Carl Barks facts for kids

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Carl Barks a Finnland 94
Carl Barks in 1994

Carl Barks (March 27, 1901 - August 25, 2000) was a famous cartoonist. He was the inventor of Scrooge McDuck, the Beagle Boys, Gyro Gearloose and many other Walt Disney characters. He was often called the most important artist in Disney comics.

Carl Barks was born on March 27, 1901, near Merrill, Oregon, as part of a farming family. At the age of 10, he became interested in art for the first time. When he was 15, his mother died, and he began to help his father on the family's farm. In 1935, he took a contract with Disney and started as one of the studio's artists. Some months later, he become a part of Ted Sears "Story Department" at the Disney studios, where he wrote more than two dozen stories for short films with Donald Duck and other characters until 1942.

In 1942 he went to "Western Publishing". There he started drawing comics with Donald Duck and later with other characters - most of them he created by himself. He held this job until 1966, when he retired.

Barks worked for the Disney Studio and Western Publishing where he created Duckburg and many of its inhabitants, such as Scrooge McDuck (1947), Gladstone Gander (1948), the Beagle Boys (1951), The Junior Woodchucks (1951), Gyro Gearloose (1952), Cornelius Coot (1952), Flintheart Glomgold (1956), John D. Rockerduck (1961) and Magica De Spell (1961). Fantagraphics Books called him "the Hans Christian Andersen of comic books."

By the early 1990s, Carl Barks had become a comic legend. In 1994, at the age of 93, for the first time in his long life, he traveled to Europe and visited around a dozen countries. Some months earlier, his third wife, Margaret, called Garé, had died at the age of 75.

In 1999, leukemia began to destroy Barks' body. The Duck Man died, aged 99, on August 25, 2000, at his home in Grants Pass, Oregon.

Barks' influence

Interior page from Walt Disney's Comics and Stories
Omelet opening page

Barks' Donald Duck stories were rated #7 on The Comics Journal list of 100 top comics; his Uncle Scrooge stories were rated #20.

Steven Spielberg and George Lucas have acknowledged that the rolling-boulder booby trap in the opening scene of Raiders of the Lost Ark was inspired by the 1954 Carl Barks Uncle Scrooge adventure "The Seven Cities of Cibola" (Uncle Scrooge #7). Lucas and Spielberg have also said that some of Barks's stories about space travel and the depiction of aliens had an influence on them. Lucas wrote the foreword to the 1982 Uncle Scrooge McDuck: His Life and Times. In it he calls Barks’s stories "cinematic" and "a priceless part of our literary heritage".

The Walt Disney Treasures DVD set Chronological Donald, Volume 2 includes a salute to Barks.

Carl Barks has an asteroid named after him, 2730 Barks.

In Almere, Netherlands a street was named after him: Carl Barksweg. The same neighborhood also includes a Donald Ducklaan and a Goofystraat.

Japanese animator and cartoonist Osamu Tezuka, who created manga such as "Astro Boy" and "Black Jack", was a fan of Barks' work. New Treasure Island, one of Tezuka's first works, was partly influenced by Donald Duck Finds Pirate Gold.

Filmography

Films where Barks served as storyman or story director:

  • Modern Inventions (May 29, 1937). Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Donald's Ostrich (December 10, 1937).
  • Self Control (February 11, 1938). Barks served as the story director.
  • Donald's Better Self (March 11, 1938). Barks served as the story director.
  • Donald's Nephews (April 15, 1938).
  • Good Scouts (July 8, 1938). Barks served as the story director. Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Donald's Golf Game (November 4, 1938). Barks served as the story director.
  • Donald's Lucky Day (January 13, 1939). Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • The Hockey Champ (April 28, 1939). Barks served as the story director. Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Donald's Cousin Gus (May 19, 1939). Barks served as the story director. Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Sea Scouts (June 30, 1939). Barks served as the story director. Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Donald's Penguin (August 11, 1939). Barks served as the story director.
  • The Autograph Hound (September 1, 1939).
  • Mr. Duck Steps Out (June 7, 1940). Barks served as the story director.
  • Put-Put Troubles (June 19, 1940).
  • Bone Trouble (June 28, 1940).
  • Donald's Vacation (August 9, 1940).
  • Window Cleaners (September 20, 1940). Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Fire Chief (December 13, 1940). Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Timber (January 10, 1941). Barks served as the story director. Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Golden Eggs (March 7, 1941).
  • Early to Bed (July 11, 1941). Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Truant Officer Donald (August 1, 1941). Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Old MacDonald Duck (September 12, 1941). Barks served as the story director. Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Chef Donald (December 5, 1941). Barks served as the story director. Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • The Village Smithy (January 16, 1942).
  • Donald's Snow Fight (April 10, 1942). Barks served as the story director. Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Donald Gets Drafted (May 1, 1942). Barks served as the story director.
  • The Army Mascot (May 22, 1942).
  • The Vanishing Private (September 25, 1942). Barks served as the story director. Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Sky Trooper (November 6, 1942).
  • Bellboy Donald (December 18, 1942). Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • The Old Army Game (November 5, 1943). Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Home Defense (November 26, 1943). Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • Trombone Trouble (February 18, 1944). Barks served as the story director. Barks also drew many of the storyboards for the film.
  • The Plastics Inventor (September 1, 1944).

Carl Barks Facts for Kids. Kiddle Encyclopedia.