (1893–1962), World War I pilot in the Armée de l'Air and the recipient of the Legion of Honor and Croix de Guerre with two palms.
  • Monica Crowley (born 1968), conservative radio and TV talk show personality.
  • Donald DiFrancesco (born 1944), former N.J. Senate president and Acting Governor.
  • Daniel Edelman (born 2003), professional soccer player who plays as a midfielder for New York Red Bulls II.
  • Mike Ferguson (born 1970), former U.S. Congressman.
  • James L. Flanagan (1925–2015), electrical engineer.
  • Bob Franks (1951–2010), former N.J. legislative leader and U.S. Congressman.
  • Emma Fursch-Madi (1847–1894), French operatic soprano.
  • Gloria Gaynor (born 1949), singer, known for I Will Survive.
  • Chris Kratt (born 1969) host of Kratts' Creatures and Zoboomafoo as well as Be the Creature, which runs on the National Geographic Channel.
  • Martin Kratt (born 1965), brother of Chris, and also an educational nature show host.
  • James Morris (born 1947), opera singer.
  • Amber Skye Noyes (born 1987), actress and singer, known for her portrayal of Tori Windsor in The CW series Beauty & the Beast and Celine Fox in the ABC thriller Quantico.
  • Calvin Pace (born 1980), outside linebacker for the New York Jets.
  • David Palmer, vocalist and songwriter, best known as a former member of Steely Dan and as the lyricist of the Carole King number two hit, "Jazzman".
  • Allison Reed (born 1994), ice dancer who competes with Vasili Rogov for Israel.
  • Cathy Reed (born 1987), American-born Japanese ice dancer, who has competed with her brother Chris as her partner.
  • Chris Reed (born 1989), American-born Japanese ice dancer, who has competed with his sister Cathy as his partner.
  • Adam Riess (born 1969), Nobel Prize winner in Physics, 2011.
  • Dan Schulman (born 1958), President and CEO of PayPal, Chairman of Symantec.
  • Ravi Shankar (1920–2012), musician and composer best known for his work on the sitar.
  • J. R. Smith (born 1985), NBA player for the Cleveland Cavaliers.
  • Steven H. Temares (born 1958), CEO of Bed Bath & Beyond.
  • Jeffrey Vanderbeek, former owner of the New Jersey Devils.
  • Lily Yip (born 1963), Olympic table tennis player and coach.
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