Lawrence Township, Mercer County, New Jersey facts for kids

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Not to be confused with Lawrence Township, Cumberland County.
Lawrence Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Lawrence
Israel Stevens House
Israel Stevens House
Nickname(s): "Where Nature Smiles for 22 Miles"
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Location in Mercer County and the state of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Lawrence Township, Mercer County, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Lawrence Township, Mercer County, New Jersey
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Mercer
Formed February 20, 1697 as Maidenhead Township
Incorporated February 21, 1798
Renamed January 24, 1816 as Lawrence Township
Named for Capt. James Lawrence
Area
 • Total 22.063 sq mi (57.143 km2)
 • Land 21.808 sq mi (56.483 km2)
 • Water 0.255 sq mi (0.660 km2)  1.15%
Area rank 124th of 565 in state
4th of 12 in county
Elevation 82 ft (25 m)
Population (2010 Census)
 • Total 33,472
 • Estimate (2015) 33,242
 • Rank 68th of 565 in state
4th of 12 in county
 • Density 1,534.8/sq mi (592.6/km2)
 • Density rank 330st of 565 in state
8th of 12 in county
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08648
Area code(s) 609
FIPS code 3402139510
GNIS feature ID 0882126
Website www.lawrencetwp.com

Lawrence Township is a township in Mercer County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 33,472, reflecting an increase of 4,313 (+14.8%) from the 29,159 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 3,372 (+13.1%) from the 25,787 counted in the 1990 Census.

History

What is now Lawrence Township was originally formed as Maidenhead Township on February 20, 1697, while the area was still part of Burlington County in West Jersey. The township was named by the early Quaker settlers after Maidenhead, a Thames River village west of London. It became part of the newly created Hunterdon County on March 11, 1714. Maidenhead Township was incorporated as one of New Jersey's initial group of 104 townships by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 21, 1798.

On January 24, 1816, the municipality was renamed Lawrence Township, in honor of Captain James Lawrence — commander of the frigate USS Chesapeake, one of the naval heroes of the War of 1812, and a native of relatively nearby Burlington, New Jersey— best known for his dying command of "Don't Give up the Ship". Lawrence Township became part of Mercer County at its creation on February 22, 1838. Portions of the township were taken to form Millham Township on February 10, 1882, which was annexed six years later by Trenton.

On September 23, 2003, at approximately 8:25am, an F1 tornado ripped through Lawrence Township. The tornado followed a path along Princeton Pike and caused widespread damage to homes. There were no fatalities.

Geography

2013-05-04 15 37 44 View down the Shabakunk Creek just below Colonial Lake in Colonial Lake Park, Lawrence Township, New Jersey
The Shabakunk Creek below Colonial Lake

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 22.063 square miles (57.143 km2), including 21.808 square miles (56.483 km2) of land and 0.255 square miles (0.660 km2) of water (1.15%).

Lawrenceville (with a 2010 Census population of 3,887) is a census-designated place and unincorporated community located within Lawrence Township.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include: Bakersville, Clarksville, Colonial Lakelands, Coxs Corner, Eldridge Park, Franklin Corner, Harneys Corner, Lawrence Station, Lewisville, Louisville, Port Mercer, Princessville, Quaker Bridge, Rosedale, Slackwood and Sturwood Hamlet.

Many area residents often refer to all of Lawrence Township as Lawrenceville, as a significant majority of township residents use a Lawrenceville mailing address as specified by the United States Postal Service, while other residents have mailing addresses in either Princeton or Trenton. The township was notified by the Postal Service in 2007 that the preferred designation for the ZIP code 08648 would be changed to "Lawrence Township".

The township borders the Mercer County municipalities of Ewing Township, Hamilton Township, Hopewell Township, Princeton, Trenton and West Windsor Township.

Demographics

Historical population
Census Pop.
1790 1,032
1810 1,086
1820 1,354 24.7%
1830 1,433 5.8%
1840 1,556 8.6%
1850 1,838 18.1%
1860 2,024 10.1%
1870 2,251 11.2%
1880 3,174 41.0%
1890 1,448 * −54.4%
1900 1,555 7.4%
1910 2,522 62.2%
1920 3,686 46.2%
1930 6,293 70.7%
1940 6,522 3.6%
1950 8,499 30.3%
1960 13,665 60.8%
1970 19,567 43.2%
1980 19,724 0.8%
1990 25,787 30.7%
2000 29,159 13.1%
2010 33,472 14.8%
Est. 2015 33,242 −0.7%
Population sources:
1790-1920 1840
1850-1870 1850 1870
1870 1880-1890
1890-1910 1910-1930
1930-1990 2000 2010
* = Lost territory in previous decade

Census 2010

As of the census of 2010, there were 33,472 people, 12,524 households, and 8,116 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,534.8 per square mile (592.6/km2). There were 13,239 housing units at an average density of 607.1 per square mile (234.4/km2)*. The racial makeup of the township was 69.68% (23,322) White, 10.76% (3,602) Black or African American, 0.20% (66) Native American, 14.10% (4,721) Asian, 0.09% (29) Pacific Islander, 2.73% (913) from other races, and 2.45% (819) from two or more races. [[Hispanic (U.S. Census)|Hispanic or Latino of any race were 7.48% (2,503) of the population.

There were 12,524 households out of which 29.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 51.1% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.2% were non-families. 29.2% of all households were made up of individuals, and 11.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.45 and the average family size was 3.07.

In the township, the population was spread out with 20.0% under the age of 18, 13.5% from 18 to 24, 26.0% from 25 to 44, 26.7% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.3 years. For every 100 females there were 86.8 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and old there were 82.7 males.

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $88,693 (with a margin of error of +/- $5,442) and the median family income was $108,743 (+/- $4,377). Males had a median income of $68,305 (+/- $6,890) versus $50,103 (+/- $5,345) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $43,136 (+/- $3,030). About 4.4% of families and 5.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 7.8% of those under age 18 and 6.2% of those age 65 or over.

Census 2000

As of the 2000 United States Census there were 29,159 people, 10,797 households, and 7,233 families residing in the township. The population density was 1,317.0 people per square mile (508.5/km²). There were 11,180 housing units at an average density of 504.9 per square mile (195.0/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 79.22% White, 9.28% African American, 0.08% Native American, 7.91% Asian, 0.11% Pacific Islander, 1.79% from other races, and 1.60% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.61% of the population.

There were 10,797 households out of which 31.4% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.9% were married couples living together, 10.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 33.0% were non-families. 26.8% of all households were made up of individuals and 9.7% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.49 and the average family size was 3.05.

In the township the population was spread out with 21.7% under the age of 18, 12.4% from 18 to 24, 29.4% from 25 to 44, 23.0% from 45 to 64, and 13.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 88.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.4 males.

The median income for a household in the township was $67,959, and the median income for a family was $82,704. Males had a median income of $56,681 versus $38,468 for females. The per capita income for the township was $33,120. About 2.6% of families and 4.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 4.0% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Roads and highways

2014-05-16 14 13 12 View north along Interstate 95 from the Lawrence Road (U.S. Route 206) overpass in Lawrence Township, New Jersey
View north along Interstate 95 from U.S. Route 206 in Lawrence Township

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 132.33 miles (212.96 km) of roadways, of which 102.37 miles (164.75 km) were maintained by the municipality, 11.48 miles (18.48 km) by Mercer County and 18.48 miles (29.74 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.

Two major transportation routes traverse the Township. Part of the Interstate Highway network, Interstate 95 and Interstate 295, describe a semicircle through Lawrence. The Interstate route numbers change at the highway's intersection with U.S. Route 1, the other major highway bisecting the municipality. U.S. 1 is in effect three different roads: the original route from Trenton to New Brunswick in the southern half of the Township, the limited access Trenton Freeway, and the combined road in the northern half that serves as a regional arterial linking the Interstates with New Brunswick and Route 18. U.S. Route 206 is the main artery within the township itself, running from Trenton to Princeton roughly north-to-south. It is a segment of the historic Lincoln Highway, and before that, it was part of the main New York-Philadelphia Post road. Locals refer to it alternately as Route 206 or Lawrence Road. Major county routes that pass through include County Route 533, County Route 546 and County Route 569.

2014-05-16 13 54 15 View north along the Brunswick Pike (U.S. Route 1) from the Interstate 295 overpass in Lawrence Township, New Jersey
View north along U.S. Route 1 from Interstate 295 in Lawrence Township

Lawrence Township is the site of what has been called the "abrupt ending" of Interstate 95. This resulted from politics in Somerset County that eliminated its planned connection of the Somerset Freeway to Interstate 287. When driving on I-95 north while approaching the interchange for U.S. Route 1, the 95 designation abruptly ends and the highway turns south and becomes Interstate 295. Motorists wishing to continue north are required to find an alternate route, either by taking US 1 north, or (are directed by signs) to take Interstate 295 south to the Central Jersey Expressway (Interstate 195) east and to the New Jersey Turnpike (the continuation of Interstate 95) at Exit 7A in Robbinsville Township.

Public transportation

The busy Northeast Corridor rail line, carrying Amtrak and NJ Transit trains, runs along the eastern edge of the township. The nearest stations are in Hamilton, Trenton, Princeton and Princeton Junction.

NJ Transit provides bus service to Trenton on the 600, 603, 605, 606, 609 and 613 routes, and local service on route 612.

A rail spur used to run to Lawrenceville from Trenton, but was discontinued in the 1970s and is now a bicycle trail. From Lawrenceville, a trolley line to Princeton existed from 1900 to 1941, but was dismantled before World War II, and the right-of-way largely has reverted to neighboring landowners.

The nearest commercial airport is Trenton-Mercer Airport, formerly known as the Mercer County Airport, in Ewing with nonstop service to 10 major cities in the eastern half of the United States. Lawrence Township is roughly equidistant to the other two nearby commercial airports, Philadelphia International Airport and Newark Liberty International Airport.

Points of interest

The Port Mercer Canal House is located at 4378 Quakerbridge Road, along the Delaware and Raritan Canal near the border of West Windsor Township and Princeton. The house was built in the 1830s as housing for the bridge tender and his family. The bridge tender was needed to open the swing bridge when canal boats came through, then close it to allow traffic to cross over the canal.

The Delaware and Raritan Canal has an intact walking towpath for most of its length. Additional walking trail areas in the township include Shipetaukin Woods, Carson Road Woods, and part of Rosedale Park. Lawrence Township is part of the Lawrence Hopewell Trail, currently under development.

Brearley Oak, Lawrence Township, NJ - May 2013
Brearley Oak (May 2013)

Jasna Polana was the home of John Seward Johnson I of Johnson & Johnson. His widow converted it into Tournament Players Club at Jasna Polana golf course.

Terhune Orchards, a winery and produce farm.

Colonial Lake, a local man-made lake, centerpiece of the township's Colonial Lake Park.

The Brearley Oak, the largest Black Oak tree in New Jersey, is located along the Princeton Pike.

Images for kids


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